PDA

View Full Version : Why am I gaining weight?



Allie
05-19-2001, 02:56 PM
Ok as most of you know I'm working on losing weight. So far so good.... at least thats what I thought. My clothes keep getting bigger and I swear I'm losing weight, but my scale says I gained 5 lbs :mad:

I've been eating alot better, and working out more often. I go running 4 days a week usually 3 miles. And heres an idea of what I eat

Breakfast 5 A.M.: 1/2 cup oatmeal

Snack 9 A.M.: Bananna and juice

Lunch 12 P.M.: 8 oz yogurt and a turkey sandwich

Dinner 5 P.M.: White meat and veggies

I drink at least 96 oz of water a day

So any help is appreciated.

heathj
05-19-2001, 03:02 PM
Maybe your losing fat and gaining muscle which would account for the slimmer waistline and since muscle weighs more then fat your gaining weight.

Tackleberry
05-19-2001, 03:07 PM
One possibility is that you have gained muscle and muscle weighs more than fat. I have kind of a similar story. i tore up my ankle back on st. patty's day and have just now gotten back to a fairly normal workout routine, but I still can't run. anyways in those 2 months of no cardio, I lost just over 10 pounds, yet I was VERY noticeably "fatter". My g/f even said I looked like a stranger to her. My explanation is that some of my muscle turned to flab (due to not being able to work out as intensely). Thus, I lost weight, but my waist grew.

You may not be losing weight, BUT...if you are getting toned, then you are heading in the right direction. I don't worry so much about my weight as I do my body tone. Hope this helps!

Avatar
05-19-2001, 06:19 PM
Originally posted by Tackleberry
anyways in those 2 months of no cardio, I lost just over 10 pounds, yet I was VERY noticeably "fatter". My g/f even said I looked like a stranger to her. My explanation is that some of my muscle turned to flab (due to not being able to work out as intensely). Thus, I lost weight, but my waist grew.

Muscle can't turn to fat. :rolleyes:

Tackleberry
05-19-2001, 06:27 PM
Originally posted by Avatar

Muscle can't turn to fat. :rolleyes:

Thats just my way of saying I lost muscle and gained bodyfat....next time I'll clarify better. :rolleyes: I do agree with your statement.

Short N Buff
05-19-2001, 11:29 PM
Originally posted by Avatar

Muscle can't turn to fat.

yes it can.
muscle catabolism: muscle->amino acids->carbs
if carbs not used : carbs->fat
It just can't go the other way.

Budiak
05-20-2001, 02:52 AM
Maybe its because you arent eating anything! Look at that diet! Have any of you guys looked at what he's eating? Its like 1000 cals!

Unless that sandwich and that white meat adds up to a pound and a half of turkey, you're just not eating enough. Your body might be holding on to every calorie. It is very possible. A caloric deficit is necessary for weight loss, but not starvation.

Spiderman
05-20-2001, 06:24 AM
For clarification purposes, Avatar was correct with his statement. If muscle is being broken down in the body and turned into glycogen then it WILL be used for energy production. It WON'T get stored as fat. The only time this will occur is when the body is in a major calorie deficit and there are not sufficient carbs to produce energy. Therefore, PLEASE don't say that.... Muscle CAN turn to fat because it can't.
Oh, and good point Budiak. ;)

Anthony
05-20-2001, 06:30 AM
"muscle catabolism: muscle->amino acids->carbs"

Correct me if I am wrong, but muscle catabolism won't happen to any great degree unless your body requires a source of protein. So if your body actually REQUIRES a source of protein and it uses muscle tissue for that source of protein, why would it use more than it needs? I don't understand why your body would break down 2lbs of muscle tissue and only use 1lb immediately, then store the other 1lb as fat. That seems very inefficient.

Also, I have never heard of protein/amino acids turning into carbohydrates. Can you reference your source for this information?

