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PowerManDL
12-09-2002, 11:06 AM
http://groups.google.com/groups?q=interval+group:misc.fitness.weights&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&scoring=d&selm=6cbf4ab2.0211190854.579443a5%
40posting.google.com&rnum=6

Found this link on Supertraining-- it points to an MFW discussion regarding interval training specifically for fat loss.

I've been saying for awhile now that shorter, harder intervals are better for fat-burning than using 20 or 30 second bursts, and this seems to lend to that argument, but with a bit of a twist.

The study notes that, given equal treadmill speed and work duration, fat oxidation was 3 times lower in the group that used 24 second work intervals and 36 second rest intervals, compared to a group using 6s/9s ratios.

"The decline in muscle oxygenation during work was correlated
with mean lactate concentration (r = 0.68; n = 12). Lower
levels of fat oxidation occurred concurrent with accelerated
carbohydrate metabolism, increases in lactate and pyruvate and reduced
muscle O(2) availability. These changes were associated with
proportionately longer work and recovery periods, despite identical
treadmill speed and total work duration. The proposal that a metabolic
regulatory factor within the muscle fibre retards fat oxidation under
these conditions is supported by the current findings."

The discussion goes on to mention myoglobin, the oxygen-binding protein in muscle. Myoglobin provides short bursts of oxygen in anaerobic conditions. That seems to be the key here; lactate blocks fat oxidation, leaving myoglobin to fuel the oxidative process. Once it gets used up, fat utilization is shut off in favor of glycogen metabolism.

Now, I'm not exactly sure what protocol was used in the study mentioned; I also don't know what "optimal" work:rest ratio exists. However, it is compelling information to keep intervals short and hard, using ample rest periods.

hemants
12-09-2002, 11:46 AM
Linky no worky.

PowerManDL
12-09-2002, 11:57 AM
Should work now :)

Tryska
12-09-2002, 12:13 PM
WRONG!

please try again.

PowerManDL
12-09-2002, 12:19 PM
Cut and paste then you lazy heathens!

DaCypher
12-09-2002, 01:38 PM
http://groups.google.com/groups?q=interval+group:misc.fitness.weights&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&scoring=d&selm=6cbf4ab2.0211190854.579443a5%40posting.google.com&rnum=6 should work.

I'm not totally sure what this article says though. A 6s work and 9s rest period is the most optimal for fast loss? That seems like a pain in the ass to do on a treadmill, you would be constantly changing the speed.

PowerManDL
12-09-2002, 04:38 PM
No, its not saying that its optimal.....just that a shorter work interval seems to be better than a longer one....ie, a 15 second would be better than a 30 second, given the same speed, energy expenditure, etc.

Now a good point was raised in that thread, in that it isn't necessarily the fat burned during the session that causes HIIT's benefits. HOwever, the more I think about it, the more likely it seems that you'd want to exploit it, because it would be a more "specific" adaptation to fat utilization....the adaptation to burning massive amounts of fat IS what interval training is all about.

Vido
12-09-2002, 04:45 PM
Sounds good to me. The shorter the sprints have to be, the better :D.

DaCypher, I think that would be impossible to do on a treadmill. It takes at least 10 seconds for the machine to go from resting speed to sprinting speed. There is no reason that you have to do sprints inside though. Find a running track or a long, straight, quiet road and do the sprints there.

Tiare
12-09-2002, 06:24 PM
I'd like to see someone confirm the results before I bank a whole lot of time on trying to do 6 second sprints on a treadmill.

-As Vido points out, how do they get to sprint speed? On the other hand, how do they get to resting speeds?

-Another point to consider is that it was a study of 7 subjects. If just 1 subject was in extremely good condition and 1 in very poor condition, the numbers could be seriously distorted.

-I did not see in the article how they measured fat oxidations, only how they measured oxygenation.

That being said, I love HIIT training.

PowerManDL
12-09-2002, 06:46 PM
The point isn't that the protocol used in the study is optimal, guys.....its that a shorter working period seems to be better than a longer one, for the purposes of fat oxidation.

I'd not even attempt that on a treadmill, or on any piece of equipment. This would best be done outdoors.

DaCypher
12-09-2002, 08:15 PM
Hmm, my problem is that I can't really sprint (at least with any significant intensity) outdoors because I have a bad knee. I can only get away with sprinting hard on some of the newer treadmills at my gym (they seem to have better cushioning support). Maybe I'll have to stick with what HIIT I can do on a treadmill. :(

xraygirl
12-09-2002, 10:19 PM
I bet that this would work on a StairMaster.

hemants
12-10-2002, 08:47 AM
Damn, no wonder I was leanest when I was playing squash.

Tryska
12-10-2002, 08:56 AM
i think i might have to try this on the stairs outside my gym.

jds22
12-10-2002, 10:05 AM
It seems that the general rule is cardio in the morning on an empty stomach. Would this method of HIIT be just as effective regardless of when it was done?

That would be great if it did because it is now too cold at 5:30am to go outside and sprint. If I could do this, with the same effectiveness when I get home from work, that would be great.

If I can't go outside to sprint, don't laugh, could I just run in place?

Thanks,
Jerry

PowerManDL
12-10-2002, 10:15 AM
Everything I've seen suggests that HIIT is far, far superior than AM cardio before food.

jds22
12-11-2002, 08:08 AM
I don't think the reasoning behind HIIT is cardiovascular conditioning, but more specifically fat loss. I may be wrong. As for me, right now I am more interested in fat loss than cardiovasular fitness. Although I am sure that by doing HIIT you will increase your cardio fitness to some degree.

Jerry

PowerManDL
12-11-2002, 10:59 AM
HIIT is the quickest way to increase V02 max as well as anaerobic work capacity. It'll help out your weight training or any strenous, short-term activity.

As for being skinny.....it'll only make you skinny if you're already skinny. I've done hard HIIT training in the past without losing a single pound of muscle (granted I was skinny then but the point remains that it is muscle-sparing).

DaCypher
12-11-2002, 10:41 PM
How long do these sprint/run intervals go for?

zelsey
12-13-2002, 05:40 PM
could you not do 6s/9s intervals on a treadmill by sprinting the 6s and then hopping onto the rails on the side of the treadmill? You would just leave the machine at the sprint speed and not have to constantly adjust it. This is how I do my interval training and it seems to work well. I understand it is best to remain moving throughout the training, but the difference between sprints and absolute rest would shock the heck out of your CP system, which would be a good thing.

Fudomyo
12-14-2002, 09:52 AM
I believe that Dr. Tabata's 1E1 protocol has been shown to have the biggest effect on anerobic AND aerobic capacity.

10 minute warmup
6-8 sets of 20 second sprints, followed by 10 seconds of rest
Cool down

It was as much as 50% more effective than 2 minute sprints, which is what I used to do.

Fudo

NateDogg
12-14-2002, 03:25 PM
Originally posted by zelsey
could you not do 6s/9s intervals on a treadmill by sprinting the 6s and then hopping onto the rails on the side of the treadmill? You would just leave the machine at the sprint speed and not have to constantly adjust it. This is how I do my interval training and it seems to work well. I understand it is best to remain moving throughout the training, but the difference between sprints and absolute rest would shock the heck out of your CP system, which would be a good thing.

Althougth possible, I cannot imagine anyone advocating it to someone they are liable for. Chances of breaking one's face I would imagine, would increase exponentially with hopping on and off a treadmill moving at sprint speed!

Behemoth
12-14-2002, 05:01 PM
lmao at nd, if you do attemp zelsey make sure to invite me to your gym to watch you

EMan
12-15-2002, 08:08 PM
what about combining HIIT in short intervals with morning cardio before food?

You could take some glutamine to prevent muscle catabolizatoin (sp?), then when you wake up do the HIIT before eating.
Would this be effective or would it be overkill ?

PowerManDL
12-15-2002, 08:15 PM
HIIT is glycogen fueled......meaning it wouldn't be very fun on an empty stomach.

EMan
12-15-2002, 08:22 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
HIIT is glycogen fueled......meaning it wouldn't be very fun on an empty stomach.

I see... so then when would be the best time to do it? a couple hours after breakfast ?

What about total length of the run? I understand that 6sec + 9sec rest is ideal for fat loss, but as far as the overall time for HIIT ? 10 min ? 20 min ?

PowerManDL
12-15-2002, 09:35 PM
I was doing good on 20 minutes or so......and I wasn't even trying to keep up with 6/9.....I used more like 15/45.

At any rate, the 20 minutes included warmup and cooldown times.

As far as when to do it....you'd want to do HIIT in the same state you'd want to lift weights.

AJ_11
12-16-2002, 10:46 PM
I think that I am going to try it out but I am going to use a Cross trainer. You could probably do a good job on a stationary bike as well. Do you think that it would be as affective doing on these machines or is it wiser doing on a treadmill/track.

Shao-LiN
12-16-2002, 11:20 PM
I currently use a pre-workout shake containing 20 grams whey protein and 20 grams dextrose and a post-workout shake containing 40 grams whey and 20 grams dextrose. Would that be advisable to take?

As far as timing, was thinking of 15 minutes prior to cardio for the pre-cardio shake and 1 hour afterwards for the post-cardio shake. Or would you shift the post- shake to right after the run?

Cue-Ball
12-19-2002, 05:06 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
HIIT is glycogen fueled......meaning it wouldn't be very fun on an empty stomach.

I agree with this statement, but i think it would still be advisable to perform HIIT in the early morning. Not necessarily on an empty stomach, but the earlier the better.

