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GonePostal
10-23-2002, 01:17 AM
2 questions
1. To counter act a High GI food (also for convience when you only have access to high GI foods) can the consumption of this food be done over a period of time in small quantities. Like when eattin cookies or something. Just eat one every hour or so. Or having some orange juice that you sip on during the day.

2. Does tuna conatain EFA's? Also is it a good source of EFA's?

Thanks for the help...

Ritzol
10-23-2002, 01:48 AM
tuna has what like .5 grams fat per serving? I tend to think........no, not an efa source.

How about pb? mmmmmmmmm yummy

As for the first question, I'm as clueless as can be

YatesNightBlade
10-23-2002, 02:57 AM
You'd still raise your blood sugar too quickly and probably feel the effects of a "crash" quite often. Once in a while it's not going to be a problem, but you should stick to a diet that is generally low on the GI scale. Including Fibre and Fats in your meals will lower the GI even further.

restless
10-23-2002, 03:01 AM
Peanut butter is mainly omega 6, i'f memory doesn't fail me (and it does quite a few times these days...). Not the wisest of choices when our diets are already too high on these. Cod liver oil, walnuts and salmon oil are your best bets. Try to get oils that went trough a reliable purification process so you avoid ingesting more mercury than you have to.

WestyHeadbanger
10-23-2002, 03:05 AM
Yes tuna is high in EFA's.

Eating cookies 1-2 an hour, instead of binging is smart and stuff.

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-23-2002, 05:34 AM
Originally posted by WestyHeadbanger
Yes tuna is high in EFA's.



The tinned in brine stuff ain't.

And listen to Yates for Q1.

GonePostal
10-23-2002, 08:30 AM
So is canned tuna high in efa's or not? If not why is it different from normal tuna...

Yates: Logically the spikes in insulin will not be as high and will be evened out more because you intaking the high GI food over a long period of time. Insulin only spikes because of excess glucose in the blood. So if you eat a small amount of High GI food most should be used immediately by the body right?

bradley
10-23-2002, 08:41 AM
Originally posted by GonePostal
So is canned tuna high in efa's or not? If not why is it different from normal tuna...

Yates: Logically the spikes in insulin will not be as high and will be evened out more because you intaking the high GI food over a long period of time. Insulin only spikes because of excess glucose in the blood. So if you eat a small amount of High GI food most should be used immediately by the body right?

High glycemic index carbs digest faster than low GI index carbs so therefore there will be a faster rise in blood glucose as compared to low GI carbs.

Canned or not I don't believe that tuna is high in EFA's. The only difference in canned and say tuna steaks would be the added sodium and maybe preservatives. If you are looking for a gish that is a good source of EFA's stick to salmon (canned or filets).

GonePostal
10-23-2002, 08:45 AM
Bradley was i talking to you???!!!
hehe j/k
thanks for the info... now trying to find out what is the right answer =)

YatesNightBlade
10-23-2002, 09:14 AM
I see what your saying dude, but why would you do this ??? you want sustained release of energy for something other then high GI. Not a raise then a drop then a raise then a drop. Insulin is still gonna be relased quicker to deal.

The_Chicken_Daddy
10-23-2002, 09:36 AM
Originally posted by GonePostal
So is canned tuna high in efa's or not? If not why is it different from normal tuna...

Yates: Logically the spikes in insulin will not be as high and will be evened out more because you intaking the high GI food over a long period of time. Insulin only spikes because of excess glucose in the blood. So if you eat a small amount of High GI food most should be used immediately by the body right?

It seems like you're just looking for an excuse here man. If you want the cookies, eat the damn cookies.

Fact of the matter, is that a cookies or one cookie will digest rapidly (compared to say, oats), blood sugar will rise quicker, insulin will be released quicker, so blood sugar will drop quicker. These swings in blood sugar is what causes cravings and hunger pangs.

A swift drop in blood sugar and the body thinks it needs food so sends hunger signals to the brain to let you know it's time to eat. Which is why during cheat days, no matter how stuffed your stomach is, you're still hungry.

Yanick
10-23-2002, 10:10 AM
:withstupi

How do you have access to cookies but not oatmeal?

AJ_11
10-23-2002, 02:15 PM
Herring and sardines are an excellent source of efa's -- the ones that I buy

Protein - 20g

Fat 8.0 - {Poly 2.0(omega 3 - 1.2, omega 6 - 0.2), Mono - 4.0,
Sat 1.8}

I also heard that herring contains the most amt of creatine. Not 100% on this one. I know that beef has some in it as well. I try to eat a can once a day. MMMM fish.

GonePostal
10-23-2002, 04:20 PM
I understand how I might sound but....
1. I eat 1 1/2 -2 cups of oatmeal every morning
2. 2 I don't eat cookies. (friends can attest to that unless I am in a dire situation)
3. This was more of a theoretical question. Mirrors an integral. High GI foods do spike your insulin but as you partition the food into smaller peices and spread them out over time. That effect is minimized as you partition the food into smaller quantities and you get closer to a constant blood glucose level. Was wondering if there is any other biological mechanism that you know of would make this theory invalid. As it stands I see that high GI foods can be eatting with little or no harm if you partition them into small enough amounts. Also if partitioned small enough all the glucose that the high GI food produces will be used by the body and thus not causing any insulin spike.