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BLUENOSER
06-12-2001, 07:09 AM
Does anyone have a list of complex carbs. I think I know a few of them but if someone could add to my list I would greatly appreciate it.

whole wheat bread
oatmeal
potatoes
sweet potatoes
whole wheat pasta
cream of wheat
whole grain breads

YatesNightBlade
06-12-2001, 07:17 AM
rice

Tryska
06-12-2001, 07:19 AM
Technically, I wouldn't count potatoes as complex carbs.

Also.....most fresh veggies are considered complex, particulary greens, celery, and other high fiber veggies.

Brown Rice, bulgur wheat, barley, other whole grains.

and this is a bit unorthodox but I would also add beans, although they are considered proteins, they also have pretty high fiber levels.

BLUENOSER
06-12-2001, 07:35 AM
Thanks Tryska, I was getting tired of eating the same food everyday. I was not sure if "green" veggies were included in the list of complex carbs.

Tryska
06-12-2001, 07:40 AM
Well by my rule of thumb.....which might get shot down,

if it's a carb, but not starchy and not sweet, i rule it as a complex carb.

yw though...:)

BLUENOSER
06-12-2001, 07:56 AM
So things like peas and corn would not be considered complex carbs.
Why is sweet potato included and not white potatoes, is it because of the starch in the white or the GI level (you would think that sweet potato would have a higher GI level, given the name of it).

Tryska
06-12-2001, 07:59 AM
It's a toss up really....but sweet potatoes have lots of fiber and loads of beta carotene and vit. A. So they are good, whereas potatoes, are a bit nutritionally bankrupt, unless you eat the skin.

plus they can solve a sugar craving in a clean way....roast one up add a scopp of cottage cheese and you're set. or at least I am.

breeze
06-12-2001, 08:41 AM
Don't forget to add plantains, cassava and nuts.

Tryska
06-12-2001, 08:42 AM
wouldn't plantains be along the lines of bananas though? more simple and starchy then complex?

don't get me wrong..I love them and eat them, but still.

Alex.V
06-12-2001, 09:07 AM
Plantains have a lower GI than bananas, AFAIK. But I'm not sure.

Oat Bran and rice bran cereals, whole wheat pasta, and wheat germ are other good ones.

breeze
06-12-2001, 09:44 AM
Plantains and bananas are closely related. But you can use green plantains. Green plantains have a low GI. Another thing bananas are not as bad as people think. Bananas only have 35 calories, and a GI of 75. Brown rice has a GI of 70.

Joe Black
06-12-2001, 09:52 AM
erm I thought the average banana has 20 carbs, thats 80 calories..

Alex.V
06-12-2001, 10:13 AM
That's for itty-bitty british bananas.

American bananas are much larger. 120 calories or so for one that's decent-sized (8"-10")

:D

BLUENOSER
06-12-2001, 10:13 AM
Am I right to say that any carb with a low GI can be counted as a complex carb, and if so is there a defined GI number?

Tryska
06-12-2001, 10:15 AM
Originally posted by Belial
That's for itty-bitty british bananas.

American bananas are much larger. 120 calories or so for one that's decent-sized (8"-10")

:D

from what I understand though, Bananas from Texas are the biggest. Or at least that's what the Texans say....;)

breeze
06-12-2001, 10:25 AM
This site lists all of the foods that were scientifically studied for their GI index. There are two index listed, one that used white bread as the base, and the other that uses some other sugar.
www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm

breeze
06-12-2001, 10:30 AM
Oh yeah, just to clarify. My comment about bananas was based on a 1 ounce banana.

benchmaniac2
06-25-2001, 08:24 AM
I thought that all starch were complex carbs????:confused:

Tryska
06-25-2001, 08:30 AM
not so my friend.

actually starches would be considered simple carbs, if i've not mistaken....they easily break down to simple sugars and have higher GI ratings.

benchmaniac2
06-25-2001, 08:34 AM
so when you look at the nutritional info on a box of cereal, and it says the amount of starch and sugars, how can you tell if it is a good carbohydrate or not?