Since the main benefit of HIIT is increased metabolism post-workout, it would seem that performing it earlier would be better. Also, since the body lowers its metabolism during sleep, doing HIIT a few hours before bedtime would not seem to be as beneficial. So, the earlier you workout the more benefit you would receive throughout the day.

Would you agree with this, PowerMan?

PowerManDL
12-19-2002, 06:31 PM
I'm not so sure that its the overall metabolic rate that has the effect, but rather that HIIT adapts your body to oxidize fat more efficiently.

Really, since it comes down to cals in vs. cals out anyway, when you do it won't matter. The beauty of HIIT isn't so much that it burns more cals, but that it causes an overall increase in usage of fat, which has been supported by research.

Common
12-28-2002, 01:06 PM
What is HIIT?

Shao-LiN
12-28-2002, 01:40 PM
If you're referring to what it stands for, High Intensity Interval Training.

If you're asking what it actually is, you really need to go to the beginning of the thread and read very slowly.

goobermor
12-29-2002, 09:14 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
I was doing good on 20 minutes or so......and I wasn't even trying to keep up with 6/9.....I used more like 15/45.

At any rate, the 20 minutes included warmup and cooldown times.


so powermandl, id suspect that you did around 10 'sprints' for that HIIT session?

PowerManDL
12-29-2002, 09:31 PM
More or less.....though I'd occasionally throw in 3-4 minutes of low-intensity if the work got to be too much.

ThreeD
12-30-2002, 03:03 AM
I've read a lot about it, but I don't feel ready to get started with the high intensive workout yet. Soon though :)

DaCypher
12-31-2002, 06:50 PM
What I don't completely understand is how it is working... That is, does this 6/9 method use more calories than a, say, 15/45 split? If the energy expenditure difference is not very significant, then how does the 6/9 method actual burn more fat since it does come down to cals in vs cals out? Assuming both methods use a similar amount of calories then why would you lose so much more fat with the 6/9 method than the 15/45? Maybe I am totally misinterpreting something here, please explain. :)

Manveet
01-01-2003, 12:09 AM
Da Cypher you are misinterpreting. I've cut and pasted stuff from the article that will hopefully clear things up


Myoglobin is a large protein that binds to oxygen inside your muscle
cells [3]. Think of it a little like a "reserve" oxygen supply.


According to Astrand, myoglobin is repeatedly used and reloaded during
the work and recovery phases of interval exercise.


However, as the duration of the work period's increase, myoglobin
stores are reduced.
Your body needs more oxygen to use fat as a fuel (compared to
carbohydrate or protein). When oxygen supplies become limited,
carbohydrate supplies a greater proportion of energy.
Because lactic acid, a by-product of carbohydrate metabolism, "blocks"
fat burning, intervals that continue beyond the point at which
myoglobin loses its supply of oxygen rely to a greater extent



My question is, can I do this on a stationary bike? Or does it have to be done on a treadmill/track?

goobermor
01-01-2003, 06:33 PM
I really wouldnt want to attempt HIIT on a treadmill just cause your supposed to go all out for a short period of time...and near the end your goin to get tired and start stumbling once in a while. No idea how your going to get the treadmill up to speed fast enough, and then slow it down while your in a full sprint.

You could prolly do it on a bike, but you'd have to pedal pretty damn fast to expend the same energy as you would running. I'd assume this would be true for most people....cause you'd really have to pedal like a madman.

Honestly the best way (some may say only way) to do it is on a track, or at a park. Thou bring a friend along to drive you home cause your not goin to feel too good afterwards :D

DaCypher
01-01-2003, 07:10 PM
Manveet,
I think I understand that part, that this type of training forces your body to use fat for energy as opposed to the other macronutrients. However, my question is, why does this actually matter since fat loss comes down to cals in vs cals out? What if you don't even do any cardio but you are at a caloric deficit, aren't you still going to lose fat? Or what if you are at a caloric surplus and do this 6/9 HIIT style cardio, wouldn't you then still gain fat?

Manveet
01-01-2003, 07:13 PM
I dunno man?

*waits for powerman to answer

PowerManDL
01-01-2003, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by DaCypher
Manveet,
I think I understand that part, that this type of training forces your body to use fat for energy as opposed to the other macronutrients. However, my question is, why does this actually matter since fat loss comes down to cals in vs cals out? What if you don't even do any cardio but you are at a caloric deficit, aren't you still going to lose fat? Or what if you are at a caloric surplus and do this 6/9 HIIT style cardio, wouldn't you then still gain fat?

That's where it gets tricky. You've got to distinguish between fat loss and *weight* loss.

Weight loss is cals in vs. cals out, yes. But this is where I'm going with HIIT....it burns fat preferentially. No I'm not saying that a person can bulk with 5000 kcals and minimize fat gain using it. But you could very easily keep cals a lot closer to maintenance, and yes possibly even slightly above while still causing a change in body composition.

I should add that you'd really stay about the same weight, probably drop some pounds, but notice that you just *looked* better.

The benefits here are that you're not wasting away your muscle tissue, since the cals that are being used, given a decent diet, are going to be fat. A variant of a CKD would be highly useful, with the majority of carbs going to fuel the HIIT sessions and weight training.

It'd be my choice for leaning up for anything but contest preparedness-- to get THAT ripped, diet does have to come into play.

FrusWeighted
01-03-2003, 09:28 AM
Are you sure I couldn't do HIIT and weight training on the same days? Where I'm at right now, I'm only up to about 6 minutes on HIIT and it seems like so little... couldn't I work out with weights later on the same day? Should I even bother building time up on HIIT? Or should I just do a full twenty minutes each time? Right now, every other workout I do I add a minute to the total time spent. I just started HIIT a week or two ago, so that's why I only do 6 minutes right now, but I do feel the difference, even after such a short workout. What's the proper way to ration out this workout?

Tryska
01-03-2003, 09:38 AM
so here's a question. I did a HIT session today for 15 minutes.

because it was on a treadmill my intervals were 1 - 1.5 minutes on 2 - 2.5 minutes off. I used heart rate to judge when i was ready for another interval.

Max heart rate was about 185 i considered myself recovered when my HR reached 145.

obviously this is not the most effective way of doing HIIT, but was it effective enough?

Slowmo
01-03-2003, 10:09 AM
I'd suggest doing 60 sec on, 60 sec off. In the beginning it will be hard so maybe start with something like 30/60 and build up. When you can do 60/60 for 10 intervals just keep adding resistance or speed (depending on the apparatus used) for the sprint part. You will get ripped.

Also, they are extremely efficient when done on an empty stomach (throw in EC or something similar for a boost). If you are prone to lose muscle then this won't work for you. Otherwise do it.

Tryska
01-03-2003, 10:25 AM
60 at this point is a little too small an amount of time for me to recover from the intensity of the interval i'm doing. (like i said, heartrate winds up in the 180s and i feel like my chest is gonna explode).

I can compromise the intensity, but i don't see where that would benefit. also because i'm using a treadmill at the moment, 30/60 would be difficult to manage without spendign most of my time pressing buttons. wish i had a treadmill available that let me program my own intervals, but those actually tend to transition slower anyways.

AJ_11
01-03-2003, 10:41 AM
Do you guys have access to cross trainers at your gyms because I tell you it works really well with HIIT.

I find that doing the 6/9 interval with ease because of the control that I have. I usually burn about 415 cals in 20 mins which usually took me 40min on the treadmill.

How long should I wait to eat after and what should the meal be. Should I generally follow the same window of oppertunity that I use for weights for HIIT training as well? Or should I wait to eat? Also what should the meal be?

Tryska
01-03-2003, 10:49 AM
cross trainer? you mean an elliptical?

and by 6/9 we mean 6 second/9 second recovery right?

AJ_11
01-03-2003, 11:03 AM
Originally posted by Tryska
cross trainer? you mean an elliptical?

and by 6/9 we mean 6 second/9 second recovery right?

yes and yes.

Tryska
01-03-2003, 11:05 AM
hmmm.....i can see using the elliptical like that. i suppose i could use the back pedal as my rest, and the forward pedal as the work interval.

i may ahve to try that next session.

PowerManDL
01-03-2003, 02:15 PM
60 seconds is waaaaaay too long, mostly because you can't keep up the needed level of exertion for that long.

30 seconds is too long for most people, and honestly, doing 15 seconds with 45 second rests is enough to put me down after 4-5 minutes.

/me isn't in shape right now.

goobermor
01-03-2003, 08:37 PM
Seems like HIIT is more about the sprints than anything else...for those having trouble doing around the full 10 sprints, why not just walk till your ready to sprint again?

Has anyone found some information which showed that the low intensity 'jogging' period actually performed a use? I could have the whole concept of HIIT wrong, but from the links posted here it seems like the real bread and butter is the sprints, which would mean those having trouble doing 10+ mins of HIIT could just walk around for a bit till their ready:)

PowerManDL
01-03-2003, 09:36 PM
The sprints light the fire. The low-intensity lets it burn.

To coin a very crude analogy, anyway.

In actuality, the low-intensity periods just allow you to recover for the next sprint (as well as burning a good deal of fat due to getting rid of all that lactate and otherwise replenishing energy levels).

Slowmo
01-04-2003, 10:05 AM
PowermanDL: 60 secs isn't too long if you build up to it. The guys over at anabolicfitness.com (hands down the most scientific and educated board btw) were talking about this kind of training back in 2001, before anyone else did, and as I recall no one used very short intervals like 6 seconds. I myself have used 60sec on/60sec off (after building up) and it works extremely well. When done on an empty stomach you might need some "supplements" to combat catabolism.

