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View Full Version : incline dumbbell curls---pics



chris mason
08-25-2002, 05:44 PM
Following are a couple of pics of me doing incline dumbbell curl today. I do them second on my routine, behind standing barbell curls.

chris mason
08-25-2002, 05:47 PM
pic 2

chris mason
08-25-2002, 05:48 PM
third

Allen
08-25-2002, 06:17 PM
ok...

JohnCollins
08-25-2002, 06:41 PM
I cannot imagine doing biceps curls with 65# DBs. Ever. I'm proud I just moved up to 20's. . .and I do NOT do them AFTER barbell curls, just seated DBs. . .with 20's. . .*sniff*.

Nice work! :thumbup:

JC

Accipiter
08-25-2002, 06:53 PM
dang you got big arms buddy. I LOVE incline DB curls. My favorite arm exercise hands down

QuadzillaRF
08-25-2002, 06:56 PM
Chris Mason it the next Nasser El Sonbaty!!! Good form and great weight. Do you compete?

chris mason
08-25-2002, 07:34 PM
To be the next Nasser I would need to buy a pharmacy and gain about 60 lbs of lean muscle, but I thank you for the compliment!

MonStar
08-25-2002, 10:09 PM
Damn chris, incredible arm size and strength.

You should put up a picture of your 200 lbs.+ barbell curls and skulls again - I know that you put some up before.

Kayak_boy
08-25-2002, 11:08 PM
You need to sort out your training wardrobe!:p

Black_Curtain
08-26-2002, 05:06 AM
Impressive!

Big Show
08-26-2002, 06:49 AM
WOW!! 60lbs dumbbells:thumbup:

Somebody's been eating his Wheaties



We've seen your arms,legs and back,why not post a pic of the front as well?You know make a complete set

Maki Riddington
08-26-2002, 09:05 AM
Once again, very impressive Chris!

Accipiter
08-26-2002, 09:08 AM
how big are your arms mase?

Bam Bam
08-26-2002, 09:24 AM
Damn!

EdgarMex
08-26-2002, 12:12 PM
That was really something, I can barely hold 60lbs DBs to do my shrugs and you use them to do curls, lol. Great work! :thumbup:

vabeefcake
08-26-2002, 03:51 PM
awsome arms:) Big Bi's are a beautiful thing...i had to stop using the 60+db's since my tendons were feeling it too much, i work in the 40-50 now, but try and work the negatives and it seems to help as i can control the form more postively. I was also introduced to a great polishing move on the cables...using the high grips and doing a bicep curl w/ a very rom(start at 90degrees and basically curl and flex to a 45 degree)..i started w/ 60 for 9 reps on the last rep hold the pump for a 30 count. I then did to sets progressive, working up to 90 on each side and a pump hold for 10 count..its been awhile since my arms were this sore the next day!!
Great work again and mebbe you can share some routines???

GeneticallyGifted
08-26-2002, 03:57 PM
Never cease to amaze Chris. How many reps where you doing there??

GG

chris mason
08-26-2002, 03:57 PM
Thanks, check my journal for what I do. You can also reference the articles I have written for the site and some of my old threads.

As to the weight, I am using strict form on the curls and they are my 2nd exercise.

zwarrior99
08-26-2002, 04:00 PM
good job!

Lettuce Face
08-26-2002, 04:04 PM
That's a pretty weak tan you have there. Why don't you take a day out of your schedule and get out in the sun.

jmays
08-26-2002, 04:14 PM
Good form and weight man.

Spawn_X
08-26-2002, 05:45 PM
thinking of cutting anytime soon?

Also.. how good are those curls? fairly good exercise?

Bigmofo
08-26-2002, 06:52 PM
Awesome

Rock
08-27-2002, 08:06 AM
Chris looking strong, can you put up a picture from when you where as you have stated, at your peak/best, it would be cool.

gino
08-27-2002, 08:13 AM
I like doing those too. I prefer to keep my elbows back though throughout the movement(upper arm perpendicular to floor) to keep more tension on the bicep and it requires I use less weight. That weight is still very impressive though, regardless of form used.

chris mason
08-27-2002, 12:43 PM
Originally posted by Lettuce Face
That's a pretty weak tan you have there. Why don't you take a day out of your schedule and get out in the sun.


I am naturally very fair skinned. I have no interest in a tan because I hope to not die of skin cancer. If I ever competed again, I would get a slight natural tan and then do the rest with dye.

You seem to be a pretty negative guy Lettuce, why not be a little happier?

chris mason
08-27-2002, 12:47 PM
Originally posted by gino
I like doing those too. I prefer to keep my elbows back though throughout the movement(upper arm perpendicular to floor) to keep more tension on the bicep and it requires I use less weight. That weight is still very impressive though, regardless of form used.