Tryska
06-25-2001, 08:36 AM
Well.....i'm guessing the first 1 ingredient is a whole grain product, and if the fiber grams are high.

really the best cereals out there are oatmeal and multigrains..the kind that you cook. at least in my opinion.:)

Wizard
06-25-2001, 09:14 AM
I totally agree with Tryska.Carbs that have a high gi should be considered as simple carbs.People can't understand a simple thing:The difference between a complex carb and a simple carb is that you burn more cals while digesting the complex.But it's more preferable to have sustained energy(which is promoted by low gi carbs) than to have high insulin and blood sugar levels.

the doc
06-25-2001, 10:01 AM
I very much disagree with the last several posts :)

its very very simple. according to the definitions

complex carb= starchy carb (includes fibre although it is undigestable)

everything else (especially GI) is irrelevant to this discussion.

once again, GI has nothing to do with this distiction. tuttut
Starches are not considered simple carbs. All carbs regardless of their complexity are broken down into simple sugars (glucose or one of the other hexose or pentoses).

Look at the nutrition label. Subtract sugars from total carbs and this = the amt of complex carbs

Tryska
06-25-2001, 10:04 AM
Yeah but i think the amount of work needed to break a carb down into simple sugars, need to be taken into account.


I mean: oatmeal v grits.

oatmeal is gonna win, in my book as the better choice, because it doesn't break down as fast, leaving you full longer with no funky insulin crashes.

Alex.V
06-25-2001, 10:06 AM
I think there was an error in the original question. Complex carbs alone aren't desireable. (i.e., maltodextrin). Neither are low GI carbs. (i.e., fructose).

The ideal food is low GI AND complex, which is what I think we're discussing here.

Wizard
06-25-2001, 10:27 AM
complex carb= starchy carb (includes fibre although it is undigestable)
the doc,are you kiddin'?
as example,a potato has any fibre?allmost no!that's why it has a very high gi.A sweet potato has a moderate gi because it has a considerable amount of fibre.
ANd,I didn't support that starches are simple carbs.I said that it's preferable to eat low gi simple sugars(no fructose though)than hi gi comlex carbs.So,to me,a potato doesn't count as a comlpex carb.(allthough I admet that it burns more calories to digest)

benchmaniac2
06-26-2001, 11:13 AM
doh..im confused again

So if a carb has fibre in it, does that make it complex???

the doc
06-26-2001, 12:19 PM
benchmaniac, most high fibre foods contain a majority of complex carbs.

alpha, i'm very very serious.
In some respects i was also referreing to tryskas post as well.

Bottom line- complex carb = any carb that is not a simple sugar (ie mono- or di- saccaride) or sugar alcohol, or glycerol.

Complex carbs= many, many sugar units linked together by glycosidic linkages (ie oligo- or polysaccarides). This includes starches. Fibre is a polysaccaride and is essentially an undigestable starch.

Most foods contain a mix of simple sugars and complex. A potato is the perfect example-part sugar, but mostly starch. Thus to say a food is complex is not completely true. It may contain a majority of carbs in complex forms, but most if not all natural whole foods contain at least some mixture of the two

GI has absolutely nothing to do with complex vs simple. Indeed many complex carbs have a very high gi (consider malto- a 100% complex carb). Many simple sugars have a very low GI (consider fructose or lactose).
alpha, please do not bring this up anymore as gi has absolutely no relevance to this discussion.
please don't confuse these seperate issues.

breeze
06-26-2001, 01:02 PM
Blackalpha sorry to disappoint ya, but a 1 ounce boiled potato with its skin has as much fiber as 1 ounce boiled brown rice.

Anthony
06-26-2001, 01:10 PM
The GI rating has nothing to do with whether a carb is complex or simple. And starch is definitely considered a complex carb.

Tryska
06-26-2001, 01:16 PM
okay...so a potato is a complex carb. it still sucks as a complex carb choice in my book. i count it as a simple.

but that's just me, and i'm not the nitpicky kind.;)

breeze
06-26-2001, 01:26 PM
Here is a comparsion between 1 oz potato boiled with skin without salt, and 1 oz brown rice boiled.

Food 1-RICE-BROWN-LONG-CKD -1:1 oz
Food 2-POTATO-FLSH-BLD W/SK -1:1 oz

Nutri Food 1 Food 2
-----------+--------+--------
Calories 31.47 24.66
Pro (g) 0.74 0.54
Fat (g) 0.26 0.03
Carb (g) 6.52 5.7
Fiber (g) 0.51 0.51
Cal (mg) 2.84 1.42
Iron (mg) 0.11 0.09
Na (mg) 1.42 1.13
Pot (mg) 12.19 107.45
Phos (mg) 23.53 12.47
Ash (g) 0.14 0.26
vitA (IU) 0 0
vitC (mg) 0 3.69
Thia (mg) 0.03 0.03
Ribo (mg) 0.01 0.01
Nia (mg) 0.43 0.41
H2O % 73.1 77
satF (g) 0.05 0.01
monoF (g) 0.09 0
polyF (g) 0.09 0.01
Chol (mg) 0 0

As you can see the potato is loaded with good stuff.

