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View Full Version : Starting my first serious diet, looking for advice.



soko
04-22-2003, 06:35 PM
What are some must have foods in any good fitness/bodybuilding diet? I am looking for something pretty balanced with enough calories and other good stuff to help me put on muscle and burn away fat. What foods are good on a daily basis, weekly basis, etc? Thanks alot.

Ah yeah, and what about a good after-workout drink? Anyone know a good recepie, or drink?

Ironman8
04-22-2003, 07:00 PM
Well, foods with alot of protein is essential for bodybuilding. Also, healthy fats like fish oil supplements, flax, peanuts, olive oil, etc.

A good post-workout drink would be a protein shake mixed with some high-GI carbs. Like dextrose.

What does your diet look like right now? Post it and maybe we can see if it need changes or not. BTW, welcome to the board!

soko
04-22-2003, 07:08 PM
Ah, my diet is pretty weak right now. I usually have one or two peices of fruit and a bowl of cherrios with 2% milk for breakfast, lunch is usually something small like a small pizza thing (pita bread, pizza sauce, mozzarella cheese) and a bagel or maybe a sandwich, I usually have eggs once a week or so, and sometimes I just dont even eat dinner. but when I do it's usually something really small. I really dont get that much in my diet.. hence the revamp :)

GhettoSmurf
04-22-2003, 07:34 PM
Protein- Lean Red Meat, Chicken, Turkey, Tuna, Eggs, Cottage Cheese, Milk, etc.

Complex Carbs- Oats, Brown Rice, Whole-Wheat Bread, Whole-Wheat Pasta, Sweet Potatoes/Yams

Simple Carbs- Apples, Pears (other LOW-GI fruit)

Fats- Flaxseed Oil, NATURAL Peanut Butter, etc.

Post-Workout- Whey, Dextrose and/or Maltodextrine


and BANG! your all set ;)

Ironman8
04-22-2003, 07:41 PM
Heh, ok, first start with calories. First take in 2,500 calories and if you don't lose weight, reduce it little by little until you lose weight. Try to lose 1 pound a week, becuase if you lose more than that, it's probably muscle.

Try eating 6 small meals a day, spread out 2 or 3 hours apart. Your protein intake should be per Ib. weight. So, let's say you weigh 180Ibs., eat 180grams of protein.

Most of you calories should come from protein. Your protein intake should be per Ib. weight. So, let's say you weigh 180Ibs., eat 180grams of protein. Your carbs should come from low-gi complex carbs (like wheat bread, veggies, fruit, anything that comes from the ground.)

Most of you fat should come from healthy sources(like I stated on my above post).

A good cutting macronutrient breakdown is a 40(p)/40(f)/30(c). So 40% of your cals should come from protein, 40% from fat, and 30% from carbs. A good place to keep track of these would be fitday.com.

Well, I hoped I helped some. Post any other questions you have :)

soko
04-22-2003, 07:47 PM
Wow, great link, thanks. What about supplements? Are they worth it, or should I be getting everything from my diet, that I shouldn't even worry about?

Ironman8
04-22-2003, 07:54 PM
Ya, supplements are great. Taking fish oil and flax supplements are a good way for getting Omega-3 and Omega-6 healthy fatty acids in your diet (which is lacking in most American's diets).

GhettoSmurf
04-22-2003, 07:54 PM
it wouldnt hurt to get your hands on some whey protein, mainly for post-workout. IMO

soko
04-22-2003, 08:09 PM
Great! Thanks alot, both of you... One last question, you might know the answer. On pork rinds, the Nutrition Information says they have about 9 grams of protein per serving, yet it says its not a significant source of protein. Is that because they are low quality proteins from baking the rinds are such high temperatures? How exactly does that work, and what makes something significant?

bradley
04-23-2003, 02:35 AM
Originally posted by Ironman8
Heh, ok, first start with calories. First take in 2,500 calories and if you don't lose weight, reduce it little by little until you lose weight. Try to lose 1 pound a week, becuase if you lose more than that, it's probably muscle.