BTW, this is the guy who first started talking about this kind of training at AF (you had a thread about him here :)

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5592&highlight=fukkenshredded

I can tell you he seems very intelligent and also knowledgeable on the scientific aspect of training.

Tryska
01-04-2003, 11:43 AM
don't get it twisted tho slowmo - we were talkign about and doing intervals back then too, we just didn't have the research to back it up.


i myself started with 30 seconds and built up to 1:30 high intensity intervals at higher speeds over the past two years. problem is i haven't been doign it consistently so i can't prove it's been doing the trick. it's definitely made a difference in my overall fitness tho.

PowerManDL
01-04-2003, 12:42 PM
Originally posted by Slowmo
PowermanDL: 60 secs isn't too long if you build up to it. The guys over at anabolicfitness.com (hands down the most scientific and educated board btw) were talking about this kind of training back in 2001, before anyone else did, and as I recall no one used very short intervals like 6 seconds. I myself have used 60sec on/60sec off (after building up) and it works extremely well. When done on an empty stomach you might need some "supplements" to combat catabolism.

1) If you're building up to it, its NOT a sprint.
2) Sprints are fueled by glycogen. Doing them on an empty stomach is a Bad Thing (TM).
3) I've been talking about and researching HIIT just as long.
4) This isn't going to become a debate about who's the most scientific and educated. I promise you its not.

BTW, this is the guy who first started talking about this kind of training at AF (you had a thread about him here :)

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5592&highlight=fukkenshredded

I can tell you he seems very intelligent and also knowledgeable on the scientific aspect of training.

Again, I'm not turning this into a "this guy said" debate. If you can back up what your saying with research, be my guest.

Slowmo
01-04-2003, 02:06 PM
Believe me, I'm all for science and studies but there are times when practice proves things that have no or very little studies or theory to back them up.

Yes, it has been proven that high intensity cardio is superior to lower intensity. No dispute there. I just don't think it's feasible to do 6sec/9sec for intervals. We have one study claiming that this is optimal for fat loss yet I don't know anybody who does this. Interval training or actually lipolysis caused by it hasn't been thoroughly researched so it's hard to draw conclusions and determine the optimal work/relief ratio with the few studies we have.

There are people who have had HUGE success with longer intervals. Be it 30/60 or, if somebody has been doing them for long enough to reach the necessary fitness level and ability to withstand lactic acid buildup, 60/60. I do know that a 60 second interval isn't a sprint anymore. It's still high intensity and you get lactic acid buildup preventing you from continuing so I belive it is anaerobic

As for the empty stomach thing, all I can say is it works. There is very little glycogen in the muscles and the liver so logically it's either muscle or fat. Even without any kind of thermogenic or stimulant, you would still get a big noradrenaline rush providing you with energy. Some people are prone to lose muscle easily so this probably wouldn't work for them. However, I have read about a lot of people who had success doing it like this.

AJ_11
01-04-2003, 03:17 PM
As far as morning cardio goes it would leave you roo long before you eat. If you think about it, you sleep for 8 hours, then go to the gym if you do 20min and wait for another hour after exercise to shed some more fat then that is about 9-10hrs without eating on top of doing an intense aerobic session.

I admit I have done morning cardio and seen results (usually I ended losing weight), but now since incorporating the HIIT (which I started doing about 3 weeks ago) I have notice a slight change then morning cardio, more so in body composition change. I have noticed my weight staying the same and body fat levels and dropping. I have changed a few things in my diet but overall it stayed the same.

chromium6
01-19-2003, 01:48 AM
Now. This HIIT Training seems Ideal for me. Seeing as how I am in the phat burning phase. But Do you think it would be a good idea. too use HIIT training. While on XENADRINE RFA-1??? Seeing as how it could speed up my hart rate. pretty damn fast.

AJ_11
01-19-2003, 03:14 AM
Depends on what your your rate is at. For me I use an ECA and my heart rate just reaches above 150.

chromium6
01-19-2003, 01:12 PM
Now I am not too good with monitoring. My heart Rate. What would be a good way too Rate it??? And What Rates are unsafe?

AJ_11
01-19-2003, 02:19 PM
i think that you subtract your age from 220 and 80% of that is considered an intense workout. 60 is moderate

Tiare
01-20-2003, 09:59 AM
I've been trying to do HIIT at my clubhouse but the dang treadmills die out if you turn them up to a 10mph or greater speed. Sucks to be trying your routine and the machine keeps dying.

Oh, and wind sprints have been around since the 60's so saying some 30 year old guy started HIIT he would have had to start it as an egg in his mothers ovaries. That's like saying Atkins started the high fat low carb diet.

Erbas
01-22-2003, 10:15 AM
Hmmmmm....

Based on my understanding of the article posted, it would seem that the sprint interval of 6-15 s is for fat energy use due to oxygen availability provided by the myoglobin.

The active recovery interval allows myoglobin oxygen store replentishment and, perhaps, gets rid of some of the lactic acid build up which could block myoglobin oxygen uptake.

Given this, why can't you optimize fatloss by doing moring HIIT on an empty stomach? When does the body "need" glycogen?

I guess what I'm getting at...if you are theoretically oxidizing fat during the first 6-15s of the sprint....could you not continue to burn fat while in the recovery interval if no carb based energy supply is not immediately available?

Throwing this out there for comments and critique

PowerManDL
01-22-2003, 10:52 AM
The recovery interval will burn fat regardless; oxidation is going to occur after an anaerobic interval.

The idea between the shorter interval is that, once you get beyond that fuzzy threshold time on the intensive portion, fat metabolism stops completely and becomes completely anaerobic, whereas before it was still burning fat.

I don't want people to think it was creating a specific time interval that you had to shoot for; just that in general, shorter is better for the intensive part.

And for the record.....the whole idea behind this is so you don't HAVE to do it in the morning and on an empty stomach-- yet still get equal or better results.

Erbas
01-22-2003, 12:04 PM
Thanks Powerman....I ceratinly can appreciate the theory and I think I'm going to give it a try. Perhaps 10s sprint and 15s recovery...as a goal...probably have to start with 30s recovery with my outta shape ass....

NotSoBig
01-26-2003, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by zelsey
could you not do 6s/9s intervals on a treadmill by sprinting the 6s and then hopping onto the rails on the side of the treadmill? You would just leave the machine at the sprint speed and not have to constantly adjust it.

If I tried that **** on my treadmill, someone would be picking me up off the floor. Do you just jump in the air and try to get your legs moving before you land back on the treadmill.. or......?

NateDogg
01-26-2003, 06:57 AM
Originally posted by NotSoBig


If I tried that **** on my treadmill, someone would be picking me up off the floor. Do you just jump in the air and try to get your legs moving before you land back on the treadmill.. or......?

As I stated earlier in this thread, I would not want to try it on a treadmill. If you must do it indoors, a stationary bike (I have a trainer attached to my road bike that is perfect for it) or a jump rope would be better (read: safer) alternatives.

tryingtobebig
01-26-2003, 08:43 AM
I think I read this in Lyle McDonald's book...and I'm not sure how relavant it is. But I think he said that whether you burn fat during the excersice or burn carbs during the excersice is not whats really important, because they balance out. ie, if you burn fat during the cardio, you'll burn carbs afterwards and vice versa. Correct me if im wrong.

PowerManDL
01-26-2003, 09:09 AM
For practical purposes, that is what happens.

HIIT seems to skew things towards the fat-burning side of things.

LouFerrignosEar
01-26-2003, 03:50 PM
Doing HIIT on a treadmill seems incredibly stupid to me. Something's getting broken. Either the machine or you.

I usually work at a "normal" pace for 45 seconds, then go all out for 15 seconds. A single workout will be from 10-12 minutes (cycles). Is that enough? Is that a good ratio? I also don't eat for an hour afterwards, that's correct?

After a month or so of HIIT I haven't lost any "weight", but my body composition feels like it has changed. Due to the anaerobic aspects of HIIT, do you think it's an anabolic exercise? If my whole body feelsand looks leaner and tighter, but no weight was lost, may I have gained muscle?

PowerManDL
01-26-2003, 04:38 PM
Originally posted by LouFerrignosEar
Doing HIIT on a treadmill seems incredibly stupid to me. Something's getting broken. Either the machine or you.

I agree.

I usually work at a "normal" pace for 45 seconds, then go all out for 15 seconds. A single workout will be from 10-12 minutes (cycles). Is that enough? Is that a good ratio? I also don't eat for an hour afterwards, that's correct?

For someone cutting, that sounds almost perfect.

After a month or so of HIIT I haven't lost any "weight", but my body composition feels like it has changed. Due to the anaerobic aspects of HIIT, do you think it's an anabolic exercise? If my whole body feelsand looks leaner and tighter, but no weight was lost, may I have gained muscle?

That's exactly what its supposed to do :)

LouFerrignosEar
01-26-2003, 04:40 PM
Wicked!

NotSoBig
01-26-2003, 04:52 PM
Im doing it succesfully on a treadmill with no problems. Mine has a dial for speed adjustment though, so maybe its easier. I do the sprints at about 11 mph which is tops for my machine.

If my knees ever decided to give out, id be in some deep ****, but so far so good lol. :D

PowerManDL
01-29-2003, 07:20 PM
I found this article on HIIT training.

Its by James Krieger, a pretty smart fella:

http://www.wsu.edu/~strength/hiit.htm

PowerManDL
01-29-2003, 07:23 PM
http://www.wsu.edu/athletics/strength/intbfatmetab.htm

This too. WSU's just full of good stuff.

