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Danzig
04-08-2003, 11:18 AM
Hello everyone!
I have a question about eating fruit late in the evening.
I use to mix down 1-2 eggs with 1 banana, milk and some raspberrys, maybe 1 hour or so before I go to bed.
Mostly on the days that I've been lifting, but sometimes just as a desert.
Do you guys think that this drink contains to much sugar to be taken late in the evening?
I don't really know about sugar from fruits and sugar from other stuff... fruits contains alot of energy/sugar and when your body gets a load of it wont it stop the burning of fat then?

Berserker
04-08-2003, 11:36 AM
Probably better having fruit earlier in the day. For me it would depend on my bodyfat at the time. If I am bulking or happy with it I wouldn't worry about it.
I've been going wth milk and cottage cheese before bed, takes longer to digest, so spread out.

Vido
04-08-2003, 01:51 PM
I'd try to go with a mix of protein and fats before bed (low GI carbs would also be ok I suppose, but I tend to stay away from them at night). Something like cottage cheese + natty pb, or a few whole eggs should do the trick.

raniali
04-08-2003, 02:35 PM
the question is how long after lifting are u ingesting all this fruit? fructose preferentially fills liver glycogen instead of muscle cells. earlier in the day might be a bit better, as stated.

ElPietro
04-08-2003, 02:39 PM
I'm not sure if it goes towards blood glycogen at all even, and has fewer steps at being stored as fat than other sugars. So eating fruits can be bad if you are not already in a carb depleted state from some form of activity, and not very effective at restoring glucose levels if that is your goal.

aka23
04-08-2003, 04:00 PM
Originally posted by ElPietro
I'm not sure if it goes towards blood glycogen at all even, and has fewer steps at being stored as fat than other sugars. So eating fruits can be bad if you are not already in a carb depleted state from some form of activity, and not very effective at restoring glucose levels if that is your goal.

I think you are confusing fruit with fructose. Fruit contains glucose as well as fructose. Bananas, cherries, grapes, oranges, and several other common fruits contain more glucose than fructose, bananas by a good margin. This glucose acts similar to glucose in other foods and increases muscle gylcogen and blood sugar.

You may have meant to say muscle glycogen, rather than blood glycogen. Fructose does not increase muscle glycogen in a direct way, but it does raise blood sugar levels as well as liver glycogen levels. It raises blood sugar at a slower rate than glucose. This decreases the chances of an insulin spike and the assoicated negative effects.

Also note that increasing liver glycogen levels is very unlikely to result in fat storage unless it is full to capacity. A piece of fruit is unlikely to do this unless you are in a caloric surplus or other special conditions that would result in high glycogen levels. Fructose does not increase blood tryglyceride (fat) levels unless it is taken in large quantities, so that the liver gylcogen overflows. In the interview on this site, Lyle Mcdonald says negative effects of fructose begin at 50-60 grams per day. Most authorities set much higher limits. 50g of fructose is more than 13 bananas per day day (or more than 7 if you split the sucrose in two and add to fructose). The studies which I am aware of that found increased tryglycerides involved ~20% of calories from concentrated fructose (not fruit).

This does not mean than fructose is more likely to increase body fat than other sugers. Some nutritionists think that fructose is less likely to result in increased body fat than other types of sugar because it causes less of an insulin response.

Answering the orginal poster's questions, I do not think there is anything wrong with eating a banana near bedtime. The body burns calories in a similar way during the night and during the day. The body usually burns about 70% of its calories from fat during rest, but this amounts to only a small amount of total calories since calories are burned at a slow rate, in some cases as low as 60 calories/hr. The fat burning may increase a small amount if glycogen stores are low (like during other times during the day), but I think it is beneficial to not let glycogen stores get very low except during special situations. Doing so may interfere with recovery.

Danzig
04-09-2003, 02:00 PM
thanks alot guys!