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Victor
02-17-2003, 04:07 AM
1) These days instead of using stir fried method, I simply marinate my chicken breast and put them inside a fridge. Next day I place them inside a microwave for about 4-5 minutes and start eating them once cooked. Question is- By cooking my chicken (or any other foods) in a microwave, will it remove any of the nutrition value of it, more importantly, will the chicken still contain it's protein amount?

2) It's seems that by eating food that are BBQed, deep fried, etc are unhealthy, while food that are steamed, grilled, etc are healthy options. Where will you rank food that are cooked from the microwave? Healthy or unhealthy?

Wizard
02-17-2003, 04:40 AM
Don't cook any meats in the microwave. Use the oven.

NotSoBig
02-17-2003, 04:44 AM
It's been said that microwaves do remove nutritional value from food. The first I heard of this was when I had my daughter 4 months ago. All the baby formula manufacturers say that if you microwave their bottles, it removes a lot of the nutritional value.

I eat chicken almost every night, and I either sautee it on the stove, cook it in the oven, or toss it on the grill. Using the grill is no less healthy than say the stove, its the barbecue sauce that gets you in trouble.

aka23
02-17-2003, 08:15 AM
Microwave cooking helps preserve nutrients by cutting cooking time. When foods are cooked at high temperatures for a long period of time, the greatest vitamin loss occurs, especially with some water-soluble, heat sensitive vitamins like vitamin C and some B vitamins. This is especially true for vegetables. However, studies of meats yield mixed results. Grilling, broiling and microwaving meats generally preserve more nutrients than other cooking methods, such as baking. Also note that some nutrients tend to consistently do better with certain cooking methods, while other nutrients do better with differnt methods. For example microwaving is particularly bad a preserving vitamin B12, but it tends to very well for othe B vitamins.

A good number of people cliam that microwaving is unsafe, damages proteins/amino acids, and increases cancer risk. These types of claims usually have poor evidence and/or distorted evidence. According to the FDA, there is no additional damage to proteins when heated with a microwave rather than conventional oven or stove. In general, microwaves cook food faster and destroy fewer vitamins than conventional cooking methods. There has been a study research that shows a possible loss of human milk's immunologic qualities after microwaving, but more studies are necessary to support this. Microwaving milk may also be a bad idea because valuable components of the milk are destroyed at temperatures greater than 130F.

Wizard
02-17-2003, 08:22 AM
Once again, don't cook any meats in the microwave. It's not all about the protein bv.

aka23
02-17-2003, 09:22 AM
Originally posted by Wizard
Once again, don't cook any meats in the microwave. It's not all about the protein bv.

Your opinion is shared by many persons. However, you did not explain why cooking meats in the microwave should be avoided and aparently it is okay to cook other foods. Why do you feel that people should not cook meat in the microwave?

Wizard
02-17-2003, 09:37 AM
Microwaves don't always cook foods evenly. This means that you can have hot and cold spots in the food. All of the food needs to be hot so that any bacteria present can be killed.

So, you have to arrange, cover, stir and rotate the meal to ensure even cooking. Where possible, cut food into evenly sized pieces so they will cook evenly.

I believe that it's easier to prepare it in the over or in the grill.(but it's better in the oven if you want to have higher bv protein)

body
02-17-2003, 10:27 AM
cooking in microwves is fine for meats.

if cooked properly bacteria is not a problems especially if using the right joints of meat.

aka23
02-17-2003, 10:32 AM
Originally posted by Wizard
Microwaves don't always cook foods evenly. This means that you can have hot and cold spots in the food. All of the food needs to be hot so that any bacteria present can be killed.

So, you have to arrange, cover, stir and rotate the meal to ensure even cooking. Where possible, cut food into evenly sized pieces so they will cook evenly.

I believe that it's easier to prepare it in the over or in the grill.(but it's better in the oven if you want to have higher bv protein)

I agree that microwave cooking presents a greater bacteria risk. In addition to the steps you mentioned other prvention techniques include cooking a lower power level for longer periods, not cooking large pieces of meat (using small pieces instead), take out bones before cooking, use a covered dish trapping steam, confirming temperature with thermometer, not cooking foods with stuffing, adjusting recipes for power levels, and allowing adequate time to stand and complete coooking.

I do not think that cooking all meat is unsafe. I think a person has little risk of bacteria contamination if they are using a single serving of meat only, and cook for a reasonable length of time. I think there is also little risk with larger sizes when some of the safety techniques mentioned in this thread are used.

NotSoBig
02-17-2003, 10:43 AM
aka23, id like to see some scientific facts or studies that support your posts.

Wizard
02-17-2003, 10:43 AM
Right on.

aka23
02-17-2003, 12:59 PM
Originally posted by NotSoBig
aka23, id like to see some scientific facts or studies that support your posts.

The Google cache at http://216.239.57.100/search?q=cache:-YG_tFMdHREC:freepages.writing.rootsweb.com/~jentaylor/CookingVitamins.htm%22&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 closely relates to my posts. Unfortunately this is a medical newsletter, rather than a scientific study. Here is a quote:

"With the exception of vitamin B12, it is safe to say that microwave cooking preserves more vitamins and minerals in foods than other cooking methods simply because it cooks faster and requires adding less water than other conventional methods."

I made a large number of claims in my posts. For which claims did you want references?

restless
02-17-2003, 01:04 PM
Microwaves. (http://www.mercola.com/article/microwave/hazards2.htm)

Microwaves 2. (http://www.mercola.com/article/microwave/hazards.htm)

Wizard
02-17-2003, 01:07 PM
So?

He did not ask about the b12 vit. but we were focused on the bacteria that are not killed after cooking (any meats) in the microwave and we said that you have to follow some certain steps to avoid getting any infections like salmonela etc.

aka23
02-17-2003, 01:24 PM
Originally posted by Wizard
So?

He did not ask about the b12 vit. but we were focused on the bacteria that are not killed after cooking (any meats) in the microwave and we said that you have to follow some certain steps to avoid getting any infections like salmonela etc.

I asked what claims you wanted refernces for to avoid this confusion. In notsobig's first post in this thread he mentioned nutrients being lost in food, so I listed my first refernce to my claims in regards to nutrients being lost in foods. I am guessing you want references for my claim

"I do not think that cooking all meat is unsafe. I think a person has little risk of bacteria contamination if they are using a single serving of meat only, and cook for a reasonable length of time. I think there is also little risk with larger sizes when some of the safety techniques mentioned in this thread are used."

On the page at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/fact_microwave.htm , the Food Safety and Inspection Service says that "it is important to use the following safe microwaving tips to prevent foodborne illness" then lists steps that are very similar to the safety tequniques listed in my post. This implies that when using those techniques the Food Safety and Inspection Service feels that foodborne illnesses from bacteria can be prevented. The page at http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC3586.htm which is based on (USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. Microwave Food Safety. June 1997.) spells it out more explicity saying "Simple techniques ensure that meat and poultry microwave safely." I used the prhase "I think" and "I do not think" in the claims listed above because I was drawing conlcusions.

Saint Patrick
02-17-2003, 01:51 PM
Originally posted by Victor
It's seems that by eating food that are BBQed, deep fried, etc are unhealthy, while food that are steamed, grilled, etc are healthy options.


Since when is BBQ unhealthy?


Anyway, I take a multivitamin and a B-complex, so personally I'm not worried about losing a few vitamins from cooking it on the stove.