PDA

View Full Version : What do you guys do for a living/work?



Chris Rodgers
06-22-2013, 12:05 PM
I'm curious to see what all of my fellow competitors here do for work. I would like to see the type of training you do and if you have found that certain methods have been necessary because of your line of work or if you needed to cut down volume or frequency because of your work. Four years ago I became a structural Ironworker. This is a very demanding physical trade. I feel like often in the gym I am choosing to do or not do certain things based on what I know I will be doing at work in the next day or two. Meaning, if I do a ton of volume on squats or pulls and know I will be climbing around steel the next day or moving some heavy shit around, I'm probably not going to push my volume on those lifts. Also, since I am very active at work I don't put a lot of emphasis on GPP work and/or cardio.

So now, if I sign up for a meet I really don't know what work is going to have in store for me those last few days before the meet. I might have some grueling, physically demanding days leading up to the meet. My next meet in July 13th and I just found out I might be doing overnights setting steel that week. This would mean I will be working until 5 AM busting my ass the morning of the meet.

Just curious if you guys also adjust your training based on your work or if you follow your training to the letter and just allow everything else to work itself out.

JK1
06-22-2013, 01:10 PM
I'm a zoo/wildlife veterinarian who is also a graduate student (working on PhD and second residency) and affiliate professor (teaching veterinary students) at a college of veterinary medicine. My wife is also a veterinarian, board certified in surgery and emergency and critical care, who works as the night time (ie 5 pm to 8 am) surgeon 6 days on, one day off. She also teaches during the day, so its not uncommon for her to get 1-2 hours of sleep, then get stuck at the university all day long due to meetings and class, only to be up most of the next night with an emergency. I too have done those kinds of hours.

We both will adjust our training based on mental fatigue more than anything else. You can compensate for physical fatigue with a the right mindset, nutrition, and a little caffiene. If your mind isn't right, you won't be able to push yourself.

I actually get somewhat frustrated by questions like yours. The reality is many of us work jobs that are either long and hard, physically demanding jobs or we work jobs that have a great emotional/mental strain. Both of them can affect your performance on the platform.

What you have to do is plan ahead and plan carefully. My wifes "on clinics" schedule is set in December and June each year, not to be changed without special permission from the department head. So we pick our meets months in advance and adjust everything so the time we put into training makes it so those meets can happen. I always take 1-2 days of vacation time (ie the thursday or the friday before a meet) off work. More than anything so I can rest and clear my head.

yes it means using vacation time, but doing that will help a whole lot with making sure you are prepared for the meet.

Falcon63
06-22-2013, 01:16 PM
I'm a full-time student. I go to school, talk to hot chicks, go to practice, and drive about 15 minutes to go hiking and (illegally) climbing at the nearby state park.

I love it and wouldn't change it (until I become a CPT through NASM, that is).

Rock1984
06-22-2013, 01:32 PM
I do a mostly white collar job - Project quality Manager at a major O&G OEM corp.

What can affect my training is mental stress, especially in the last few weeks of the financial quarter, or short sleep when I have to travel.

When I was on the shop floor dismantling and reassembling gas turbines, as long as I was able to stay hydrated I was good to go, with no noticeable effect on training, while now at times the lack of focus from mental fatigue gets me.

ScottYard
06-22-2013, 04:14 PM
I am a senior programs manager for a community based non profit agency that supports developementally disabled adults. I manage a supported living program now but on July 1st Im getting promoted and will be supervising our vocatonal services center.

kingns
06-23-2013, 12:33 PM
I'm a CPA. Which involves sitting at a desk and traveling to different clients offices weekly, and traveling a lot. Even when I work LONG hours I still make it to the gym, the worst is when I have to travel and can't find a good gym. I've moved training days around so max effort days on the weekend, so if I can't find a good gym during the week while traveling, I can do RE workouts at any commercial gym or of need be, body weight

chris mason
06-23-2013, 01:10 PM
I think your training is 100% effected by the rest of your life. With that said, some people devote themselves entirely to the training and competing and structure their lives around it. You just have to make the choice that works best for you.

