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Carstondrummer
10-15-2002, 10:24 PM
I've been weight training heavily for a couple months now and have altered my diet. I try to eat every 3-4 hours to keep the metabolism going. Sometimes, my next meal comes right before I'm about to go to bed. Is this bad to eat right before going to bed? Also, I try to make this last meal high in protein, about 30 grams of protein. (2500 cal diet: 60% carb, 30% protein, 10% fat) Thanks.

Shao-LiN
10-15-2002, 10:49 PM
It's ideal if you get a good protein meal before you sleep. I'd probably up the fat levels in your diet.

Manveet
10-15-2002, 11:07 PM
Eating before bed is fine. Alot of people will tell you it's bad or having carbs before bed is bad because it will all be stored as fact etc.. I would go with some slow releasing protein, like casein. So egg whites, and milk are good options.

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-16-2002, 05:45 AM
Originally posted by Manveet
Alot of people will tell you it's bad or having carbs before bed is bad because it will all be stored as fact etc..

Yeah, which rarely happens.

Smitty
10-16-2002, 05:56 AM
Originally posted by The_Chicken_Daddy


Yeah, which rarely happens.

So what exactly happens to these Carbs then, coz you're not likely to be burning all of them while asleep ?

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-16-2002, 06:14 AM
Glycogen storage in liver and muscle.
thermogenesis.
Energy use.
Conversion to fat.

Not necessarily in that order though.


Conversion to fat is dependant on loads of things, like hormones, activity levels, amount of calories in the meal and all sorts of shi t.

At the end of the day, if you're in a 500kcal deficit and you eat all your carbs before bed you can still drop fat. Albeit probably because by this time your glycogen stores will have depleted somewhat so most would go there.

It all comes down to a 24 hour calorie balance, and a bunch of other not-as-significant stuff.


Besides, since cortisol is higher in the mornings, it may be a beneficial idea to eat carbs to combat this a bit.

Insulin sensitivty is lower in the mornings too, due to more FFA's floating around. Which isn't necessarily bad from a fat loss point of view, (or a muscle gain point of view really, but in general when in calorie surplus you want to be more insulin sensitive) but eating carbs before bed can prevent this FA release so increase insulin sensitivity.

Well isn't that interesting?

BennettBoy
10-16-2002, 07:11 AM
Originally posted by The_Chicken_Daddy
It all comes down to a 24 hour calorie balance, and a bunch of other not-as-significant stuff.



:nod: But many still simply cannot grasp the simplicity of this and overcomplicate the **** out of all this:D

Smitty
10-16-2002, 09:37 AM
Im a believer of the total cals deficeit = weight loss, but if you are not losing weight (bulking up or just maintaining), surely it is not a good idea having a load of carbs before going to sleep. Sure you might top-up your glycogen store, but you're not going to use as much of them for energy as when you are active and awake, so more will be stored as fat than if you ate the carbs in the morning.

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-16-2002, 09:51 AM
Originally posted by Smitty
Im a believer of the total cals deficeit = weight loss, but if you are not losing weight (bulking up or just maintaining), surely it is not a good idea having a load of carbs before going to sleep. Sure you might top-up your glycogen store, but you're not going to use as much of them for energy as when you are active and awake, so more will be stored as fat than if you ate the carbs in the morning.

yeah, it was just an example. I'm not saying eat a bunch of carbs before bed.

I'm saying eat several well balanced meals throughout the day (post workout maybe being the exception of 'balanced').


If you eat more calories than you burn, you'll gain weight. It's up to you via food manipulation, calorie partitioning and good weight training to determine how much of that weight gained is muscle and how much is fat.

Naturally, you want a higher muscle to fat gained ratio.

You can achieve this via small body weight increments each week, optimal selections of food sources and progressive lifting.

Avatar
10-16-2002, 10:57 AM
Robboe pretty much summed it up.

I'm eating carbs before bed a lot of nights lately and in the mornings I'm either looking leaner or heavier depending on the total amount of calories I consumed the previous day, not what I consumed only before bed.