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MIGHTY DOG
08-20-2002, 04:21 PM
What's the 411 on carbs. Starches and sugars, do we need them. Since there have been alot of reports that carbs can induce fat, and that people are getting fat on carb overdose. Do we still need carbs and is there a way to get the energy we need in out diets without carbs, say from health fats? What's everybody's take on this?

Manveet
08-20-2002, 06:14 PM
read this

http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=67

Natural Animal
08-20-2002, 07:48 PM
Eat your carbs man...this no carbs stuff is dangerous and just plain stupid.

Franjipani
08-20-2002, 08:14 PM
Originally posted by Natural Animal
Eat your carbs man...this no carbs stuff is dangerous and just plain stupid.

:withstupi

BCC
08-20-2002, 08:23 PM
Carbs!!!!? I sure as hell wouldn't be caught eating those!

zwarrior99
08-20-2002, 08:34 PM
Eat carbs!!!!!!! Just for dieting then Keto. But Carbs rock, I would rather take 200g of carbs than 200g of protein.

PowerManDL
08-20-2002, 08:36 PM
Carbs? Those are SO 1996, man.....get with the times.

Feckless
08-20-2002, 09:30 PM
Everybody done giving oh-so-humourous advice?

Here are links to a six-month study done by Duke on the very-low-carb diet.

This is the press release version (http://news.mc.duke.edu/news/article.php?id=5676).

And this is the abstract (http://www.medicinedirect.com/journal/journal/article?acronym=AJM&format=abstract&uid=PIIS0002934302011294).

The complete article can be found in last month's edition (Volume 113) of the American Journal of Medicine.

I note in passing that the study only involved males. I also note that half the participants performed no exercise whatsoever while on the diet (though all participants were encouraged to exercise).

YatesNightBlade
08-21-2002, 02:32 AM
Carbs are good. Feed the machine bro.

Paul Stagg
08-21-2002, 06:20 AM
The human body can operate without dietary carbohydrates, and operate just fine, thank you.

It is NOT the best strategy to gain or maintain muscle mass.

CKDs and TKDs can be used very effectively by many people to drop bodyfat while maintaining muscle. They are NOT the same as the Adkins diet.

The long term health effects are not known, although there is no substantive data showing keto diets to be harmful.

prof
08-21-2002, 08:02 AM
whoa how about a straight answer

I'm eating a BFL style diet is this good or bad, i want to be 200lbs at 10% ish so are you saying get the same amount of calories from only meat and fat ???Help

Puttn
08-21-2002, 08:15 AM
i eat 45% cals from carbs 40% from protein 15% fat

hemants
08-21-2002, 08:51 AM
Your body cannot survive without glucose.

If you eat a low carb diet then your body will derive glucose from protein.

So in essence, there is no such thing as a carb free diet.

Thus, in short, you are better off focusing on eating the right types of carbs rather than cutting them completely (unless you are on a short term specialized diet as Paul Stagg mentioned).

If your job requires a brain, however, ketogenic diets are not very good as brain function is impaired from what I know.

Natural Animal
08-22-2002, 01:09 AM
I will also note:

Bullsh#@t aside...

my mate dropped a bar on himself after trying one of these ridiculous low carb diets.

dont eat carbs= not enuff energy to lift or concentrate lifting = dont get bigger = why bother???

Feckless
08-22-2002, 02:09 AM
Originally posted by hemants
Your body cannot survive without glucose.

If you eat a low carb diet then your body will derive glucose from protein.

So in essence, there is no such thing as a carb free diet.


My body can't survive without blood, too. Does that mean I'm screwed if my diet doesn't contain an adequate amount of blood?

A low-carb diet is one where the dieter consumes a restricted amount of dietary carbohydrates.

That there might be carbohydrates in your body doesn't have any bearing on the diet part of low-carb diet. It's a question of which macronutrients you're ingesting, and in what amounts. That doesn't have much to do with whether your body will derive glucose from protein.

Shocker
08-22-2002, 02:13 AM
without my carbs, i would mostly be worried about not being able to pooh any more.

Kromax
08-22-2002, 04:39 AM
Originally posted by Puttn
i eat 45% cals from carbs 40% from protein 15% fat

Those are my ratios as well.

Tryska
08-22-2002, 05:30 AM
i actually have more trouble poohing with a lot of carbs in my diet.

just thought i'd share.


as for whether you need carbs or not...yes you do need a few. not as much as the average person's diet has in it these days, but you do need some. even on a TKD/CKD, a certain amount of carbs is necessary to get the whole fat-burning process going.

as someone above mentioned the types of carbs you ingest are just as important as the amount of carbs you ingest.

Wizard
08-22-2002, 05:51 AM
Exactly :nod:

You have to find which is the ideal type of carb as well as the amount you ingest. Timing is also very important.

hemants
08-22-2002, 08:09 AM
"My body can't survive without blood, too. Does that mean I'm screwed if my diet doesn't contain an adequate amount of blood?