Falcon63
06-23-2013, 01:39 PM
I think your training is 100% effected by the rest of your life. With that said, some people devote themselves entirely to the training and competing and structure their lives around it. You just have to make the choice that works best for you.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lH_jpiS_T7Y

Travis Bell
06-23-2013, 02:46 PM
LOL I wouldn't agree with that video but to each their own.

I run a gym which is my main job. On the side I'm also a logger and run a commercial mowing business. If there are extra daylight hours I'm using them to my advantage.

Summer time is pretty rigorous in my body. It's hot, I'm physically active all day and I'm tired at the end of it. Every year as soon as about June rolls around my weight begins to struggle and I have to really make an effort to keep it on or I'd be in the 220's by fall lol.

As much as I do and as many comittments as I have, I feel the ability to train is mostly mental for me. I DECIDE not to have any excuses.

Paulo_Santos
06-23-2013, 05:08 PM
PoPo in NJ. I started training with weights because I was pathetically weak and that is no bueno for a job like this where you are going to be dealing with some of the craziest people in our society. I started with CrossFit, but quickly realized that I wasn't getting as strong as I'd like to be, which led me to powerlifting. It started out as just as a means to get strong, but it has lead me to compete, which I love.

At 38 YOA, married with two young boys, I know I don't have the time to devote everything to Powerlifting, but since I'm able to workout on duty for 1 hour, it really helps.

Falcon63
06-24-2013, 03:08 AM
LOL I wouldn't agree with that video but to each their own.

I run a gym which is my main job. On the side I'm also a logger and run a commercial mowing business. If there are extra daylight hours I'm using them to my advantage.

Summer time is pretty rigorous in my body. It's hot, I'm physically active all day and I'm tired at the end of it. Every year as soon as about June rolls around my weight begins to struggle and I have to really make an effort to keep it on or I'd be in the 220's by fall lol.

As much as I do and as many comittments as I have, I feel the ability to train is mostly mental for me. I DECIDE not to have any excuses.

That's great, and I respect that. I guess I'm just a little more risky and irresponsible, haha. I'd rather become a derelict chasing my dreams than working at a job I don't enjoy.

Butcher
06-24-2013, 04:33 PM
Chris, you message inbox is too full to accept messages. I have a question on being an ironworker.

I have been all over in the past few months from college student to general labor in three different positions through a temp agency. My adjustments are generally push training back a day. I lift at night, usually after the wife and kids are asleep. Doing 3x a week this has been much easier than a 4x week system.

AZBengoshi
06-25-2013, 12:47 PM
Lawyer

Barbaccio
06-27-2013, 02:00 PM
Systems Administrator. I never get to complain about being tired. My training parter Tim Gale works on the NJ State Road Crew. That bastard can be out jackhammering all day and still makes it in to train. Leaves very little room for excuses of being too tired.

vdizenzo
06-27-2013, 03:04 PM
Shepherd

Chubrock
06-27-2013, 05:05 PM
I'm a cop. I rotate between nights and days. 8 day stretches at a time. That's the biggest toll on my gym and family time. Even when I'm off at 5a I'm up at 8-9a in order to maintain some semblance of a training schedule.

Stumprrp
06-27-2013, 05:15 PM
Digital Court Reporter for the family court here in Providence. Sounds fancy, but its an easy great job that pays well for someone with only a high school degree and a few college credits. I'm really struggling bringing myself to go back to school.

fresh290
06-29-2013, 10:26 AM
Auto tech.... 6 days a week and 10-12 hours a day. it gets pretty hard but i just adjust (weight/days) so i dont kill myself too much.

700
06-30-2013, 11:44 AM
Systems Administrator. I never get to complain about being tired. My training parter Tim Gale works on the NJ State Road Crew. That bastard can be out jackhammering all day and still makes it in to train. Leaves very little room for excuses of being too tired.

That's the thing.... It is hard to say which one of you actually has it harder: sitting in a chair all day with your face pressed to a screen is tremendously unnatural for the human body. The fact is that we are not well adapted to sitting on our asses for 8-12hrs a day; this makes most modern work/workplaces chronic stressors on our systems - not optimal for training...

