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aggablinky
03-28-2003, 05:45 PM
Hello, i was wondering, if i were to eat a 200gm tin of tuna each day, would this help my muscle recovery? I have 2 drinks per day of protein powder, plus low fat yoghurt, and usuall red or white meat for dinner. Is the tuna a vital assistance? Thankyou

EdgarMex
03-28-2003, 07:41 PM
Tuna is good because it contains plenty of protein. The ones I eat have 20 gr of protein per 130 gr can (drained).

Wolverine
03-28-2003, 08:09 PM
PROTEIN is important, be it tuna, chicken, red meat........

Xg74
03-28-2003, 10:08 PM
Tuna just happens to contain a lot of protein, tastes somewhat good (you can mix it with things, don't have to eat it straight out of the can), and is cheap.

Wolverine
03-28-2003, 10:10 PM
Originally posted by Xg74
cheap. [/B]


ah yes the magic word!

Ironman8
03-28-2003, 11:35 PM
But be careful of eating too much. You can get mercury poisoning.

Vido
03-28-2003, 11:39 PM
Originally posted by Ironman8
But be careful of eating too much. You can get mercury poisoning.

I believe that is only from fresh tuna, but I may be wrong.

AdamGberg
03-29-2003, 12:49 AM
tuna is cheap and effective protein....contains a hand full of amino acids or somethin

restless
03-29-2003, 02:47 AM
You can get mercury poisoning but the cases I heard reported were from poeple eating up to 6 or 7 cans a day. Keep in mind that mercury has a biological half life of around 40 days so you will build high levels of it in blood from large quatities of tuna even if you don't reach the dose necessary for acute poisoning. I only eat it 3 times a week.

Ironman8
03-29-2003, 08:38 AM
Originally posted by AdamGberg
....contains a hand full of amino acids or somethin

Are you talking about Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids?

Ritzol
03-29-2003, 08:58 AM
primarily omega-3.

Shao-LiN
03-29-2003, 09:05 AM
amino acids are building blocks of protein, so I don't think they fit into the classification of omega 3 or 6 fatty acids.

As for mercury poisoning, I know people who eat upwards of 5 cans of tuna a day. It's been a good 2 years for one guy and he isn't dead yet, hehe.

restless
03-29-2003, 09:19 AM
Originally posted by Shao-LiN
amino acids are building blocks of protein, so I don't think they fit into the classification of omega 3 or 6 fatty acids.

As for mercury poisoning, I know people who eat upwards of 5 cans of tuna a day. It's been a good 2 years for one guy and he isn't dead yet, hehe.

Well, I don't think there's any reported case of deaths resulting from acute mercury poisoning trough dietary intake of it, but developing a degenerative nervous system disease like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. The case I was talking about just resulted in loss of hair, muscle mass and other nasty things like this. But hey, if it doesn't kill you then it's ok, right??

restless
03-29-2003, 09:20 AM
And it would be nice to have those persons test their mercury blood levels. You can get a hair tested and it will show up.

aka23
03-29-2003, 01:10 PM
FDA toxicologists found that there are adverse effects of mecury in fish at doses of 10 ppm. They set their limit at 1ppm to have a wide safety margin. There are a couple types of fish that been known to exceed 1ppm mecury such as swordfish and shark. Generally predatory species that consume smaller fish have high levels. Adult tuna fits in this category, but the immature tuna that is used in canned products does not. Canned tuna has been measured to have an average mecury level of 0.17 ppm (would take about 6 cans to reach 1 ppm limit). Some groups feel this level may be harmful to developing brains when eaten on a regular basis, so limits may be placed for special groups like pregnant women and small children.

There are a wide variety of recommendations of acceptable levels for adults. One of the most common figures is no more than 7oz of fish containing 1ppm mecury per week, or no more than 14oz of fish conataining 0.5 mecury per week. Using mathematics, the equivalent weekly serving for canned tuna would be no more than 8.2 six oz. cans (5 oz solid) of tuna per week, or an average of no more than 1.2 cans per day (assuming that one is not eating other fish containing mecury on a regular basis). Note that this figure includes the FDA's wide safety margin, so the vast majority of the population can probably eat more than this amount without adverse effects. Most experts agree that fish is safe and healthy when eaten a few times per week as part of balanced diet.

restless
03-29-2003, 01:36 PM
Yes, I'm aware of all the FDA recommendations regarding this and of the maths involved. The strange thing is there is a steady rise in many diseases like cancer, multiple schlerosis (spelling?) and the others I mentioned and who knows if this kind of toxins are not related to it? Just because you are not aware of the adverse effects doesn't mean there ain't any.

And once again, the FDA guidelines mean nothing to me.

JustinASU
03-30-2003, 09:07 AM
Just when I thought I found a miracle food. :swear: Now I'm gonna become diseased because I eat 3-4 cans a day every now and then.

-Justin

Ironman8
03-30-2003, 09:24 AM
3 or 4 occasionally won't really effect you.

Ritzol
03-30-2003, 11:19 AM
Take any food you want and someone will ALWAYS find something negative about it. Sometimes you have to take things with a grain of salt.

Lesnar_Rocks
03-30-2003, 04:29 PM
I prefer to mix mine with the tuna helper meals, Much yummier and without all the mayonaise

Ironman8
03-30-2003, 06:18 PM
I prefer mine soaked in canola oil. Alot of people think it's disgusting, but I think it's yummy :D

lilpenis
03-31-2003, 07:48 AM
Originally posted by Ironman8
I prefer mine soaked in canola oil. Alot of people think it's disgusting, but I think it's yummy :D

me too.

Also, can you cut on tuna by itself? Like a can of tuna for lunch. Then for dinner another can of tuna?
Is this enough to keep muscle and lose fat?

bradley
03-31-2003, 01:44 PM
Originally posted by lilpenis


me too.

Also, can you cut on tuna by itself? Like a can of tuna for lunch. Then for dinner another can of tuna?
Is this enough to keep muscle and lose fat?

A couple of cans of tuna day would not be enough calories for one thing and you would be deficient in many vitamins and minerals. I would recommend eating slightly below maintenance calories and follow a balanced diet. Somewhere along the lines of 40/30/30 ratio of protein, carbs, and fat. There is a lot of good info on cutting on this forum. Try running a search and you should find lots of helpful info.