Raj
01-30-2003, 05:19 AM
isn't this similar to the BFL cardio program?

gino
01-30-2003, 10:37 AM
I always found I get leaner AND stronger when I have a couple sprint workouts each week... My intervals are a little different though - 6 or 7 sec sprint followed by a 30 second slow walk. Probably not as optimal for fat loss, but that's the only way I am able to do several sprints. Plus, my goal is speed rather than fat loss, but I still notice the fat loss. I haven't done any lengthy duration cardio(30 min+) in a couple years. Diet and sprints

PowerManDL
01-30-2003, 11:19 AM
w3rd

Biff Tannen
01-31-2003, 08:11 AM
I agree. The longest I have ran (or whatever) is about 20 min. The thing that I LOVE about this program is telling other about it, and having them come back to me and say:
"Well, I tried that workout you said, and it just wasn't enough, so I went another 20-30 after that..."
Ummmm well, when you WALK for most of it, I suppose it would be easy.
tuttut

EMan
02-06-2003, 03:23 PM
any recommendations to how often to do HIIT a week?

3 sessions in the off days?

cyclone
02-06-2003, 03:48 PM
I've been doing HIIT since mid December on an elliptical trainer, which works great BTW. I've been using a 15 sec. /15 sec. scheme. Two days ago I jumped my total duration from 8 mins. to 15 mins. with no problem. My main problem so far is that I haven't been losing any fat. I know I've been working hard enough judging by my heart rate. The only explaination I can come up with is that my endurance is too good. Even when I was in terrible shape I could always do cardio for long periods of time at a decent pace. This probably stems from my years in JH and HS running on the cross country team, thats six years doing anywhere from 20 to 50 miles a week.........definitely a good way to build endurance.

Maybe I need to shorten my intervals.......ideas anyone?

PowerManDL
02-06-2003, 03:50 PM
Are you pushing yourself hard enough on the high-intensity component?

5 seconds as hard as you can absolutely push yourself with 50 seconds to rest is going to be much more beneficial than a half-ass 30 seconds with a shorter rest period.

Ie, you need to push yourself to the absolute limit, and adjust your rest periods to account for that.

cyclone
02-06-2003, 03:52 PM
I routinely hit a heart rate of 140-145 (147 is 80% for me).

I see what you're getting at here......go balls to the wall for a short interval then rest up accordingly......I'll give it a try.
thanks

PowerManDL
02-06-2003, 03:55 PM
Don't worry about target heart rate. But if you want to use that as a guide, you need to be hitting 100% of target or higher for this to work. I know for me, the few times I've measured have been in the 170-180 bpm range.

Its better to not worry about that though, and just push yourself to the point where you know you can't keep up the intensity for more than a few seconds. You should literally want to be screaming in agony when its time to hit the low-intensity interval.

Just running slightly harder than normal isn't going to cut it.

PeaceBeWithYou
02-11-2003, 08:10 PM
This sounds fun, I wanna try it but I just started my weight training (4 weeks) so I don't know if I should. I'll definitely have to do this when it gets to cut time.

Hellrazor
02-19-2003, 04:44 PM
Awesome thread Matt, Ta !

Ya know I`ve been trying to get people to do these kind of workouts since I first read about them sometime last year on the boards but alas they`re either too lazy to even attempt them , or simply dont belive it will work. I even printed the articles off, took them to work and showed members but still no interest...bah, same with low volume training !

Every single person who steps in a gym should be given the address to this website it would make my job a hell of a lot easier.

Bryan
02-28-2003, 02:16 PM
I'm going to start doing HIIT with my bulking cycle this summer, I'm really interested to see how everything goes, ill keep you guys posted!

Erbas
03-04-2003, 12:02 PM
From what I understand, with regards to fat loss, HIIT's primary benefits come from the recovery period AFTER the session. Does anyone think that combining a traditional moderate cardio session with a HIIT session is beneficial?

What I am thinking is do a 25 min session at 65% then do 4, 20 sec. sprint intervals with 40 sec recovery between, then follow that by 3-5 min cool down.

This allows me to burn primarily fat for the first 25 min, then do the sprints to "stress" the system which would increase my recovery time and thus burn more post-workout calories than a moderate training session.

Any thoughts?

AJ_11
03-04-2003, 09:08 PM
I think that you will get more benefit in jsut doing the HIIT routine. When doing the traditional cardio session as you called it would deplete your your glycogen levels leaving you with less energy for the HIIT training. Plus in the end doing just the 20min HIIT session would have a better overall impact on cals burned after you are done with less of a chance of enrgy loss.

I would put 100% effort in the HIIT in the end I think that you will see better results.

Erbas
03-05-2003, 09:02 AM
I understand that a 100% HIIT training session would be an optimal option. I have concerns with too much HIIT during a cut being catabolic. I do HIIT twice a week, but I am looking to increase my calorie expenditure by throwing in a little more cardio that will not eat up too much muscle.

Doing moderate intensity cardio would not entirely deplete muscle glycogen and be burning primarily fat at that lower intensity, being almost completely aerobic. The mini HIIT session following the moderate session will not require the amount of energy as a true HIIT session, this is just something to peak my heart rate and try to extend recovery for a longer duration than is typical for a moderate session. The short HIIT session will hopefully not be enough to be catabolic.

I guess I'm looking for a portion of the benifits of a HIIT session without the potential of overstressing the system and losing muscle.

Hope that makes sense. I do agree with you regarding the HIIT being done 100% being the best.

Defkon1
03-05-2003, 05:25 PM
Originally posted by Erbas
From what I understand, with regards to fat loss, HIIT's primary benefits come from the recovery period AFTER the session. Does anyone think that combining a traditional moderate cardio session with a HIIT session is beneficial?


I would say yes to this question. HIIT training (as largely agreed) has its benefits in fat loss but using periodization with moderate - long duration workouts would make an excellent program for anyone wanting to lose the max amount of fat the main reason being that moderate intensity work will increase the amount of capillaries in the muscle so when it comes round to your HIIT training it now becomes a lot more effective than HIIT alone. Alone with a good weight training regime and a sound nutritional intake and finally consistency and I dont think you can go wrong

Bryan
03-06-2003, 09:58 AM
I found a great article on HIIT training...This article is from cbass.com, Clarence Bass' website.

"Fat burn is greater when exercise intensity is high." Metabolism

I believe in high-intensity aerobics. In Ripped 3, for bodybuilders, I recommended "a variety of relatively short and infrequent aerobic sessions interspersed with explosive muscular effort." In Lean For Life, published six years later, I emphasized high-intensity aerobics even more; I reduced the frequency of aerobic sessions to two times a week (in Ripped 3 I recommended up to four) and substantially increased the intensity. But it wasn't until recently, when my friend Richard Winett, Ph.D., publisher of Master Trainer, called my attention to new research findings, that I came to fully appreciate the superiority of high intensity aerobics compared to the usual prescription that heart rate be maintained between 60% and 80% of maximum.

As explained in the nearby FAQ (Low intensity aerobics?), high intensity aerobics burns the same amount of fat as low intensity, but the expenditure of calories is substantially greater; plus, intense aerobics produces a higher level of fitness. Importantly, the more fit you become, the more likely you are to use fat as fuel for any given activity. And now, research in Japan and in Canada shows that short, very intense aerobic sessions are amazingly effective for both fitness and fat loss.

Maximal oxygen uptake, or V02max, is generally regarded as the best single measure of aerobic fitness. As the rate of exercise increases, your body eventually reaches a limit for oxygen consumption. This limit is the peak of your aerobic capacity, or your V02max. As intensity increases beyond V02max, your body must shift to anaerobic (without oxygen) energy production. An oxygen debt begins to build at this point and blood lactate levels climb. In general terms, one's ability to continue exercising in the face of rising oxygen deficit and lactate levels is called anaerobic capacity.

This is important because many high-intensity sports (including basketball, football, soccer and speed skating) require a high level of both aerobic and anaerobic fitness. Clearly, total fitness involves both high V02max and high anaerobic capacity. A training protocol that develops both would be a godsend.

Izumi Tabata and his colleagues at the National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Tokyo, Japan, compared the effects of moderate-intensity endurance and high-intensity intermittent training on V02max and anaerobic capacity. (Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise (1996) 28, 1327-1330). Interestingly, the high-intensity protocol had been used by major members of the Japanese Speed Skating team for several years; it's a real-world training plan. As you will see, however, the protocol is unique among aerobic training programs for its intensity and brevity.

Many studies have been done on the effect of training on V02max, but little information has been available about the effect on anaerobic capacity. That's because until recently methods for measuring anaerobic capacity have been inadequate. This study used accumulated oxygen deficit to measure anaerobic energy release, and is one of the first to measure the effect of training on both aerobic and anaerobic capacity.

Notice that the duration of the moderate-intensity and the high-intensity protocols are drastically different: (excluding warm-ups) one hour compared to only about 4 minutes per training schedule

Tabata's moderate-intensity protocol will sound familiar; it's the same steady-state aerobic training done by many (perhaps most) fitness enthusiasts.

Here are the details (stay with me on this): In the moderate-intensity group, seven active young male physical education majors exercised on stationary bicycles 5 days per week for 6 weeks at 70% of V02max, 60 minutes each session. V02max was measured before and after the training and every week during the 6 week period. As each subject's V02max improved, exercise intensity was increased to keep them pedaling at 70% of their actual V02max. Maximal accumulated oxygen deficit was also measured, before, at 4 weeks and after the training.

