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CBates
04-10-2003, 08:59 AM
Is canned salmon a good source of omega 3's? I know salmon is, but since it's in a can and looks kind of weird when taking it out of the can, I'm not sure if it goes through any kind of process that may degenerate the quality of fats in it. Each serving has 5 grams of fat, I usually eat about 5 servings a day of it, but I honestly don't want to if it's not a good source of omega 3's.

Paul Stagg
04-10-2003, 09:48 AM
AFAIK, Salmon is salmon.

Unless it isn't.

Berserker
04-10-2003, 10:22 AM
5 servings is alot. Theres been articles about limiting your intake of fish cause of mercury. I don't really worry about it. But five servings is alot. Need a little variety.

aka23
04-10-2003, 12:05 PM
Originally posted by CBates
Is canned salmon a good source of omega 3's? I know salmon is, but since it's in a can and looks kind of weird when taking it out of the can, I'm not sure if it goes through any kind of process that may degenerate the quality of fats in it. Each serving has 5 grams of fat, I usually eat about 5 servings a day of it, but I honestly don't want to if it's not a good source of omega 3's.

Salmon is an excellent source of Omega 3's. Here are the amounts in a 6oz serving from various sources according to the USDA database. Note that although farmed salmon has higher levels, wild salmon (like the type in most canned products) is superior because a larger portion of the fat is Omega 3.

Salmon, Atlantic, farmed -- 3.6 grams
Salmon, pink, canned, solids with bone and liquid -- 2.8 grams
Salmon, sockeye, canned, drained solids with bone -- 2.0 grams
Salmon, Coho, farmed -- 2.2 grams
Salmon, Coho, wild -- 1.8 grams

body
04-10-2003, 12:05 PM
paul is correct, its still salmon and the omega 3 levels should be fine.

aka23
04-10-2003, 12:07 PM
Originally posted by Berserker
5 servings is alot. Theres been articles about limiting your intake of fish cause of mercury. I don't really worry about it. But five servings is alot. Need a little variety.

Canned salmon has little mecury. The page at http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~frf/sea-mehg.html indicates the average mecury content is ND (not detectable).

restless
04-10-2003, 12:16 PM
And we all know that the FDA has no links to or worries about the food industry profits....

Just messing with you.....

Seriously, variety is important for many reasons these days.

restless
04-10-2003, 12:26 PM
FDA reviewed mercury recomendations? (http://www.mercola.com/2003/apr/9/mercury_levels.htm)

aka23
04-10-2003, 12:36 PM
Originally posted by restless
And we all know that the FDA has no links to or worries about the food industry profits....

The mecury content in salmon has been measured by several authorities besides the FDA. There is little doubt that it has far less mecury than many other types of fish. EPA studies of mecury found similar results. They found 0.035 mcg/g in salmon (the FDA's page seems to have a detectable limit at about .04mcg/.g), 0.206 mcg/g in tuna (6x more), and 1 mcg/g in swordfish (29x more). Austrialian standards set limits at about 200 6oz servings of canned salmon per week for the general population, 22 6oz servings of canned tuna per week, or 7 6oz servings of certain other fish. I agree that variety is important, regardless of mecury content.

restless
04-10-2003, 02:39 PM
Like I said, just messing with you Aka.


On a related note, here's a discussion we're having about tuna and mercury in fish at the HST forum:

Thread (http://www.hypertrophy-specific.com/cgi-bin/ib3/ikonboard.cgi?;act=ST;f=12;t=230;st=20)