Well, to me there is good form, and there is goofy good form. For me, at the end of the movement, I like to lift my shoulder a tad in order to get a better contraction of the biceps. As you probably know, you cannot achieve as strong a contraction of your biceps with your upper arm perpindicular to the floor.

Post a picture of how you do them, I am curious to see where your arm is at the top of the movement.

gino
08-27-2002, 12:59 PM
Originally posted by chris mason



Well, to me there is good form, and there is goofy good form. For me, at the end of the movement, I like to lift my shoulder a tad in order to get a better contraction of the biceps. As you probably know, you cannot achieve as strong a contraction of your biceps with your upper arm perpindicular to the floor.

Post a picture of how you do them, I am curious to see where your arm is at the top of the movement.

Why can't you get as good a contraction? Where your upper arm ends up in relation to your lower arm determines the "degree of contraction," right? As far as I knew, the more perpendicular to the floor your upper arm is, the more intense the contracition. Although it doesn't appear you do this, I see many guys bring their elbows forward like you and completely relax their biceps at the top of the movement(full contraction position). Keeping your elbows back and lower arms perpendicular to the floor throughout the movement doesn't allow you to do this.

I won't be bringing a camera to Golds with me, but I'll get creative and see how else I can show you...maybe on a kitchen chair with a jug of milk or something.

chris mason
08-27-2002, 01:08 PM
It is anatomy. A little experiment. Take your right arm and lift it directly over your head. Make it go as far back behind you as possible. Contract your biceps. You should actually be able to cramp your arm. You will get the most intense biceps contraction you have ever had. Now, repeat with your upper arm perpindicular to the floor (as in the dumbbell curl).

Why not bring a camera to the gym? You only need take one photo. Just go right before closing or something.

gino
08-27-2002, 01:18 PM
I feel a very slight difference from one position to another, but not enough to warrant changing my style. Perhaps the difference is greater for you, which is entirely possible. For me the temptation of allowing the bicep to relax at the top of the movement is too great, however voluntary or involuntary it may be. As the dumbell moves up and the elbow forward, the weight is getting easier to pull because of the migration of the weight over the elbow rather than next to it.

gino
08-27-2002, 01:20 PM
As far as the camera thing, no I won't be taking it to golds. My workout time is 6:30, my gym closes at 10, and I work out alone. I'm not changing my workout time(for nutritional reasons), and I'm not asking a stranger at the gym to take a picture of me.

chris mason
08-27-2002, 01:21 PM
You feel a very slight difference??? You must be doing it incorrectly.

Anyone else reading this thread give it a go and let me know.

Maybe I misdescribed it. When you flex over your head, your forearm should be perpindicular to your body as you flex.

Rock
08-27-2002, 01:29 PM
can you post some pictures of you in competiton form Mr.Mason, it would be cool.

gino
08-27-2002, 01:39 PM
Originally posted by chris mason
You feel a very slight difference??? You must be doing it incorrectly.

Anyone else reading this thread give it a go and let me know.

Maybe I misdescribed it. When you flex over your head, your forearm should be perpindicular to your body as you flex.

No, I totally understand what you mean - as if I were doing a single arm overhead dumbell extension, but flexing the bicep when the arm is bent(supinated). I honestly don't feel much of a difference though.

And in all honesty, I used to do bicep curls bringing the elbow forward like that for years, but switched to my current style and found it suited me better. It was tougher and it required I use less weight, which was a blow to the ego, but it gave me good results and allowed me to cut a couple sets off the bicep workout.

jeep4414
08-27-2002, 01:41 PM
Chris is right...one of the two heads attaches to the scapula, whereas the other attaches just above the top of the humerus. With the elbow up, that part of the muscle will shorten more than if the elbow is down at the side, or back even, while doing incline curls. As a matter of fact, during incline curls, that part is super-stretched out.

That is part of the reason you do "arm flexor" exercises with the elbows in different positions relative to the body, so that not only do you load the muscle differently, but you have it in a different state "length" (can't think of the right term).

This happens with many of the multi-jointed muscles. Just like the biceps brachii are most flexed with the hand supinated & elbow next to your ear, the triceps is more flexed down and to the side.

I generally try to do bicep and tricep exercises with the elbow in 2-3 different positions for this reason. (when I do biceps). Once upon a time I remember doing 60s, dunno about 65s. Very nice!!!

Here's a note I wrote a while back:

********
http://www3.kumc.edu/aamsa/subjects/Anatomy/tables/arm%20Muscles.doc

At the upper end of the biceps, the Long head attaches on top at the supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula (top of the shoulder) The Short head attaches at the tip of coracoid process of scapula.