A second group followed a high-intensity interval program. Seven students, also young and physically active, exercised five days per week using a training program similar to the Japanese speed skaters. After a 10-minute warm-up, the subjects did seven to eight sets of 20 seconds at 170% of V02max, with a 10 second rest between each bout. Pedaling speed was 90-rpm and sets were terminated when rpms dropped below 85. When subjects could complete more than 9 sets, exercise intensity was increased by 11 watts. The training protocol was altered one day per week. On that day, the students exercised for 30 minutes at 70% of V02max before doing 4 sets of 20 second intervals at 170% of V02max. This latter session was not continued to exhaustion. Again, V02max and anaerobic capacity was determined before, during and after the training.

In some respects the results were no surprise, but in others they may be ground breaking. The moderate-intensity endurance training program produced a significant increase in V02max (about 10%), but had no effect on anaerobic capacity. The high-intensity intermittent protocol improved V02max by about 14%; anaerobic capacity increased by a whopping 28%.

Dr. Tabata and his colleagues believe this is the first study to demonstrate an increase in both aerobic and anaerobic power. What's more, in an e-mail response to Dick Winett, Dr. Tabata said, "The fact is that the rate of increase in V02max [14% for the high-intensity protocol - in only 6 weeks] is one of the highest ever reported in exercise science." (Note, the students participating in this study were members of varsity table tennis, baseball, basketball, soccer and swimming teams and already had relatively high aerobic capacities.)

The results, of course, confirm the well-known fact that the results of training are specific. The intensity in the first protocol (70% of V02max) did not stress anaerobic components (lactate production and oxygen debt) and, therefore, it was predictable that anaerobic capacity would be unchanged. On the other hand, the subjects in the high-intensity group exercised to exhaustion ,and peak blood lactate levels indicated that anaerobic metabolism was being taxed to the max. So, it was probably also no big surprise that anaerobic capacity increased quite significantly.

What probably was a surprise, however, is that a 4 minute training program of very-hard 20 second repeats, in the words of the researchers, "may be optimal with respect to improving both the aerobic and the anaerobic energy release systems." That's something to write home about!

What About Fat Loss?

Angelo Tremblay, Ph.D., and his colleagues at the Physical Activities Sciences Laboratory, Laval University, Quebec, Canada, challenged the common belief among health professionals that low-intensity, long-duration exercise is the best program for fat loss. They compared the impact of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and high-intensity aerobics on fat loss. (Metabolism (1994) Volume 43, pp.814-818)

The Canadian scientists divided 27 inactive, healthy, non-obese adults (13 men, 14 women, 18 to 32 years old) into two groups. They subjected one group to a 20-week endurance training (ET) program of uninterrupted cycling 4 or 5 times a week for 30 to 45 minutes; the intensity level began at 60% of heart rate reserve and progressed to 85%. (For a 30-year-old, this would mean starting at a heart rate of about 136 and progressing to roughly 170 bpm, which is more intense than usually prescribed for weight or fat loss.)

The other group did a 15-week program including mainly high-intensity-interval training (HIIT). Much like the ET group, they began with 30-minute sessions of continuous exercise at 70% of maximum heart rate reserve (remember, they were not accustomed to exercise), but soon progressed to 10 to 15 bouts of short (15 seconds progressing to 30 seconds) or 4 to 5 long (60 seconds progressing to 90 seconds) intervals separated by recovery periods allowing heart rate to return to 120-130 beats per minute. The intensity of the short intervals was initially fixed at 60% of the maximal work output in 10 seconds, and that of the long bouts corresponded to 70% of the individual maximum work output in 90 seconds. Intensity on both was increased 5% every three weeks.

As you might expect, the total energy cost of the ET program was substantially greater than the HIIT program. The researchers calculated that the ET group burned more than twice as many calories while exercising than the HIIT program. But (surprise, surprise) skinfold measurements showed that the HIIT group lost more subcutaneous fat. "Moreover," reported the researchers, "when the difference in the total energy cost of the program was taken into account..., the subcutaneous fat loss was ninefold greater in the HIIT program than in the ET program." In short, the HIIT group got 9 times more fat-loss benefit for every calorie burned exercising.

How can that be?

Dr. Tremblay's group took muscle biopsies and measured muscle enzyme activity to determine why high-intensity exercise produced so much more fat loss. I'll spare you the details (they are technical and hard to decipher), but this is their bottom line: "[Metabolic adaptations resulting from HIIT] may lead to a better lipid utilization in the postexercise state and thus contribute to a greater energy and lipid deficit." In other words, compared to moderate-intensity endurance exercise, high- intensity intermittent exercise causes more calories and fat to be burned following the workout. Citing animal studies, they also said it may be that appetite is suppressed more following intense intervals. (Neither group was placed on a diet.)

The next time someone pipes up about the fat-burn zone, ask them if they are familiar with the Tabata and Tremblay research reports.

Bryan
03-06-2003, 12:33 PM
I did my first HIIT session this afternoon. OH MY GOD!

I did it for about 10 mins, 15 second of high intensity and 45-60 of low. I was doing it on my cycling bike, So I just closed my eyes and pedal'd my ass off. Dear god HIIT is an amazing workout.

Afterwards I felt sick to my stomach, so I had to lay down for about 30 mins. AMAZING WORKOUT! I love it now. I think I might of overdid it today for my first session tho.

Edit: Just read the entire thread over again, and for the people claiming to do 1min high intensity intervals, you obviously arent going hard enough. I was starting to scream in pain after 9-10 seconds of the high intensity intervals or maybe I'm a wimp :(

So no eating until 1 hour after training?

Defkon1
03-06-2003, 02:09 PM
I havent done much HIT training at all in the last 3-4 months coz Ive concentrated on my long distance running but im going back to doing a little more after reading some of the interesting posts here.

Why not use a rower for this HIIT work, specially the concept 2 rowers they are excellent for interval training besides which they are dependant on how much u put into em which means increased element of safety while working at so high intensities.

Clark Kent
03-18-2003, 02:59 PM
Will HIIT training work with swimming?

djreef
03-28-2003, 11:40 AM
Clark,

HIIT would work with swimming if you swam your ass of with a 40lb weight belt on, then released it for your down period. You'd have to keep putting the belt back on, though, and that would be a pain. And I'd only do this in shallow water, in case the belt got stuck.

I use the recom bike at the gym for my HIIT. I cruise for about 3-5 min, on level 4, to get warmed up. I then crank the resistance up to 20, and pedal my ass off, 135-140 rpms. I usually go until the burn starts setting in my quads, which coincidentally is usually about 15 seconds, then I back it down for 45 seconds. I repeat this cycle 25 times, or until I'm trashed.

How long are most folks doing this for (duration in total minutes)? I go 28-30 min including warmup. I have no idea what's optimal, I just kinda go by feel. There are some days I feel I could tack on another 5 minutes, though. Just wondering if I should.

DJ
= 8-->{I>

PowerManDL
03-28-2003, 12:17 PM
Won't hurt.

Shao-LiN
03-28-2003, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by Erbas
From what I understand, with regards to fat loss, HIIT's primary benefits come from the recovery period AFTER the session. Does anyone think that combining a traditional moderate cardio session with a HIIT session is beneficial?


Sounds interesting, but do you really think you'd have enough energy to persue another bout of cardio after HIIT or vice versa? That is, unless, you mean separate days or spaced out throughout the day or something.

Coleman
03-30-2003, 08:33 PM
When you say recovery do you mean to competely stop, start walking or run slower.

PowerManDL
03-30-2003, 08:35 PM
Its up to you....whatever allows you to get your wind back.

Coleman
03-30-2003, 08:38 PM
Okay cool.

We used to do something like this in kickboxing. We would sprint from one telephone pole to the next then walk to the next one, then sprint again etc. Ended up sprinting about 10 seconds then walking 25.

Coleman
03-30-2003, 08:38 PM
One more thing, how long should this be done for? Until I cant go any more? What would be a good maximum time to aim for?

PowerManDL
03-30-2003, 09:00 PM
Just go by your capacity, really....there's no reason to have a set time unless you're training for a specific thing.

Xg74
03-30-2003, 09:39 PM
So for maximum fat loss (or metabolization, for a better word) capability using HIIT (while bulking), is the consensus to not eat afterwards? Or to eat as if it were a normal workout? I may have misunderstood all that has been said. :help:

PowerManDL
03-30-2003, 09:52 PM
I eat.

You may choose not to.

Its up to you.

Ed C.
03-30-2003, 10:22 PM
I've been doing 10sec/20sec for about 15 minutes and I've been seeing a lot of good results with it. Finally seeing my 6 pack.

Scott S
04-07-2003, 12:08 PM
Perhaps this was asked in another thread, but I'm new here -- would the protein/dextrose shakes I usually drink before and after a long run be unnecessary with HIIT? I can't help but think that some degree of catabolism will happen with HIIT. Or would that screw up the whole mechanism of it?

Thanks.

Smoothie
04-07-2003, 06:16 PM
Same question as Scott S, but also when should I do these workouts? I'm on a three day split, should I do them after my workouts, or on off days? My goal is to maintain muscle wieght and lose a few pounds of fat.
Thanks!

Xg74
04-08-2003, 08:05 PM
Those questions have been answered many times in this thread. In short, I would not do HIIT before or after your leg day, and it is up to you whether or not to replenish nutrients after HIIT.

djreef
04-09-2003, 09:34 AM
Personally, for myself, I don't train for at least 2 days after doing HIIT. I mean, I could, but I just wouldn't be worth a sh!t as far as my weights are concerned. I also reserve the right to replace a HIIT day with an activity I enjoy, like softball, or racquetball. Still lots of all out sprinting with rest pauses between. I find that cross training with other sports works well, as long as I don't overdo it.