Spiderman
05-20-2001, 06:34 AM
Anthony,
What I think he means is that when in a caloric deficit the body can sometimes use muscle protein as a source of energy. Specifically the process is called Gluconeogenesis. Through this pathway, muscle protein gets broken down into Glycogen (i.e. Carbs) and is used to produce ATP in the body. Hope this clears it up for ya. ;)

Anthony
05-20-2001, 06:47 AM
Thanks spidey, I was just nit picking. :)

kAto
05-20-2001, 06:55 AM
Originally posted by spideyongear
For clarification purposes, Avatar was correct with his statement. If muscle is being broken down in the body and turned into glycogen then it WILL be used for energy production. It WON'T get stored as fat. The only time this will occur is when the body is in a major calorie deficit and there are not sufficient carbs to produce energy. Therefore, PLEASE don't say that.... Muscle CAN turn to fat because it can't.
Oh, and good point Budiak. ;)


well, said, i was just going to reply with the same answer; more or less.


btw, Alliemae, your diet is not very good, you should rethink it, if your trying to diet down, there shouldnt be a double carb meal as a snack, you need to add more portien to you first two meals, females have a hell of a harder roan in dieting then guys cause they cant hold on to muscle as well, so what im suggesting is the CkD, (a diet where you lose very little to no muscle) i dont feel like explaining it all so heres a link to a pretty good explanation, aswell as a sample diet.

btw, ive used this diet and went from 12% to 7% in 3 months, its really good, but takes alot of discipline and meal planning.

http://www.hardbodiessupplements.com/Ketogenicdieting.htm

Frankster
05-20-2001, 07:25 AM
Originally posted by Anthony
"muscle catabolism: muscle->amino acids->carbs"

I don't understand why your body would break down 2lbs of muscle tissue and only use 1lb immediately, then store the other 1lb as fat. That seems very inefficient.


I don't know if there are any scientific evidence that the body cannot do what you just said Anthony, maybe muscle does turn into fat.

Why would i say such a thing? Well, first, our bodies are made to survive, our genes haven't change much in the last couple of thousand years (our bodies are made to survive). So our body COULD turn muscles into fat in periods of starvation in order to survive those periods, because the more muscle you have , the more calories you burn, the faster you die.

To me, catabolising 2 lbs of muscle and use 1 pound emmidiatelly and turn one pound into fat, would seem like a very efficient for the body to insure its survival.

Spiderman
05-20-2001, 08:12 AM
Frankster did you read my posts above at ALL?? :rolleyes:

Frankster
05-20-2001, 08:50 AM
Spidey, maybe you didnt understand what i wrote? :rolleyes:
I know muscles protein can be broken down into glycogen, i am just thinking (i am open minded, i dont just cut and paste from some source of scientific research) what might the body do with that glycogen, why wouldn't it be possible for it to be used as energy and fat deposit? to insure survival.
did you read mine at all Spidey?

Spiderman
05-20-2001, 09:10 AM
Ok, so NOW I'm being accused of copying and pasting?? That is BULL$HIT! I did no such thing and dont' accuse me of it again!! http://cwm.ragesofsanity.com/otn/angry/madgo.gif I DID read what you wrote, and I DO know what I"m talking about! I am an open minded person and I do understand your question here, but muscle is not just turned into fat for survival purposes. As I said before it can be broken down for energy in times of caloric deficit, but it won't be broken down and turned into fat. The body is only going to break down what it needs for energy, it won't catabolize more than it needs. I hope this helps to clarify it for you. :D

Frankster
05-20-2001, 09:18 AM
Originally posted by spideyongear
but muscle is not just turned into fat for survival purposes.As I said before it can be broken down for energy in times of caloric deficit, but it won't be broken down and turned into fat. The body is only going to break down what it needs for energy, it won't catabolize more than it needs. I hope this helps to clarify it for you. :D

WHY ?
That is my question, you don't seem very open minded. ( well not about this at least ) tuttut

Spiderman
05-20-2001, 09:42 AM
The body only breaks down what it needs for physiological processes b/c thats all it needs to use. It has no need to catabolize extra protein just for the hell of it. Carbohydrates are crucial in many other pathways besides that of ATP for muscular action. They also play a large role in brain function. If carbs are not present or in a very low supply the body will go to the muscle tissue. One of the specific Amino Acids it uses in making ATP is Alanine. However, it won't break down more muscle tissue than neccessary because it won't be used. When you eat to much carbs, you know they can be stored as fat if the body has enough of them to use for energy and other proccesses. However, it is very different for muscle. Your body knows what it needs to run smoothly, and thus will only use what it needs. It doesn't WANT to catabolize muscle tissue for to make ATP for brain function, physical energy etc., but it will if forced to.

I'm sorry I got a little angry with you, but I did not appreciate being told that I did some "cut and paste" $hit from a document. This is what I go to school for mate.

