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prof
10-09-2002, 05:08 AM
I'm eating low GI foods all the time apart from post training, trouble is I am sooo tired in the mornings, would some higher GI foods help pick me up?

currently eat, 2 scoops whey with cup of oats blended in, quick and tastes OK, gulp of flax oil/olive oil and 5 eggs,2 whole with some cheese scrambled, but still walking round like a zombie

Oh Tryska, had thyroid checked allready, lol

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-09-2002, 05:13 AM
Originally posted by prof
I'm eating low GI foods all the time apart from post training, trouble is I am sooo tired in the mornings, would some higher GI foods help pick me up?

currently eat, 2 scoops whey with cup of oats blended in, quick and tastes OK, gulp of flax oil/olive oil and 5 eggs,2 whole with some cheese scrambled, but still walking round like a zombie

Oh Tryska, had thyroid checked allready, lol

It may help for the first 30-60 minutes, but after that, falling insulin levels will make you feel worse.

Not to mention that 'spiked' insulin aids in fascilitating tryptophan (seritonnin precursor) through the blood brain barrier (basically by wiping out it's competition).

So you have a quick perk of energy, sure, but then you have the grogginess from falling insulin levels and the potential lethargy from a possible increase in seritonnin. You'll probably end up worse than you were previously.

It may be other problems, like are you getting enough sleep? Are you overtrained? Have you lost motivation?

prof
10-09-2002, 05:19 AM
CD

cheers, no other real problems, overtraining is unlikely, decently hydrated, gym motivation is high, but work less so, but not really a problem, so stick to low GI then. Been to the doctors and said I'm permanantly knackered, had a few blood tests and all was ok but don't know exactly what they tested for. Think test levels are OK (totally nat) went to bed at 10 and got up at 8.30 so don't think it's too little sleep. Any other ideas?

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-09-2002, 05:26 AM
Are you cutting or 'gaining'? and for how long so far?

What supps are you using?

And are you getting enough vits and minerals?

prof
10-09-2002, 05:29 AM
bulking, just had 1 month off, holiday etc so should be "recharged" just using whey with glutamine,glucose after training, thats about it, 170lbs @ 14%ish 1g c vit and 1 multivit,

Tryska
10-09-2002, 05:32 AM
baha at thyroid.

anyways.....waking up tired isn't right. your either not getting enough sleep, or not getting quality sleep (sleep apnea?)

i agree with chigs that high GI meal first thing isn't the best idea. Have ya tried caffeine in the morning?

I usually do protein/fat first thing in the morning, and then low gi carbs for midmorning.

prof
10-09-2002, 09:06 AM
"Not to mention that 'spiked' insulin aids in fascilitating tryptophan (seritonnin precursor) through the blood brain barrier (basically by wiping out it's competition)."

any chance you could explain in english, as I said I'm a bit tired, like they might explain on Newsround eh!

using caffein, but would rather not,

cheers you guys

gino
10-09-2002, 09:20 AM
I like to have a moderately high GI food in the morning and some fast acting whey protein. Usually, it's fruit and whey protein. The fruit sugar helps me get going a bit until I get that first cup of coffee. You're probably wondering why whey first thing in the morning right? Here's the rationale - common sense really with regards to nutrition... By the time you wake up, you haven't consumed any protein in several hours, so amino acid levels in your body are likely lower than usual, so it's best to get protein to work its magic as soon as possible. For this reason, get some whey, because nothing works more quickly. Just make sure to get some whole food protein 1-1/2 to 2 hours later, because since it is fast acting, amino acid levels will drop relatively soon after ingestion.

prof
10-09-2002, 09:27 AM
I used whey 1st thing for the same reasons Gino said, also had eggs as I thought they were slower absorbing, so I'd get instant protein and then some a bit later all from one meal. What do you think add in some fruit? and should I not take flax and whey at the same time?

gino
10-09-2002, 09:39 AM
I wouldn't recommend flax first thing in the morning because of the chance it may slow the absorption of protein. Have it with your second meal and before bed.

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-09-2002, 04:52 PM
Originally posted by prof
"Not to mention that 'spiked' insulin aids in fascilitating tryptophan (seritonnin precursor) through the blood brain barrier (basically by wiping out it's competition)."

any chance you could explain in english, as I said I'm a bit tired, like they might explain on Newsround eh!



there's like five amino acids that compete for entry via the blood brain barrier. One of them is tryptophan, the precursor to seritonnin (i.e. it gets converted into seritonnin). Only so many can go through at any one time.

When insulin is released into the blood stream, it removes nutrients including amino acids like the other four competing aminos. Tryptophan, however, is bounded to an albumen protein and so can't be transported by insulin.