DJ
= 8-->{I>

tryingtobebig
04-09-2003, 01:43 PM
Powerman, got a question for you.
In another thread, someone stated that HIIT is a glycogen fueled workout, much like weight training, and you agreed.
In the first post here, you said "lactate blocks fat oxidation, leaving myoglobin to fuel the oxidative process. Once it gets used up, fat utilization is shut off in favor of glycogen metabolism. "
I think I may be understanding this wrong. Once the myoglobin is depleted, you want to stop the sprint in order to restore myglobin for the next sprint and to prevent the shift from fat to glycogen as fuel. Right? I'm kinda confused. Care to clear me up a little?

bigkevin20
04-13-2003, 05:56 PM
I have been doing HIIT 4 to 5 days a week, for 16 minutes, 2 minute intervals fast sprint, slow resistance walk on a eliptical or stepper machine. I have lost 4% fat in 40 days along with a ECA. I am convinced it works, give it a try on your cut if you have not.

PowerManDL
04-13-2003, 06:03 PM
Originally posted by tryingtobebig
Powerman, got a question for you.
In another thread, someone stated that HIIT is a glycogen fueled workout, much like weight training, and you agreed.
In the first post here, you said "lactate blocks fat oxidation, leaving myoglobin to fuel the oxidative process. Once it gets used up, fat utilization is shut off in favor of glycogen metabolism. "
I think I may be understanding this wrong. Once the myoglobin is depleted, you want to stop the sprint in order to restore myglobin for the next sprint and to prevent the shift from fat to glycogen as fuel. Right? I'm kinda confused. Care to clear me up a little?

While active, you're never totally aerobic. There's some degree of glycolysis occuring in any active muscle.

The idea for that particular variant of HIIT is to attempt to increase fat oxidation during the session, by making sure myoglobin is available to continue the process.

The goal as it was outlined is to keep the oxidation occuring as much as possible.

I don't feel its necessary, or even particularly more effective to do it that way, though. Its more of something to keep in mind while you're picking your training methods.

AJ_11
04-14-2003, 08:18 PM
Okay quick question: Is High Intensity described as speed or power. I mean if I did it on an eliptical, should I just go as fast as I can or should I upped the levels and make it tough.

djreef
04-15-2003, 09:19 AM
You should do whatever it takes to get your pulse up in as short a time as possible. That prob means both jacking up resistance, AND going balls out.

DJ
= 8-->{I>

bigkevin20
04-15-2003, 09:38 AM
I go as fast as I can with resistance. I Look like a maniac running for his life, for about 2 minutes next to all the other cardio girls. Then I'm walking real slow with high resistance for 2 and so on.

themightypuck
04-15-2003, 04:13 PM
I highly recommend the concept2 rower for indoor high intensity. Just make sure you know how to properly use the machine to avoid injury. I'm doing treadmill for now because I'm just starting out and c2's are pretty hardcore. I'll be doing HIIT on C2 starting in May.

bigkevin20
04-17-2003, 08:20 AM
Hardest form of HIIT I have ever done was on a stepper. It is so hard to cheat if you slow down you fall to the bottom. I almost died trying to keep my self up when it was on level 14.

Tbizz
04-23-2003, 11:21 PM
Im convinced....I just read the whole 5 pages about HIIT and I'm goin to try to incorporate it into my WBB#2 off days. You guys make the results sound quick! I have to give this a try.

Tbizz
04-24-2003, 12:51 PM
Only thing I didnt pick up was how often are we supposed to try this HIIT? Between workouts on off days?

Maki Riddington
04-24-2003, 02:01 PM
1-2 days a week. It also depends on the intensity and duration of each interval.

djreef
04-24-2003, 02:07 PM
I use it on my off days, but I pay close attention to my poundages when I'm training. If my weights start slipping, I either cut back on my HIIT, or put an extra day, or two, of rest in there somewhere. You just gotta go by feel. Life sometimes gets in the way of hard schedules, so don't make yourself neurotic about sticking to certain days, or you'll end up overtraining. Overtraining is real easy to do on HIIT when you mix in hardcore workouts. No point in burning yourself up with it.

DJ
= 8-->{I>

FortifiedIron
04-26-2003, 11:20 AM
Love HIIT. Its awsome when combined with GPP. This i feel is the best cardio a strength athlete could ever do. 4-6 intervals+Weighte and None weighted GPP work followed.


Kc

Bryan
04-29-2003, 02:05 PM
HIIT only gets better the more you do it, I've worked myself upto 14 sprints now. I'm doing 15/45 high/low intensity on my bike. I usually take a break around the 8 min mark and walk around for 1-2 mins to get myself back together. I dont know how you guys do 2 mins of high intensity, I have trouble getting to 15 seconds sometimes if I tried to go any longer i'd probably fall over and die hehe.

Also I get my heart rate up around 180-183 after my high intensity, thats 90% of my max heartrate. I hope thats high enough AND safe heh.

Also I'm going to be doing a clean bulk this summer, around july. I was wondering if it'd be ok to leave my hiit routine. Say 15mins of hiit 2-3 times a week?

GhettoSmurf
04-29-2003, 07:31 PM
yeah man, HIIT is fine even if your bulking IMO. it doesnt give you an excuse NOT to bulk cleanly, but it might help keep the fat gain down a bit.

Ironman8
04-29-2003, 07:53 PM
Also, if you're bulking on junk food, it'll might clean out your arteries for a while :D

Bryan
04-29-2003, 08:13 PM
clean clean clean bulk! low gi carbs, efa's and protien my friends! Just the same as my cutting diet with but more calories and more carbs

GhettoSmurf
04-30-2003, 04:45 AM
then i say yeah, go for it! :D

MonkeyBoy
05-02-2003, 07:00 AM
I'm sure someone has posted this(lots of replies to go through)

or you make think it is silly

http://www.cool.mb.ca/u49th/images/cardio.pdf

Praetorian
05-02-2003, 02:39 PM
matt, i truly madly deeply love you.

im gonna give HIIT a chance.

Tbizz
05-05-2003, 01:29 PM
Im not sure if you're supposed to start noticeing differences with HIIT real quicly or not but I've been notiv=ciing muscles on me more defined than I've seen before and the only thing I've been doin is HIIT 3-4 times a week for 2 weeks! When Im at home Im able to go to the track and run/walk and when Im at school, my school is soo Sh!tty that it doesnt even have a track so I run up and down the stairwell. IM up to 9 minutes and Im surely stickin to this plan. The beach will be sweet this year. :D

Silverback
05-05-2003, 02:42 PM
Sounds good, but how would i alter it when training for soccer?

I play striker, which involves shorts bursts 30-40yards then being able to recover quickly so that you can do it again as soon as required.

Any help would be appreciated

B to the R

Jim Rob
05-06-2003, 04:22 PM
Are pretzels in the bag, ie Rold Gold, considered junkfood, or low GI carbs?

Maki Riddington
05-07-2003, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by Big-Ron
Sounds good, but how would i alter it when training for soccer?

I play striker, which involves shorts bursts 30-40yards then being able to recover quickly so that you can do it again as soon as required.

Any help would be appreciated

B to the R

*** What are you asking?

greekboy80
05-08-2003, 10:37 AM
i just finished my first session of HIIT...holy Sh*t!!!! i havent sweated this much since being in a sauna. correct me if im wrong, but i feel wasted, totally worthless after the first session. is that normal. my calves are also shot. its been prob 20 minutes and i havent stoped sweating. i mean its good cause the Cr*p worked but are the symptoms normal...im even having a hard time typing. im on the CKD diet would this matter. any info would be good. thanks.

Tbizz
05-08-2003, 11:22 AM
Yeah, like I said earlier, the first sessions kick your A$$. You notice aches and pains you havent felt in a while and yea, you get exhausted. I have no idea what CDK is so cant help ya there

greekboy80
05-08-2003, 11:50 AM
sorry dude i meant CKD....im so exhausted that i cant even spell anymoye, even my hands are shaking. damn, but its def. a great work out even for 10-15 min. my HR was up for the next 1 1/2 hours. anyways...

Tru
05-18-2003, 06:30 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
HIIT is glycogen fueled......meaning it wouldn't be very fun on an empty stomach.

I read that HIIT is most effective in the morning, but it's best to have whey before you do it.

geoffgarcia
05-23-2003, 11:59 AM
I was a sprinter 100/200/400 in college, and this concept of HIIT was just a plain old workout that I did day in and day out, roughly 5 days a week, 8 months a year for about 8 years of my life

Depending on the day we would do workouts of ten 100m sprints, in around 12-13 seconds w/ 30-60 second breaks
workouts of six to ten 200m sprints, in about 24-26 seconds w/ 60 second breaks
workouts of four to eight 400m sprints, in about 54-60 seconds w/ 60-90 second breaks

so I feel I have a decent idea of what this will/won't do for a person. (based on my experiences and watching teammates)

I think a lot of people are overhyping this style of workout.

Thats just my humble opinion.