Frankster
05-20-2001, 10:09 AM
yeah, im sorry too, shouldnt have said that, i was just ****ed at your little comment with that little :rolleyes:
:)

But i still don't think you undestand what i mean. I mean :
If the body is in a starvation, it will shift into what we could call ''survival mode'', this is the way it has been for thousands of years, it will stop producing muscle tissue ( because the more you had, the more calories you burned, the faster you died ) , it will also decelerate the metabolism, in order to hang on to energy sources for as long as possible. Including bodyfat.

What i am saying is, if the more muscle you have, the more calories you burn, the body, IN STAVATION, will only keep a minimal amount of muscle, in order to spend less energy.

Why would the body not burn, ie, two pounds of muscle and use one pound immediately, and use one pound to store as fat , to USE LESS ENERGY, and store it in a place where it wont cause to use more.
This would seem, to me like a VERY efficient way for the body to survive.

Spiderman
05-20-2001, 10:43 AM
You're right. I did not understand you fully. hmmmmmmmmm....let me think about this a little while.

Cackerot69
05-20-2001, 10:52 AM
Well said, Frankster.

That is EXACTLY what happens when you do cardio in the morning on an empty stomach. It's just not that severe.

Podium Kreatin
05-20-2001, 11:19 AM
muscle can metabolize into fat, especially in a starvation diet (dramatically less than normal), like 1000cal/day

fat is an energy dense macromolecule (most cals/ gram). any macromolecule can be converted into fat cuz fat is just hydrocarbons, and not as complex as other macros. when starving, ur body wants a lot of fat bc it can carry less mass, but the same amt of energy.

after gluconeogenesis, glycogen can turn into fat during starvation. starvation priority is: muscle and brain protein, glycogen, then fat. u burn muscle first, and some turn into glycogen via gluconeogenesis, and is not used. bc it's not used, ur body wants to turn it into fat, cuz fat is like nuclear energy to us; we want to use it as a last resort source

when we starve, we become anabolic (chemically speaking, not necessarily muscle), and our body releases anabolic steroids and hormones to store up chemical energy. dietary protein turns into sth, forgot the name, and carbs turn into fat. the thing that protein turns into is a storage protein, and may turn into fat.

don't get this? think of bears; bears, despite what ppl say, do not hibernate. hibernation is deep, unbreakable sleep. bears sleep, but they wake up. they store almost all their food as fat, and when they sleep, they lose a lot of weight, msucle and fat. almost no carbs in their system. bears also have to wake up a lot during their wintersleep to urinate tons of ammonia (waste product of amino->carbs or fat).

kAto
05-21-2001, 07:21 AM
its funny how posts can so easily go off topic from the original question:rolleyes:

Tryska
06-11-2001, 05:19 PM
Originally posted by Budiak
Maybe its because you arent eating anything! Look at that diet! Have any of you guys looked at what he's eating? Its like 1000 cals!

Unless that sandwich and that white meat adds up to a pound and a half of turkey, you're just not eating enough. Your body might be holding on to every calorie. It is very possible. A caloric deficit is necessary for weight loss, but not starvation.

y'all went way off topic...but to bring it back....that's what I saw. Also...alliemae are you female? (i'm presuming so, but if i'm wrong..sorry!) What about water retention?

I definitely think you need to eat a little more, if not.....that weight-gain problem might could get worse.

been there done that, on my way back.

IceRgrrl
06-23-2001, 07:46 AM
Allie, I would second those who said you may not be eating enough, especially if you're active and working out.

What you described sounds like the typical Female Starvation Diet...unfortunately promoted by women's mags, diet centers, diet books, etc. It's probably fine for middle-aged overweight housewives who are trying to make the change from eating processed/junk food but if you are a relatively in-shape active female, you need a LOT more.

I'm female, 5'10", 147 lbs, 17-19% bf and I eat over 2000 cals a day. If I'm trying to cut down, I usually won't go lower than 1700-1800 or my metabolism just shuts down and resists. Diet sites/books etc. recommend that I eat 1200-1400 to diet...I would pass out by noon!

Sorry if I offended any overweight housewives, but I figured there wouldn't be too many hanging out here ;)

Cackerot69
06-23-2001, 11:42 AM
Anything sound familiar Allie? ;)

Allie
06-24-2001, 04:10 PM
OK OK OK Now that you all have repetativle mentioned that I need to eat more. I can try to work on that.