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View Full Version : What foods absord water weight?



Scottie Larock
04-06-2003, 04:49 PM
Is veggies good for water absorbing?

bradley
04-06-2003, 04:56 PM
Are you trying to decrease water retention?

If so read this:

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5236&highlight=water+retention

Scottie Larock
04-06-2003, 06:52 PM
Thanks Bradley

Scottie Larock
04-06-2003, 06:53 PM
Great post, I think I'm going to load up on Vit C.

aka23
04-07-2003, 09:41 AM
Originally posted by Scottie Larock
Great post, I think I'm going to load up on Vit C.

The referenced thread recommeded 8-10g of Vitamin C or about 15,000% of the RDA. There are possible negative effects with this level of megadosing. Only a small portion of this much Vitamin C is absorbed. Unabsorbed Vitamin C may lead to watery stools or diarrhea. It also may lead to rebound problems if stopped suddenly and is associated with a number of other problems in persons who are at risk.

Furthermore Vitamin C is rarely recommended for this purpose, as other supplements tend to be more effective. I would recommend avoiding supplements all together for water retention purposes. There are more effective ways to reduce water rentention with fewer side effects, such as reducing sodium/salt intake. I would also suggest exercising (especially vigorous cardio) and drinking a good amount of water (low water intake can lead to water retention).

bradley
04-07-2003, 01:56 PM
There are more effective ways to reduce water rentention with fewer side effects, such as reducing sodium/salt intake. I would also suggest exercising (especially vigorous cardio) and drinking a good amount of water (low water intake can lead to water retention).

Doesn't varying sodium intake cause more problems with water retention than keeping a constant sodium intake? I agree with you in that the best way to reduce water retention is to increase fluid intake.

I ask this after reading the following thread:
http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=16572&highlight=water+retention

As far as the vitamin C goes, I am not keen on taking mega-doses of anything. Although doing this once every now and then probably would not hurt anything. Seems as though I remember one doctor who took 10g of vitamin C a day. Although I cannot remember his name (so it is irrelevant:)).

raniali
04-07-2003, 02:06 PM
his name was linus pauling (the nobel prize winner) and he advocated upwards of 15-20g/day

bradley
04-07-2003, 02:17 PM
Originally posted by raniali
his name was linus pauling (the nobel prize winner) and he advocated upwards of 15-20g/day

Thanks for the info;) I think he passed away now right?

raniali
04-07-2003, 02:34 PM
yeah - he's dead (1994)

if you're interested:

http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/pauling.html
http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/MM/Views/Exhibit/documents/medicine.html

Ironman8
04-07-2003, 03:17 PM
Excuse me, but what other foods have vitamin C except oranges?

bradley
04-07-2003, 04:28 PM
Originally posted by Ironman8
Excuse me, but what other foods have vitamin C except oranges?

http://www.mi4c.org/childhealthresources/nutrition/good_sources_of_vitamin_c.htm


This is just a short list, and I am sure there are many other good sources of vitamin C.


I saw on the news the other day that one of the largest sources of vitamin C in America was from potatoes. Just thought I would throw that in:D

aka23
04-07-2003, 04:36 PM
Originally posted by bradley
Doesn't varying sodium intake cause more problems with water retention than keeping a constant sodium intake? I agree with you in that the best way to reduce water retention is to increase fluid intake.

I was not suggesting varying sodium intake on a day by day basis. I was suggesting making long term dietary changes involving reducing added salt from the diet. Salt is composed of sodium and chloride. Added salt in foods effects electroylte balance and water retention in many persons. Most health experts recommend about 1-3g sodium per day. This is the amount that occurs naturally in foods. However, most Americans eat far more. One recent thread on this forum mentioned that canned chile had 2.5g sodium, more than the entire daily recommended amount. Other canned products and processed foods also have similar amounts. I am not aware on any negative effects of reducing unnatural added salt in foods over the long term. Doing so may reduce water retention, and reduce risk for a number of diseases. It also may reduce temporary water retention associated with meals containing more than the usual level of salt. Reducing added dietary salt is a common recommendation for water retention. I agree that making drastic temporary changes in electrolyte balance is not healthy.



As far as the vitamin C goes, I am not keen on taking mega-doses of anything. Although doing this once every now and then probably would not hurt anything. Seems as though I remember one doctor who took 10g of vitamin C a day. Although I cannot remember his name (so it is irrelevant:)).

I am not saying that everyone who takes 150 times the RDA will run into problems. However, some people will. In some people doses above 1 g/day can cause nausea, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and increase risk of kidney stones. Exess Vitamin C also increase risk of iron overload in certain persons, and reduces availablility of B-12. I think in general there is no need to take this level of any Vitamin or Mineral. The RDA is no doubt too low for optimal functioning, but I think that a megadose like this, which is impossibly too large to get from natural foods is too high.

Also note that many of Linus Pauling's claims about Vitamin C were not accurate, as indicated by the link the raniali provided (http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/pauling.html).

Ritzol
04-07-2003, 08:52 PM
doesn't fiber absorb water?????????

bradley
04-08-2003, 02:42 AM
Originally posted by Ritzol
doesn't fiber absorb water?????????

He is referring more to subcutaneous water retention in which fiber would not really play a role I don't believe. Although fiber can absorb water and swell in the stomach causing you to feel full.