So insulin removes all the competition and the tryptophan has an easy passage through.

prof
10-10-2002, 10:39 AM
like, Thanks for that , so trytophan is stuck to the egg protein....er help think I better change my name, to thicko instead of Prof, I can explain the dendritic structure of steel etc, this is not my field, my brain gone hurty now,

Tryska
10-10-2002, 10:41 AM
Originally posted by The_Chicken_Daddy



aminos. Tryptophan, however, is bounded to an albumen protein



"bounded"???


don't feel stupid prof. jsut cuz he knows his way around a protein doesn't means his grasp on the english language isn't tenuous at best. ;)

prof
10-10-2002, 10:48 AM
Well he is from the TOON whereas I'm a sophisticated Whitley Bay fella myself (lol) I spend a lot of time trying to explain complex stuff to students, quite fun really, particularly if you think a bit laterally. Used some animated pictures of cows in a lecture about perspective drawing today, probably the only bit they'll remember. Anyhoo how about spot the dog explains amino acid control systems article for people like me

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-10-2002, 10:51 AM
It's true. I speak Geordie, not English. Seriously, ask anyone who's spoken with me (Cloughie, Fran, Sav and even Mystic Eric! Hopefulyl Yatesy too by the end of the weekend).

Thanks Miss Grammarian. "Bound".

The protein is too big for insulin to bind with it, so it basically just leaves it and takes the rest (or some of them anyway), so less competition with tryptophan across the blood brain barrier means more tryptophan gets through and there's a more likely chance of more seritonnin conversion.

So you feel groggy.

And stuff.

High sugar-induced comatose state can be quite relaxing sometimes, though.

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-10-2002, 10:56 AM
Originally posted by prof
Well he is from the TOON whereas I'm a sophisticated Whitley Bay fella myself (lol) I spend a lot of time trying to explain complex stuff to students, quite fun really, particularly if you think a bit laterally. Used some animated pictures of cows in a lecture about perspective drawing today, probably the only bit they'll remember. Anyhoo how about spot the dog explains amino acid control systems article for people like me

You're from Shitley?



Anyhoo, spot = insulin.

Spot likes bones (nutrients like amino acids).

He takes them and buries them in the ground (transports the nutrients to where they are needed e.g. cells, including muscle cells).

There's one sweet-ass bone he'd really like to take (tryptophan) but it's covered in mud (bound to protein) and since he's really picky, he just leaves it. Cause he's a puff.

I have absolutely no idea what analogy to use for this sweet-ass bone to travel through the blood brain barrier. But surely you get the gist by now?

prof
10-10-2002, 11:03 AM
bahahah this is great, please continue, if only all lectures were like that how much fun would uni be eh! Cmon more

are all proteins too big?

from Whitley, now in the midlands so it'snot all progress

prof
10-10-2002, 11:05 AM
Tell you what I'm scared by a "sweet ass bone" sounds like a film with john Holmes

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-10-2002, 11:18 AM
Originally posted by prof
are all proteins too big?

from Whitley, now in the midlands so it'snot all progress

Poor you. Moving from one scumhole to another ;)


Well insulin carries aminos or glucose (or FFAs), these are our bones.

Usually these bones are connected when Spot is trying to get at them.

(i.e. aminos are chains called proteins ['dipeptides' i.e. 'two aminos' or 'tripeptides' i.e. 'three aminos' or 'polypeptides' i.e. 'many aminos'] and glucose [called a 'monosacharide'] is chained to form disacharides [i.e. 'two sugars'] or polysacharides ['many sugars'])

You eat food, which contains protein, carbs etc.. but unless you're eating amino acid tablets or straight glucose (dextrose), they need to be broken down.

Spot has a good doggy friend called Gnasher (our digestive system) who breaks down these bones for good ol' Spot. That way, he can get at them easily (they can pass through the intestinal walls and get into the blood stream where insulin can get at them).

Then Spot takes the bones to where they are needed, where bone-synthesis (protein synthesis) can take place using these bones as 'building blocks' or using the bones as energy to fuel various metabolic processes.

So Spot (insulin) can't grab onto bones (aminos) if they're muddy (bound to a protein) because he's a puff (the receptor sites don't match).

Yanick
10-10-2002, 01:10 PM
LMAO! This is the funniest thread i have ever read.

Holto
10-10-2002, 01:48 PM
and informative for some

prof
10-11-2002, 03:15 AM
tune in next week spot isolates different parts of his pecs....aaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggghhhhhhhh


No really, excellent stuff think it's starting to sink in, Ta for your time CD