A low-carb diet is one where the dieter consumes a restricted amount of dietary carbohydrates.

That there might be carbohydrates in your body doesn't have any bearing on the diet part of low-carb diet. It's a question of which macronutrients you're ingesting, and in what amounts. That doesn't have much to do with whether your body will derive glucose from protein."

Not a very good analogy IMO.

The fact is if you are eating more than 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight, the excess will probably be converted into glucose by your body for fuel. This amounts to an expensive way to get your carbohydrates and at the expense of phytochemicals, vitamins, and fibre that ingested carbohydrates provide.

ie. you would have probably been better off ingesting carbohydrates in the first place.

FWIW - Fibre is the key to good poo :)

BCC
08-23-2002, 12:10 AM
Originally posted by Tryska
i actually have more trouble poohing with a lot of carbs in my diet.

just thought i'd share.




What is this you speak of? tuttut girls don't pooh, and I don't wanna think about "what if they did."

ectx
08-23-2002, 01:03 AM
Geez, thankz BCC, now I have a pretty nasty image burned in my head. :eek:

Anyhow, and anybody correct me if I'm wrong, but your brain can basically only use glucose. It is specific in it's energy source and in extreme cases of carbohydrate depletion where protein is broken down for energy (which is extremely metabolically taxing) it can run on ketone bodies, but this decreases mental accuity severely. At least that's what we were told in biochem. Then again, this was energy metabolism from a biotech perspective...although the guy who gave this lecture was one of the profs. responsible for figuring out the kreb cycle. Well, you nutrition folk probably know the answer to this, so please correct me if I'm wrong. What we learn in the lab can be very different from what happens in the real world.

YatesNightBlade
08-23-2002, 03:43 AM
Carbs are good. :D

galileo
08-23-2002, 07:09 AM
Originally posted by ectx
Anyhow, and anybody correct me if I'm wrong, but your brain can basically only use glucose.

Ketones.

Puttn
08-23-2002, 07:13 AM
if you get your carbs earlier in the day and post workout your better off as they are less likeley to turn to fat

unev_en
08-23-2002, 07:33 AM
if you get your carbs earlier in the day and post workout your better off as they are less likeley to turn to fat

Hmmm, didn't know your body came equipped with a carb-clock. What an amazing discovery....

:bang:

prof
08-23-2002, 07:47 AM
Ok so what are we supposed to eat? anyone got a straight answer out there, this is like a bizarre point scoring competition, and the prize for the most points scored is what exactly??

Are you saying just eating fat and protein makes you bigger and more ripped than the traditional BB split?

Tryska
08-23-2002, 08:05 AM
*lmao* @bcc.


you're right. i was just testing to see if anybody caught that. ;)

Wizard
08-23-2002, 08:11 AM
Originally posted by unev_en


Hmmm, didn't know your body came equipped with a carb-clock. What an amazing discovery....

:bang:

:rolleyes:

Puttn's point is valid.

DcK
08-23-2002, 12:24 PM
Originally posted by prof
whoa how about a straight answer

I'm eating a BFL style diet is this good or bad, i want to be 200lbs at 10% ish so are you saying get the same amount of calories from only meat and fat ???Help

BFL is a good program, especially for someone new to dieting or training, IMHO. If you want to be 200lbs, I'm assuming your probably wanting to lose weight??? thus if the BFL program is going a bit slow for you, I'd recommend gradually decreasing the carbs (instead of the 1gC:1gP ratio Bill recommends) and see how your body responds. If you're trying to gain weight, you could do the opposite and up the carb ratio a bit. Stick with the BFL program.

DcK
08-23-2002, 12:26 PM
Originally posted by ectx
Geez, thankz BCC, now I have a pretty nasty image burned in my head. :eek:

Anyhow, and anybody correct me if I'm wrong, but your brain can basically only use glucose. It is specific in it's energy source and in extreme cases of carbohydrate depletion where protein is broken down for energy (which is extremely metabolically taxing) it can run on ketone bodies, but this decreases mental accuity severely. At least that's what we were told in biochem. Then again, this was energy metabolism from a biotech perspective...although the guy who gave this lecture was one of the profs. responsible for figuring out the kreb cycle. Well, you nutrition folk probably know the answer to this, so please correct me if I'm wrong. What we learn in the lab can be very different from what happens in the real world.

Nope, looks pretty accurate to me, the brain prefers glucose, it can survive on ketones however it can decrease mental accuity.

ectx
08-23-2002, 05:33 PM
Thanks man. I actually went back and checked my old biochem textbook too. I guess the ketone bodies would come from beta oxidation of fatty acids. It just seems wise to me to at least include a minimal amount of carbs for glucose.