PDA

View Full Version : Eating habits and weight loss.



izitnick
10-24-2002, 05:16 PM
Before i ask my question i'll give you a little background on me, physically. I'm 18 years old 5'11" and around 280 lbs. I'm fat, yes- but in high school I participated in football and wrestling, so I still have a lot of that muscle tone and strength and some of the conditioning left over. I gained about thirty pounds over the summer, arriving me at 280. Last week I made a committment to better myself and so far i've stuck to my plan. During the course of the day I eat 3 pieces of fruit and one medium lunch-sized meal. I also walk 4 miles every day (except sundays, when i play backyard football for a few hours). The walking 4 miles will change over to running a certain increasing distances once i progress more. I know that was long winded, but here is my question- I've read that starvation dieting can damage your metabolism, causing a bounce-back effect once you stop dieting as much. What I'm not sure of is that, is what I'm doing considered starvation dieting?
This weekend I'm going to GNC to pick up an e/c stack product such as GNC's Optibolic® Metabolic Complete™.

_-_v_-_
10-24-2002, 07:39 PM
Yes. That would be starvation, or near enough to it.

Assuming you don't want to go the ketogenic or similarly low-carb route, then aim for five to six small meals per day, each comprising balanced portions of carbohydrate, protein, and fat.
Diet advice can be found on this site.

Also, incorporate resistance training into your fitness regimen. Might I recommend the WBB routines.

izitnick
10-24-2002, 09:02 PM
I see what you're saying, and i read the diet advice on the this site. It was detailed enough to make me understand what I'm doing wrong but open ended. I have a few questions about a possible 'menu' for a day, just to make sure I understand what foods would be good for me to start on a '5 small meals a day' plan. How about something like this:

Breakfast:
Bowl of oatmeal
a piece of toast with peanut butter
an apple

breakfast/lunch:
Small-sized can of chicken and rice soup
some saltine crackers

lunch:
Small bowl of spaghetti with a bit of lean ground beef in the sauce
piece of fruit (apple, pear, banana, peach)

lunch/dinner:
baked potato with salsa on top (I'm wierd like that)

dinner:
Moderate sized chicken breast or burger cooked on a Foreman grill, on a whole wheat bun
Some carrot sticks or other raw vegetable

Does that look good? I'm confident I can think of suitable workout plan using what I already know (due to my experience in high school athletics, I worked out/practiced either every day or every other day for 4 years).

Thanks for you help, everyone. I appreciate your input and any advice you can give me.

izitnick
10-24-2002, 09:02 PM
I see what you're saying, and i read the diet advice on the this site. It was detailed enough to make me understand what I'm doing wrong but open ended. I have a few questions about a possible 'menu' for a day, just to make sure I understand what foods would be good for me to start on a '5 small meals a day' plan. How about something like this:

Breakfast:
Bowl of oatmeal
a piece of toast with peanut butter
an apple

breakfast/lunch:
Small-sized can of chicken and rice soup
some saltine crackers

lunch:
Small bowl of spaghetti with a bit of lean ground beef in the sauce
piece of fruit (apple, pear, banana, peach)

lunch/dinner:
baked potato with salsa on top (I'm wierd like that)

dinner:
Moderate sized chicken breast or burger cooked on a Foreman grill, on a whole wheat bun
Some carrot sticks or other raw vegetable

Does that look good? I'm confident I can think of suitable workout plan using what I already know (due to my experience in high school athletics, I worked out/practiced either every day or every other day for 4 years).

Thanks for you help, everyone. I appreciate your input and any advice you can give me.

_-_v_-_
10-24-2002, 09:18 PM
That's a good start. What I would suggest, however, is the following:

Decide upon a macronutrient split. Say, 40%c/40%p, 20% f, if you prefer more carbs, or say 50 p / 30 f / 20 c. I'm of the opinion that such details are largely irrelevant; what matters is calories in versus calories out. That said, now focus on clean, whole foods. This means:

1) Focus on whole-grain, low-GI carbohydrates. Avoid white flour, white bread, white pasta, sugar, candy, soda, etc... Eat oatmeal, TRUE whole wheat bread (read the ingredients to see if it is real whole wheat), whole wheat pasta, sweet potatoes, brown rice, fruit (in moderation), fibrous veggies, etc...

2) Eat at least 1 g / (lb of lean body mass) of protein per day. Focus on complete protein.

3) Eat healthful fats in moderation. Natural peanut butter, eggs, almonds, walnuts, peanuts, olive oil, flax oil, fatty fish, etc...

See how these rules help. And don't be so quick to ignore the wealth of training resources on this site. We have some frighteningly well-read and well-educated people here, many of whom I would trust over any athletic coach.

izitnick
10-24-2002, 09:28 PM
Thanks for the advice. I'd appreciate it if you could clarify one point, though- you mentioned sweet potatoes as something that'd be good to eat, but not regular potatoes. Why, might I ask?

AJ_11
10-24-2002, 09:46 PM
Originally posted by _-_v_-_
That's a good start. What I would suggest, however, is the following:

Decide upon a macronutrient split. Say, 40%c/40%p, 20% f, if you prefer more carbs, or say 50 p / 30 f / 20 c. I'm of the opinion that such details are largely irrelevant; what matters is calories in versus calories out. That said, now focus on clean, whole foods. This means:

1) Focus on whole-grain, low-GI carbohydrates. Avoid white flour, white bread, white pasta, sugar, candy, soda, etc... Eat oatmeal, TRUE whole wheat bread (read the ingredients to see if it is real whole wheat), whole wheat pasta, sweet potatoes, brown rice, fruit (in moderation), fibrous veggies, etc...