PS, anyone that thinks you can do this style workout on a machine is smoking some crack (or ur just very very very slow)

Natural_O
05-25-2003, 05:50 PM
Hi Powerman, this is a very interesting thread and it makes me want to start the HIIT training as opposed to standard aerobics. I have some concerns and some questions however. I am always worried about losing muscle when I do regular cardio, especially in the legs since that is always the first place I lose muscle when I get overtrained or diet too much. If I use sprinting/slow walking for my HIIT, what chance would I have of losing muscle in the legs? Also, I've read on this thread that some people take 1-2 days off of weight training after doing an HIIT session. If I weight train 4 days per week (mon, wed, fri and sat), when would I do the HIIT if I train legs on wed? Should I try it Sat after my last weight training session of the week? That would be 3 days after my leg workout and 4 days before my next leg training session. Or, would it be better to do it on Sunday which is an off day from the weights? If I do it on a Sunday, how would that affect my Monday morning weight training session? How often should I do HIIT, once per week or twice? In the interest of preserving muscle, would it be possible to do standard cardio (moderate speed for 45 min) earlier in the week and then HIIT training later in the week, several days after my leg training workout? Sorry for the numerous questions, it's just that I have trained very hard these last few months trying to increase the size of my legs and I don't want to lose it now before I even start my diet yet.

PowerManDL
05-25-2003, 06:00 PM
Originally posted by Natural_O
Hi Powerman, this is a very interesting thread and it makes me want to start the HIIT training as opposed to standard aerobics. I have some concerns and some questions however. I am always worried about losing muscle when I do regular cardio, especially in the legs since that is always the first place I lose muscle when I get overtrained or diet too much. If I use sprinting/slow walking for my HIIT, what chance would I have of losing muscle in the legs?

Well, its all going to depend on your diet at the end of the day, however, since HIIT is by and large an anaerobic process, it, at least in my experience, tends not to chew up muscle the same way that endurance work does. I can't give you a 100% guarantee that you won't lose muscle, but I can say that you'd be better off doing some sort of interval work as opposed to flat-out distance running, though.

Also, I've read on this thread that some people take 1-2 days off of weight training after doing an HIIT session. If I weight train 4 days per week (mon, wed, fri and sat), when would I do the HIIT if I train legs on wed? Should I try it Sat after my last weight training session of the week? That would be 3 days after my leg workout and 4 days before my next leg training session. Or, would it be better to do it on Sunday which is an off day from the weights?If I do it on a Sunday, how would that affect my Monday morning weight training session? How often should I do HIIT, once per week or twice? In the interest of preserving muscle, would it be possible to do standard cardio (moderate speed for 45 min) earlier in the week and then HIIT training later in the week, several days after my leg training workout?

I'd play it by feel, really. If you're up to it Saturday, then go for it. If you feel you need the rest, it won't hurt anything to wait till Sunday, either.

In your particular case (I know you're a big dude), you might want to leave it to just one HIIT session per week, and follow up with 1-2 "traditional" cardio sessions for the remainder. I've found that mingling the HIIT work with 20-60 minutes of "regular" cardio can be pretty effective as well.

Sorry for the numerous questions, it's just that I have trained very hard these last few months trying to increase the size of my legs and I don't want to lose it now before I even start my diet yet.

Oh I can understand that.....and I think you'll be pleased. HIIT work has done wonders for myself and most everyone I know that's tried it. The beauty of it being anaerobic in nature is that it does have the propensity to spare muscle tissue and really focus on the fat reserves; however, it does have the price of having to treat it almost like a light weight-training session in terms of diet and rest required.

I think that if you leave it to one, maybe two sessions per week, you shouldn't have too much trouble.

NateDogg
05-26-2003, 07:00 AM
Hey Power,

What are your thoughts on something like sets of squats or deadlifts at a very light weight, done relatively quickly for HIIT?

For example: squat 95 lbs as quickly as possible, while staying in control, keeping form and not bouncing, for 5-10 seconds. Then rest for whatever, say 10-20 seconds. Repeat?

PowerManDL
05-26-2003, 12:38 PM
Nate, I've been doing stuff like that for quite awhile, since you mention it. In fact, I'm letting something similar serve as my "cardio" right now.

Ever try it with Olympic lifts? Wow.

NateDogg
05-26-2003, 01:05 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
Nate, I've been doing stuff like that for quite awhile, since you mention it. In fact, I'm letting something similar serve as my "cardio" right now.

Ever try it with Olympic lifts? Wow.

I have not tried it yet. I just think it much more likely for me to do, rather than sprinting at a track, biking, etc. I am definitely going to try it. Thanks.

AJ_11
05-26-2003, 02:37 PM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
Nate, I've been doing stuff like that for quite awhile, since you mention it. In fact, I'm letting something similar serve as my "cardio" right now.

Ever try it with Olympic lifts? Wow.

That is an interesting concept. I have thought about trying it but feared that muscle will get too much work even though it is low intensity compared to lifting.

Now when would be the best time to incorporate such a routine. Say if Monday was back(deadlift day) when would the best time to do this training be. Considering that I am doing squats two days after.

PowerManDL
05-26-2003, 03:09 PM
Its hard to do it in a "traditional" bodybuilding routine; but I don't have a split in that sense so its a lot easier for me to incorporate it.

If I were gonna do it, I'd do it on the day of the exercise itself; but bear in mind this *will* take away from your workable volume.

Tru
05-28-2003, 02:46 PM
What do you eat postworkout for HIIT?

And is there a need to take breaks? Like should someone do HIIT for 12 weeks straight, or take a week off around the 6th week or something?

Once you've done it for 8 weeks, do you just start back up at the beginning and do 4 minutes?

Tru
05-28-2003, 05:23 PM
And if the goal is to drop bodyfat but maintain muscle would it be best to do it in the AM? It seems most people say AM cardio drops bodyfat faster.

I'm gonna try to limit carbs to 200g or under throughout the day, is that low enough to drop bodyfat or should it be lower?

I planned on doing it around 11:00Am-2:00PM, somewhere in there but I might do it right when I get up after having some whey with water.

NEOPRENE
06-14-2003, 05:03 PM
HITT is the sheot!! Way better than riding a bike at the same pace for 20-30 mins.

DylanWaneIV
06-16-2003, 10:50 PM
My cock has grown an amazing 4 inches ever since starting HIIT. God I love it so.

Majestic
06-17-2003, 07:45 PM
Well PowerMan, I tried it today out in the back lawn.

Three.

THREE fookin' sprints is all I could muster.

Sprinted for 15 seconds (3 diagonal lengths of the yard), jogged for 45 seconds.

My TEETH felt like they were sweating, for cryin' out loud!

Granted, I enjoyed it much more than cardio (although cardio doesn't make me feel like I'm near death).

I'm just not sure how much I got out of 3 "working" minutes today. I'm enthusiastic about it, nonetheless.

ChrisH
06-18-2003, 05:50 AM
I tried this on a runner last night. 30s sprint, 40s rest. I just kept it at sprint speed, hopped on for 30, hopped off for 40 and repeated for 12 intervals. OMG how much was I sweating...

Blight
06-22-2003, 12:59 AM
Here's a question. Say you use HIIT for long enough to lose all the fat you want. In order to maintain your present shape, should you continue to use HIIT or just switch to cardio at a low/moderate instensity? :confused:

Scott S
06-26-2003, 05:26 PM
If you kept lifting and ate *exactly* the right amount, there's no reason you'd *have* to continue any kind of cardio.

Mystic Eric
06-26-2003, 07:32 PM
Originally posted by ChrisH
I tried this on a runner last night. 30s sprint, 40s rest. I just kept it at sprint speed, hopped on for 30, hopped off for 40 and repeated for 12 intervals. OMG how much was I sweating...

30 seconds sprint is too long. There's no way you can maintain a maximum intensity sprint for 30 seconds.

Jim Rob
07-03-2003, 04:53 PM
Originally posted by Scott S
If you kept lifting and ate *exactly* the right amount, there's no reason you'd *have* to continue any kind of cardio.

To elaborate on what Scott said, I used HIIT in coordination w/a good diet to cut down to my desired weight. Now that I've achieved my goal, I use HIIT to allow myself to be more lenient with my diet. I feel it allows me to be less strict on myself.

KAMAZON
07-06-2003, 04:34 PM
Fellaz, I live on a big ass hill. I just started teh Atkins diet today and am planning on working out about 3-4 times a week doing weights. HIIT sounds very intresting from what I have read, so what if you live on a hill? is there anything any ofyou would recommend for doing this on a hill? I was planning on doing the 6-9 interval going up the hill ballz out. The extra incline should make sure that I am pushing myself harder than I would on a flat surface. Agree or disagree?

Sayiajin Prince
07-12-2003, 05:22 PM
im loving doing HIIT on the eliptical runner.

CoASH
08-24-2003, 12:46 AM
You say to eat for HIIT like you're eating for a weights session

so protein and carbs beforehand, and after HIIT, straightaway protein and simple sugars?

soz if this has been answered...I read up to page 5 and gave up

shansen008
08-24-2003, 01:27 AM
Would running bleachers be considered a good HIIT session? Balls out to the top then walk to the bottom....rinse repeat? We used to do that for basketball conditioning, it always felt great. What ive been doing for my "cardio" on between days (currently doing wbb1) is riding the bike doing the hill program for 24 minutes at level 10 of 12.

WiNgS
08-24-2003, 03:58 AM
Originally posted by CoASH
You say to eat for HIIT like you're eating for a weights session

so protein and carbs beforehand, and after HIIT, straightaway protein and simple sugars?

soz if this has been answered...I read up to page 5 and gave up

i havent read the thread but HIIT doesnt burn fat in the short amount of time you are doing it 12 - 16mins... its the oxygen deficit during that time which causes the fat oxidation for 24 hours afterwards

CoASH
08-24-2003, 06:08 AM
yes.....very nice to know
now tell me something about the nutrition, as was in the question :)

Scott S
08-24-2003, 10:52 AM
I don't think high-internsity running is a good idea on Atkins. HIIT is glycogen-fueled, and even though you're trying to burn fat, your body NEEDS that glycogen NOW! So it'll break down some of that handy muscle to do so. If you are intent on doing Atkins, I'd take in some carbs beforehard so your glycogen levels don't get too low. You'd be able to re-enter ketosis soon enough afterward.