Anthony
06-26-2001, 01:30 PM
Why does it suck as a complex carb choice?

The GI rating (glucose based rating) for a steamed white potatoe is 65, while a sweet potatoe is 54. Enough difference to worry about or denounce potatoes all together? Not really. I do agree that yams and sweet potatoes are more calorie dense and contain more nutrients, but potatoes are still an excellent choice for complex carbs. Besides, so many things affect the GI ratings and nutrient value (how the food was prepared, temperature, combinations of other foods being consumed at same time, etc).

Tryska
06-26-2001, 01:36 PM
actually..i have nothing against potatoes as a food. just like i have nothing against ice cream. but for me, white potatoes tend to make me sleepy.....so during the day, i would much rather get my carbs from brown rice, whole wheat pasta, etc, the low GI choices....and eat regular potatoes usually post workout. a few hours before bed time, so my crash isn't as annoying.

this is, again..JUST ME though. so for ME, when it comes to complex v simple, it's a matter of what makes me crash and what doesn't. and potatoes make me crash. and lord knows I'm a freak, so we won't even go there.:)

breeze
06-26-2001, 01:51 PM
Ahh Tryska, how does potato and freak end up in the same sentence. Damn girl you are a freak.

Tryska
06-26-2001, 02:04 PM
It's a rare talent.:p

the doc
06-26-2001, 03:17 PM
Originally posted by breeze
Here is a comparsion between 1 oz potato boiled with skin without salt, and 1 oz brown rice boiled.

Food 1-RICE-BROWN-LONG-CKD -1:1 oz
Food 2-POTATO-FLSH-BLD W/SK -1:1 oz

Nutri Food 1 Food 2
-----------+--------+--------
Calories 31.47 24.66
Pro (g) 0.74 0.54
Fat (g) 0.26 0.03
Carb (g) 6.52 5.7
Fiber (g) 0.51 0.51
Cal (mg) 2.84 1.42
Iron (mg) 0.11 0.09
Na (mg) 1.42 1.13
Pot (mg) 12.19 107.45
Phos (mg) 23.53 12.47
Ash (g) 0.14 0.26
vitA (IU) 0 0
vitC (mg) 0 3.69
Thia (mg) 0.03 0.03
Ribo (mg) 0.01 0.01
Nia (mg) 0.43 0.41
H2O % 73.1 77
satF (g) 0.05 0.01
monoF (g) 0.09 0
polyF (g) 0.09 0.01
Chol (mg) 0 0

As you can see the potato is loaded with good stuff.

Holy potassium latman, i mean batman~!

Anthony, great to see you back!

Taras
06-26-2001, 05:49 PM
I have to agree with the Doc re definition of simple vs complex carbs. Also, Anthony made a good point about the GI of a carb being influenced by the other food that you're eating. For example, if you eat a potato along with a chicken breast and put some butter on the potato, the GI will be lower than if you just eat a potato all by itself on an empty stomach.

Wizard
06-27-2001, 08:51 AM
Blackalpha sorry to disappoint ya, but a 1 ounce boiled potato with its skin has as much fiber as 1 ounce boiled brown rice.
Sure you disapointed me cause I never eat potatos with skin.

I have to agree with the Doc re definition of simple vs complex carbs. Also, Anthony made a good point about the GI of a carb being influenced by the other food that you're eating. For example, if you eat a potato along with a chicken breast and put some butter on the potato, the GI will be lower than if you just eat a potato all by itself on an empty stomach.
Saturated fats like butter tend to rise insulin levels!Only unsaturated lower a lot insulin levels.Also,protein by its self rises insulin levels but it aids in the release of glucagon which slowly lowers insulin levels.

okay...so a potato is a complex carb. it still sucks as a complex carb choice in my book. i count it as a simple
That's my point too.

Chris Rodgers
06-27-2001, 09:28 AM
Originally posted by the doc


Holy potassium latman, i mean batman~!



:D