2) Eat at least 1 g / (lb of lean body mass) of protein per day. Focus on complete protein.

3) Eat healthful fats in moderation. Natural peanut butter, eggs, almonds, walnuts, peanuts, olive oil, flax oil, fatty fish, etc...

See how these rules help. And don't be so quick to ignore the wealth of training resources on this site. We have some frighteningly well-read and well-educated people here, many of whom I would trust over any athletic coach.

:withstupi

That sounds preety accurate, another thing to remember is if you want to lose weight; multiply your Weight by 12 and that how many calories will want to consume. Also definitley do some cardio with a weight training. I would split these up on seperate days but its up to you. Also shoot for losing 1-2llbs a week and that way you are doing things right and less likely to gain it back.
As far as supplements use whey powder to get in extra protein. I wouldn't start using a EC stack just yet. Wait untill you reach a point where weight loss slows down. Then take it. You are most likely to see results once you start training. One thing that I can't stress enough is water intake. Drink it, Plenty of it.

Other than that there is TONS of info on this site. If you have any questions just ask.

_-_v_-_
10-25-2002, 01:15 AM
Sweet potatoes are much lower glycemic than regular potatoes, are higher in beta-carotene and fiber, and, well, taste a hell of a lot better :)

ectx
10-25-2002, 01:49 AM
What the literary one said. I was in your boat too, a little heavier, even. Don't lose faith in yourself and keep it simple...have a protein serving with each meal...ie. a chicken breast, 8 oz of fish or lean beef, 1 can of tuna, 1 cup of oatmeal. Have one serving of a low gi carb...those that V listed are great, but also have a higher gi carb with 1 or 2 of your other meals...ie, 1/2 a grapefruit, 7 strawberries, 1 cup of pretty much any green veggie. I'd also supplement 2-3 of your meals with EFA's like flax or fish oil caps. Anyhow, good luck and don't lose faith in yourself.

Stray
10-25-2002, 08:47 AM
Stay motivated above all else..it takes alot of time and hard work but the end result is worth it.



"I do now what others won't so I can have later what others can't"

Jane
10-26-2002, 09:49 AM
The plan you posted is a good start, but work on getting more protein into your day. Try to base your meals around protein, for example: breakfast--egg whites, egg, and salsa. lunch--chicken sandwich. etc, etc.

Weight training is much more useful for fat loss than cardio. Focus on three-four weight training sessions a week, and get your cardio in where you can around that.

You can do it. :)

Reinier
10-26-2002, 09:57 AM
:nod: :withstupi

izitnick
10-26-2002, 05:55 PM
Thanks Jane. I'll work more protein into my meals. Today I got all the food i needed for the week along with a new personal-sized Foreman grill :)
About weight training being more useful that cardio for fat loss, I think what I'll do is go back to my old high school (they've asked me to help out their wrestling program). I'll probably do something like legs/abs one day, upper body/back the next, take a day off, legs/abs, upperbody/back. I know that's not the most scientific routine but I think it will work for me. Also, I'm sure the exercise I get working with the younger guys on the mat will definitely give me some cardio work (I know it did when I was one of those 'younger guys!)

thanks again for all your input, everyone.

izitnick
10-26-2002, 06:06 PM
Oh, here's something i should have mentioned before, but I hadn't until now. I've recieved input from a few knowledgable people... I'm being hired at UPS a few weeks christmas to help with the package rush that occurs around that time. Working at a place that involves loading 1 to 70 lb boxes onto trucks almost constantly for 5 hours at a time, what would that do to one's need to go to the gym to weight train or do supplemental cardio work?

TurboStu
10-26-2002, 09:32 PM
I am about the same as you (two months from my 18th birthday) and I am 6'1. I weight 288 to be exact. I have already lost about 20 lbs. For me what I needed to do was 1-start doing some from of exzercise besides lifting. 2-eat a well balanced diet. My diet isn't reallt a split of any kind, it just gives me a well balanced diet that isn't soaring ever higher in calories. Make sure you eat well balanced meals, never starve yourself, and try to avoid cheat days wehre you go all out and eat everything in site. If you can steer clear of those, you will do fine, with minimal chances of bouncing back up to 280. Good Luck to ya!

AJ_11
10-27-2002, 11:41 AM
Originally posted by izitnick
Thanks Jane. I'll work more protein into my meals. Today I got all the food i needed for the week along with a new personal-sized Foreman grill :)
About weight training being more useful that cardio for fat loss, I think what I'll do is go back to my old high school (they've asked me to help out their wrestling program). I'll probably do something like legs/abs one day, upper body/back the next, take a day off, legs/abs, upperbody/back. I know that's not the most scientific routine but I think it will work for me. Also, I'm sure the exercise I get working with the younger guys on the mat will definitely give me some cardio work (I know it did when I was one of those 'younger guys!)

thanks again for all your input, everyone.

You don't want to overtrain. Don't overdo it. Work on one bodypart a week. Your muscles need time to recovery to grow. Try this chest/back, legs/abs, rest, shoulders, arms, rest, rest, repeat. If you can throw a 20 min intense cardio seesion in on 2 rest days and along with a balanced diet you will meet your goals.

Help this helps a little.