Now, there are laws of diminishing returns on both sides of the fence... but still, the above must be considered; don't assume (this goes to everyone) modern desk-work is some kind of good thing for the trainee... I've spent 14hr shifts practically chained to a desk... and had 8 hr days entirely on my feet - which one do you think my body learned to like more?

Shawn Bellon
06-30-2013, 01:38 PM
I write for a couple magazines for fun and coach people. Real job is working with mentally ill.

RFabsik
06-30-2013, 06:52 PM
Shouting out for the mental health profession, I'm a psychiatrist.

Alex.V
06-30-2013, 07:54 PM
That's the thing.... It is hard to say which one of you actually has it harder: sitting in a chair all day with your face pressed to a screen is tremendously unnatural for the human body. The fact is that we are not well adapted to sitting on our asses for 8-12hrs a day; this makes most modern work/workplaces chronic stressors on our systems - not optimal for training...


I gotta agree- I was less fatigued and more ready to train after pulling a 12 (usually 13-14) hour overnight shift as a paramedic than after spending 8-9 hours sitting in a bloody office.

GazzyG
07-01-2013, 03:24 AM
Writer. Sit at home at the keyboard all day, everyday.

Gives me no end of back ache. Going out to the gym or for a run actually feels relaxing.

Songsangnim
07-01-2013, 07:21 PM
Full time teacher in the South Korean public school system. I alternate between sitting at a desk typing up lesson plans/doing paperwork and standing in front of a class teaching. Here it's basically a 9-5 job (8:30 AM-4:35 PM at my particular school) although it is 'expected' that you stay around until at least 5-6 PM...even if you have nothing to do.

I usually leave around 5 PM . Go home/shopping eat and relax until about 7:30-8:00 PM when I pack my gym bag and go to train. (4 days of the week).

Other than the time though I haven't really adjusted my training to my job...I do what's on the schedule for the night and then go home after the work in the gym is done.

KevinStarke
07-02-2013, 06:18 AM
For 6 years I sold wine and hosted wine tastings in CT and NYC. I moved to VT last year and am now a wine buyer for two shops. Pretty hardcore I know.

FearFactory
07-02-2013, 03:15 PM
Probably the best job ever for someone who likes BBing.

Software developer.

Shawn Bellon
07-02-2013, 04:00 PM
Shouting out for the mental health profession, I'm a psychiatrist.
High 5!

GazzyG
07-03-2013, 05:24 AM
For 6 years I sold wine and hosted wine tastings in CT and NYC. I moved to VT last year and am now a wine buyer for two shops. Pretty hardcore I know.

That... sounds... EPIC.

700
07-03-2013, 10:18 AM
That... sounds... EPIC.

Equally impressed....

Dank27
07-04-2013, 04:20 PM
Im a commercial banker. I agree that balancing my training is 100% mental. Summer is always worse for me.

KevinStarke
07-05-2013, 11:01 AM
My old man was a plumber and has the body of an 85 year old at 55 to show for it. Always told me to get a job that wouldn't break my body, figured i'd let the powerlifting do that.

muscle_g
07-05-2013, 03:07 PM
I'm a mechanic helper at Case International Tractor. Everything that goes on the tractors and combiners is very heavy, so it's a very physical job. Also in the South Carolina heat it is very hot in the summer. And sometimes I am out in the sun all day. I just try to drink a gallon or more of water a day and keep my food intake up.

mastermonster
07-08-2013, 10:24 AM
Elementary P.E. Teacher and love it. Used to coach H.S. football and Middle School basketball too. I had little time to train or do anything else til I got out of coaching.

Jonathan E
07-10-2013, 01:21 AM
College football player.

During the summer I work for a fire hose/ladder testing company for various fire departments, though.

Stonecutter
07-10-2013, 04:32 AM
I'm a dental student, so most of my life/time is scheduled around that coming first. Yes, I have had to adjust a lot. Never have enough sleep, rarely have a great diet, etc. It has certainly slowed my progress, but I make it work. I have had to move days around and skip one here or there, but it has never thrown me off by more than a few days. I think that lifting at 6:00am on 5 hours sleep puts me at about 80% of my potential fully rested though, so hopefully soon I will start really moving.