The more I think about it, I don't think Atkins is that great an idea in general. The underlying premise (that by reducing insulin to extremely low levels, no fat will be stored) seems to be flawed, as people can still gain weight in the absence of insulin.

The Dude
11-03-2003, 12:04 AM
Isn't Atkins dead???

Scott S
11-03-2003, 11:29 AM
Umm, yes. But the diet isn't.


Hope this helps.

spl_373
01-14-2004, 12:12 PM
its just stating stuff you guys already know. if you go hard for a short perieod of time your going to burn alot of calories but do nothing in terms of increasing your cardiovascular endurance. result skinny person who cant run a mile!!

what does cardiovascular endurance have to do with fat loss? HIIT is by far more muscle sparing than other forms of cardio. If you do it right. It is important to treat it as a weightraining workout in terms of nutrition.

AllUp
01-14-2004, 12:38 PM
Isn't Atkins dead???


Umm, yes. But the diet isn't.
Hope this helps.

ROFL..

Saint Patrick
01-14-2004, 12:49 PM
It is important to treat it as a weightraining workout in terms of nutrition.


I don't think a big protein shake with dextrose is needed after HIIT. You can replenish glycogen with lower GI, slower digesting carbs.

d'Anconia
05-25-2005, 12:26 AM
I'm so glad that this is a sticky... this is a great thread.

I'm amped to start my HIIT

dissipate
07-28-2005, 07:57 AM
powerman, the two WSU links don't work anymore... do they still exist at some other location?

VDubb
07-28-2005, 05:42 PM
Did my first Guerilla Cardio from the link provided earlier in this post - and I'd have to say it was tough - but awesome!! Felt like I did way more than my usual daily steady state cardio.

I'm gonna stick with this for a while!

MixmasterNash
07-28-2005, 06:33 PM
I guess this is the active HIT thread now...

I did some powerlifting inspired HIT today... http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showpost.php?p=1148406&postcount=859

Ouch.

poopoozilla
07-28-2005, 06:45 PM
my gym has these bad ass treadmills that actually have a speed interval training function. you input your jog speed and then the sprint speed that you want. when you're ready to switch just hit the button and the speed changes, just like that. HIT rocks. I have been doing it for a few weeks and I now have -3.5 percent bodyfat. ha ha ha.

Big & Tall
08-20-2005, 02:11 PM
Okay, I've seen the question asked several times in here, but not much for answers (only one, from Saint Patty). What about pre- and post- HIIT nutrition? SP said low GI; is that the general consensus? BTW, no offense SP, just looking for other opinions.

I've recently started HIIT (2 or 3 sessions so far) and it has been stomping me.

Teh BDK
08-20-2005, 02:12 PM
The title of this thread should really be 'More reasons WHY HIIT rules.'

djreef
08-20-2005, 05:27 PM
I treat my HIIT workouts just like my regular weight training sessions, and eat and drink accordingly. Protein + carbs + fishoil post workout, then a good dinner a little later.

DJ

235orbust
04-02-2006, 01:15 PM
hmm...if anyone is in the exersize machine making buisness that would be a nice function for a treadmill to have...a program that gets real fast for 10-15 seconds then automatically slows down

ddegroff
04-04-2006, 10:19 AM
Would HIIT on rowing machine work, doing 45sec work/90sec rest? Thats about the same ratio as 6/9.

ArchAngel777
04-04-2006, 10:31 AM
Would HIIT on rowing machine work, doing 45sec work/90sec rest? Thats about the same ratio as 6/9.

It sure would... Keep in mind that HIIT has many methods. The 6/9 ratio isn't the only method. You could run with 4/9 if you wanted too. The key is to push yourself hard on the high end and then slow things down to catch your breath and repeat.

ddegroff
04-04-2006, 10:57 AM
cool thats what I thought. Everything I read on HIIT has really short intervals. So I was just making sure, it felt great thats for sure!


Edit: Arch, i like the disclaimer in your sig, LOL.

Anthony
04-04-2006, 01:46 PM
Yeah, you can do longer intervals if you want. The reason why short intervals are promoted is because they give you more bang for your buck.

Built
04-04-2006, 02:15 PM
Althougth possible, I cannot imagine anyone advocating it to someone they are liable for. Chances of breaking one's face I would imagine, would increase exponentially with hopping on and off a treadmill moving at sprint speed!

I do my HIIT with two treadmills side by side, one set at a sprint, one at a fast incline walk.

It's actually kinda fun, especially with a partner. We set up three treadmills, the centre one set on "sprint", and take 30-second turns on the middle one. I understand it looks quite comical...

colin
04-04-2006, 05:18 PM
It's actually kinda fun, especially with a partner. We set up three treadmills, the centre one set on "sprint", and take 30-second turns on the middle one. I understand it looks quite comical...

hahaha. I'd love to see that. I'd fall on the like the first or second transition. I'd have to wear a mouthguard and a helmet.

kad
04-04-2006, 06:11 PM
Yeah, you can do longer intervals if you want. The reason why short intervals are promoted is because they give you more bang for your buck.
Short intervals, as in would 10sec/50sec work/rest intervals on the rower work? Or 15/45, or 20/40? I was thinking something on the order of 15 intervals using that.

Anthony
04-04-2006, 06:49 PM
Short intervals, as in would 10sec/50sec work/rest intervals on the rower work? Or 15/45, or 20/40? I was thinking something on the order of 15 intervals using that.

Any of those would be fine. I personally use 10/20 and 20/10 (tabata).

GrumpyFlex
05-22-2006, 11:57 AM
great thread...

I have read a lot about HIIT in the past, but never incorporated it into my routine...

Quick question though.... At my current stage my body is losing weight very fast.. Id like for a majority of this weight to be fat, but I know alas some will come from muscle. (I am a gastric bypass patient) Im averaging about 1000 calories of food per day and burning on average of 500 - 800 cals per day in activity... (Not including lefestyle and basal) which puts me at about 4500 cals burned per day.

Im currently doing cross traning between 3 days of machine cardio 30 -35 mins (treadmill, cycle, and eliptical) and 2 days of spinning, all in the morning after my weight training....

Would substituting 2 days of machine training for HIIT be more beneficial while keeping the spinning, or am I going to run myself into the dirt

d'Anconia
05-22-2006, 01:03 PM
Wow, GrumpyFlex I don't know how big you are but 1000 Calories a day of food is VERY low. In fact if you go that low your body might go into survival mode and slow down your metabolism a bunch (making the decrease in calories less useful). I doubt you could do much HIIT with such low energy levels.

Anyway Anthony, from what you've read, is there any real argument against slightly longer rest-intervals? Aside from sessions taking up more time, of course.

Anthony
05-22-2006, 01:10 PM
Anyway Anthony, from what you've read, is there any real argument against slightly longer rest-intervals? Aside from sessions taking up more time, of course.

Any type of HIIT will probably be better than SSC, but based on the studies posted above, shorter intervals are better. I wouldn't worry about it too much, but obviously a 10 second sprint and 2 minute rest won't produce the same body response as a 10 second sprint and 20 second rest. I just use 10/20 and 20/10 because that means 2 intervals per minute, which makes it easier when watching the clock, etc.

GrumpyFlex
05-22-2006, 02:02 PM
Wow, GrumpyFlex I don't know how big you are but 1000 Calories a day of food is VERY low. In fact if you go that low your body might go into survival mode and slow down your metabolism a bunch (making the decrease in calories less useful). I doubt you could do much HIIT with such low energy levels.

Im at about 340 now.... I am a Gastric Bypass patient, so eating is almost a chore for me.. however I do realize I should increase my caloric intake based upon what Ive been reading... Im thinking another 500 calories or one more protein shake.

I am eating 5 times a day trying to stem off the survival mode, tricking my body that we're still doing ok :idea:

I dont want to lose too much muscle during this transisiton, so the HIIT looks very appealing... Thinking I might scrap my Spin class tomorrow for it and just spin twice a week and HIIT three times a week...

From what I read it seems that the eliptical may be the best way to train this way.... because of the ability to immediatly increase and decrease (unlike the belt speed up on a treadmill). My endurance is pretty good from the spinning. What would a recommendation be for intervals starting out 10/20??

Anthony
05-22-2006, 02:09 PM
Spinning is basically HIIT. 10/20 is a good pace. Shoot for 5 minutes (10 intervals) and then increase from there. I've tried HIIT on the crosstrainer/eliptical and it sucked, but maybe you have a decent brand that actually allows a full out sprint.

d'Anconia
05-22-2006, 02:09 PM
Okay I was assuming you weighed a lot less. My bad.

shizonamy
03-03-2011, 07:27 AM
Can anyone advise me what do do in regards to cardioworkout, I'm pretty strong in the weights department but can't seem to shake off excess fat around the 'love handle' area

I do the following 4 x week

20 mins on the treadmill

2 mins at 11 km/h
then 1 min at 13 km/h
then 2 mins at 11 km/h
then 1 min at 13 km/h
then 2 mins at 12 km/h
then 1 min at 14 km/h
then 2 mins at 12 km/h
then 1 min at 14 km/h
then 2 mins at 13 km/h
then 1 min at 15 km/h
then 2 mins at 13 km/h
then 1 min at 15 km/h
then 1 min at 16 km/h
then 1 min at 17 km/h

My diet is ok, but I've stopped taking the whey protein, do I really need this if I consume enough protein?

Thanks