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Erbas
03-12-2003, 11:40 AM
does anyone know the breakdown of calories burned at rest? Fat/Carb/Protein? I'm sure it varies for the individual and diet, but is there kind of a "rule of thumb"? Thanks.

GonePostal
03-12-2003, 11:49 AM
The calories you eat.

Erbas
03-12-2003, 12:01 PM
I guess I need to clarify. If you are consuming below maintenance calories. While I'm just sitting there will my body choose fat over glucose, glycogen or protein?

I'm wondering if on days I do not weight train if I could basically consume fewer calories than my normal cut amount and negate carbs totally....not really keto as on training days I'll consume a 40p/35c/25f....basically on non training days I'll just cut the carbs which would drop my caloric intake by 35%....

bradley
03-12-2003, 02:05 PM
Here is one you might want to skim through.
http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=17831&highlight=calorie+cycling



Here are some threads on calorie cycling that might be of interest.

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=27368
http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=10888&highlight=calorie+cycling

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=11936&highlight=calorie+cycling

Erbas
03-12-2003, 02:18 PM
thanks Bradley....I'll scope them out!

aka23
03-12-2003, 03:54 PM
Originally posted by Erbas
does anyone know the breakdown of calories burned at rest? Fat/Carb/Protein? I'm sure it varies for the individual and diet, but is there kind of a "rule of thumb"? Thanks.

Carbs and fats are the primary source of your energy. Carbs can be used as glycogen stored in the muscle cell or glucose circulating in the blood. Fats can be used as fat stored in the muscle cell or fatty acids circulating in the blood. Phosphocreatine may also contribute during short (six seconds or less) of near maximal work. Protein is not usually a major contributor except for special cases, such as starvation or high protein / low carb diets.

A person usually burns the highest percentage of fat when they are at rest. The "average" person burns about 70 percent fat and 30 percent carbs. During activity a smaller percentage of the calories come from fat, but more fat is likely to be burned overall. During anareobic activity (out of breath, can only sustain for short duration), nearly all the fuel is carb, but afterwards fat burning is increased.

Ironman8
03-12-2003, 05:48 PM
Originally posted by aka23
nearly all the fuel is carb, but afterwards fat burning is increased.

After 20 minutes or so (just thought you'd like to know).

Erbas
03-13-2003, 10:12 AM
thanks! Good thread recomendations.

AKA23: Thanks for the info. Question: You wrote:"A person usually burns the highest percentage of fat when they are at rest. The "average" person burns about 70 percent fat and 30 percent carbs."

If a person is not on a "keto" type diet, but does not consume carbs one day, does that 70/30 change for that day? or does a person typically have to do the carb depletion before there is any sort of "metabolic shift"?

aka23
03-13-2003, 12:38 PM
Originally posted by Erbas
AKA23: Thanks for the info. Question: You wrote:"A person usually burns the highest percentage of fat when they are at rest. The "average" person burns about 70 percent fat and 30 percent carbs."

If a person is not on a "keto" type diet, but does not consume carbs one day, does that 70/30 change for that day? or does a person typically have to do the carb depletion before there is any sort of "metabolic shift"?


Note that those pecentages are crude estimates. Many persons burn significantly more or less than the estimates. The percentages are effected by many factors including diet, exercise, body composition, and calorie balance. Changes occur far before total glycogen depletion. Generally when there are fewer carbs available (low carb diet, fasting, starvation, long exercise, etc. ) , the body is more likely to use other sources such as fat and muscle; but there are many exceptions. I think that not consuming any carbs one day is a very bad idea, even though it may increase the percentage of calories burned from fat. There are numerous health concerns associated with this approach, and overall calorie intake is likely have a much greater impact on body composition.