Basically, what this means is that the higher you lift your arm, relative to your body (the closer your elbow is to your ear) the shorter the bicep will be, especially the long head. Perhaps more importantly is knowing that at different arm angles, and whether or not your grip is supinated, neutral or pronated, you can work the muscle group in different ways. There are at least 12 basic ways: elbows at side, elbows in front, elbows raised, and compound (as in a pullup or row) all with a pronated, neutral, or supinated or compound) grip for each of the three, I typically try to hit 3 of the 9 basic ways on a big bicep day, 1 or 2 of the 9 on a quicky day. Incidentally, triceps is also a 2-joint muscle, but is not involved in forearm rotation, so there are 4 basic: elbows at side, in front, overhead, and compound (such as a close-grip press). Grip only affects the forearms and leverage.

http://www3.kumc.edu/aamsa/subjects/Anatomy/tables/arm%20Muscles.doc

http://www.esportmed.com/smrn/content/viewnotes.cfm?aid=6

http://pilant2.tamu.edu/smartlib/Courses/166H/gtt1803/public_html/shoulder.html

********

Blood&Iron
08-27-2002, 01:44 PM
Originally posted by gino

And in all honesty, I used to do bicep curls bringing the elbow forward like that for years, but switched to my current style and found it suited me better. It was tougher and it required I use less weight, which was a blow to the ego, but it gave me good results and allowed me to cut a couple sets off the bicep workout.
I prefer doing them this way too for the reasons you list and the fact that when you keep the upper arm motionless/static it is in a stretched position, which increases tension(of course if you can use more weight the other way, that increases tension too, so perhaps it's a moot point) Anyways, you're not alone.

Fuel
08-27-2002, 02:49 PM
there is no reason to do this exercise and worry about getting an extreme contraction at the same time. maybe preachers.....

contracting the muscle to an extereme point during a set is counterproductive. it could be done after your working sets are finished or maybe at the end of a hard working set, but to do them DURING a working set merely takes too much energy away while trying to perform the motion, which is the main goal.

this is assuming contracting really hard does anything at all.

contracting really hard: upper arm does not move in relation to lower arm = no ROM. also, the only reason contracting would end in hypertrophy is because it is a form of resistance. i would rather use weight as resistance than my own limb.

this post is about people who really care a lot about that intense contraction. nothing wrong with moving the arm for full ROM, something very wrong with sacrificing energy in movement for contracting.

chris mason
08-29-2002, 05:47 PM
I've trained with every kind of form imaginable, from very strict to very loose. As I age, I find that I need to steer towards the stricter form in order to keep my joints happy.

The point of a forced contraction at the top of a dumbbell curl is that you are creating resistance where there is very little. The biceps and other muscles involved in a dumbbell curl are doing very little at the top of the movement due to gravity and the position of the dumbbell relative to it. Thus, consciously flexing the biceps keeps them from relaxing (relatively).

Of course, you can build big arms either way. I do feel that there is a fine line between excessively strict and loose form, and that "line" creates optimal training stimulus.

gino
09-01-2002, 01:02 PM
I agree with that. I usually tend to lean towards the more strict side of that line though. I've had success both ways. When I train for functional strength(football), I'll use a little looser form and more weight, while if I'm training for target muscle stimulation(bodybuilding), I put more emphasis on form. The great thing about incline bench curls, is that unless you are relaxing your bicep at the top, there is very little you can do to cheat the weight up. Great exercise.

the doc
09-01-2002, 01:15 PM
mason, you are one big mofo!

Would you and gino agree that incline db curl is preferred to standingcurls?

BCC
09-01-2002, 01:35 PM
Originally posted by chris mason
You feel a very slight difference??? You must be doing it incorrectly.

Anyone else reading this thread give it a go and let me know.

Maybe I misdescribed it. When you flex over your head, your forearm should be perpindicular to your body as you flex.

Chris is correct here. If you look at Nautilus's new bicep machine, your arms are in this exact position practically behind your head with you chin burried into your chest.

gino
09-01-2002, 03:22 PM
Originally posted by BigChaseyChase


...If you look at Nautilus's new bicep machine, your arms are in this exact position practically behind your head with you chin burried into your chest.

...and then there's the new cybex, in which your arms are at your sides...

I'm not really sure doc... I do both. I usually do 3 sets of seated dumbell curls first and then 2 sets of standing barbell curls. I really like doing dumbell hammer curls on the incline bench, both arms at the same time. Those are tough.

BCC
09-01-2002, 04:07 PM
hmmmm but cybex makes crap...

chris mason
09-03-2002, 05:56 PM
I think Arthur Jones always considered Cybex to be a cheap knockoff of Nautilus, and to be crap as Chasey put it.

Anyway, thanks Doc. For myself, I have always preferred standing barbell curls as the cornerstone of my biceps training.

the doc
09-03-2002, 07:37 PM
thanks fellas

Rabid Wolverine
09-04-2002, 03:49 AM
hi Chris, I noticed you alternate each curl; do you think this is better than simultaneous or is it just a personal preference? thanks...

RW

chris mason
09-06-2002, 06:41 PM
Just personal preference.