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View Full Version : Thoughts on doing only top end work for ME



vdizenzo
07-25-2013, 08:29 AM
Considering lockout is the greatest weakness in my bench, I am considering only doing partial range movements for my ME exercises. I will have a dynamic day to focus on full range form and speed. Those are my greatest strengths so I want to continue to capitalize on them.

I was thinking I would work different boards, rack work, and floor presses for ME. I will then get in the shirt for some full range rep work. Probably won't touch much at first, but will work my groove. Then I will do a supplemental movement before assistance.

In the past I have hammered tri work, but that was more with supplemental and assistance work. My theory is to invest in partial range ME work to bring up my lockout. My thinking is to stick with this plan for at least six months. Of course if I do get close to a meet, I might have to dial the shirt in for a week or two as the ME movement.

Thoughts...

Chicksanboy
07-25-2013, 12:27 PM
I think board work and floor presses would help your lockout immensely, and when doing rack work, I always preferred to press out of safety straps rather than the actual rack itself. I dont know why, but with the straps allow for a little more movement, I can make the bar adjust to my set up, rather than adjusting my setup to the bar, if that makes sense.

If I may ask, why not add in Bench+Chains of Reverse Band Bench, wouldnt those allow you to overload your lock out as well?

I also have to point out that your bench is more than my squat and deadlift and if you want to ignore my post completely, I would totally understand.

The best of luck

vdizenzo
07-25-2013, 02:17 PM
I think board work and floor presses would help your lockout immensely, and when doing rack work, I always preferred to press out of safety straps rather than the actual rack itself. I dont know why, but with the straps allow for a little more movement, I can make the bar adjust to my set up, rather than adjusting my setup to the bar, if that makes sense.

If I may ask, why not add in Bench+Chains of Reverse Band Bench, wouldnt those allow you to overload your lock out as well?

I also have to point out that your bench is more than my squat and deadlift and if you want to ignore my post completely, I would totally understand.

The best of luck

Heck no, great response. I forgot about suspended presses.

Regarding full range, chains, bands, and reverse bands. Done that, been there. They do not seem to improve my lockout. Instead I find I just try to generate more speed to compensate for the overload. Did not significantly improve my ability to grind.

evilxxx
07-25-2013, 03:11 PM
ME rack work has always been my best friend to get past the lockout issues...

Brian Hopper
07-25-2013, 07:21 PM
I think it's a good idea seeing how your lockout is a weakness for you. At least it would be worth a shot to try it out and see how it works out for you.

Travis Bell
07-25-2013, 08:40 PM
I would definitely add some lockout work in there, but personally I wouldn't work on it exclusively. Only reason is we've seen guys do that time and again, thinking it will help their equipped bench and they still can't lock out big weights in the shirt.

What happens is you train your body to move weight a very limited distance. Then you go to a meet and expect your body to be able to move weights double or triple that distance. It just doesn't work out well.

Countless times I've had guys who could lock out 50 or more lbs off boards raw and come meet time I end up locking out more in the shirt than they do.

One of the things I think guys overlook when it comes to lockout is often upper back work. It has a huge impact on power at the top.

If it were me, I'd rotate. One week full range one week partial. Being smart each week trying to find a way to attack your weakness each week. Reverse bands, close grip variations, normal band setup, paused benches and cambered bar for your full range stuff. 2 and 3brd, both competition and close grip, mid and high level pin presses and floor press, for your top end work. All of those I'd do with some chains or bands when mixing it up in training.

That and pound the piss out of your upper back and you end up with a 900lb bench in my opinion.

April Mathis
07-26-2013, 01:55 AM
I like the idea of every other week doing lockout heavy and the other week be full-range as the first heavy lift for bench. Then the full-range could also be things like bands or chains sometimes so it would also be more geared towards lockout.

Besides that I have read and watched several great shirt benchers do heavy boards against bands/chains or boards with reverse bands both raw and shirted. Mostly 3 and 4 boards I've seen used in this way. I cannot attest to how well it works or not because I haven't used a bench shirt enough to try it yet, but I know these have been used by several guys with shirted benches in the 800s and 900s. And an old training partner of mine and another friend of mine have both gotten their shirted benches from low 500s to in the 600s this way when neither were ever good benchers with or without a shirt (even though 600 is not a lot for a shirted bench, it can be for someone that is not a good bencher to reach obviously).

ChuckS14
07-26-2013, 12:43 PM
Mix it up constantly. Include top end as an ME move but then mix in shirt, mid and full range. You can also try putting your heavy lockouts/tris after dynamic/ speed work. Im not a fan of all heavy stuff on one day...for a number of reasons. Hit volume after your heavy ME, use dynnamic bench as a tricep move, and follow that w heavy boards raw. If you like rack lockouts do them. Knowing your strong points, Id say put the heavy tri/ lockout stuff on you dynamic day so you have more gas in the tank to hit them harder. Also do sets of 5 or 6. Taxes you unmercifully,and helps w grind.

ScottYard
07-28-2013, 07:48 PM
I made a huge use of the 5 board. I used it weekly after my shirt bench work.