Most of you calories should come from protein. Your protein intake should be per Ib. weight. So, let's say you weigh 180Ibs., eat 180grams of protein. Your carbs should come from low-gi complex carbs (like wheat bread, veggies, fruit, anything that comes from the ground.)

Most of you fat should come from healthy sources(like I stated on my above post).


Well, I hoped I helped some. Post any other questions you have :)

How did you come up with 2,500 calories. I agree in that you should lower cals up or down in small increments but 2500 cals could be too much or too little depending on the size of the person, metabolism, activity level, etc. I would recommend cleaning up your diet and then adjust cals in small increments each week until you are losing approx. 1lb per week. For example if you are taking in 2300 cals right now and maintaining your weight then maybe drop down to 2200 cals and see what kind of results you get, and if you are currently eating 2800 cals and maintaining your weight then drop cals to say 2600. You have to remember that if you are just starting training then you will need some calories for muscle recovery and repair.


A good cutting macronutrient breakdown is a 40(p)/40(f)/30(c). So 40% of your cals should come from protein, 40% from fat, and 30% from carbs. A good place to keep track of these would be fitday.com.

That comes out to 110%. I would say something more along the lines of 40p/30c/30f, but the ratios are really not that important as long as you are getting 1g or protein per lb. of bodyweight and getting adequate amounts of healthy fats.


Ya, supplements are great. Taking fish oil and flax supplements are a good way for getting Omega-3 and Omega-6 healthy fatty acids in your diet (which is lacking in most American's diets).

Fish and flax oil contain a significant amount of omega 3 fats but not omega 6. Most individuals consume enough omega 6 fats through their diet. If you are going to supplement your diet with healthy fats then I would recommend fish oil over flax oil.

bradley
04-23-2003, 02:46 AM
Originally posted by soko
Great! Thanks alot, both of you... One last question, you might know the answer. On pork rinds, the Nutrition Information says they have about 9 grams of protein per serving, yet it says its not a significant source of protein. Is that because they are low quality proteins from baking the rinds are such high temperatures? How exactly does that work, and what makes something significant?

Look at the other macros. I am not positive but pork rinds are just fried skin right? I am sure they contain a large amount of fat compared to each gram of protein, so I would look for a better source of protein.

Stick to getting your protein for more lean sources like eggs, lean beef, chicken, dairy products, and fish.

bradley
04-23-2003, 02:48 AM
Originally posted by GhettoSmurf
Simple Carbs- Apples, Pears (other LOW-GI fruit)


Fruit is a complex carb as well. A simple carb would be something like dextrose, sucrose, fructose, etc.

bradley
04-23-2003, 02:53 AM
Originally posted by soko
Ah, my diet is pretty weak right now. I usually have one or two peices of fruit and a bowl of cherrios with 2% milk for breakfast, lunch is usually something small like a small pizza thing (pita bread, pizza sauce, mozzarella cheese) and a bagel or maybe a sandwich, I usually have eggs once a week or so, and sometimes I just dont even eat dinner. but when I do it's usually something really small. I really dont get that much in my diet.. hence the revamp :)

Try to get some protein in with each meal, along with some carbs, and a little bit of fat. For example for breakfast you might go with something like a couple of eggs and some oats. Then 2-3 hours later have another small meal.

Just divide your calories and protein somewhat evenly over these meals and you are set. Planning and preparing food in advance will go a long way when trying to get your diet in order.

bradley
04-23-2003, 03:00 AM
Here are some threads that have some common bodybuilding foods listed:

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=16653&highlight=grocery+list

http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=26368&highlight=grocery+list

GhettoSmurf
04-23-2003, 04:55 AM
Originally posted by bradley


Fruit is a complex carb as well. A simple carb would be something like dextrose, sucrose, fructose, etc.

yeah, sorry about that, i was thinking of the sugar (fructose) that is in the fruit.




GJ at ripping the thread apart bradley ;)

soko
04-23-2003, 05:31 AM
Originally posted by bradley


Look at the other macros. I am not positive but pork rinds are just fried skin right? I am sure they contain a large amount of fat compared to each gram of protein, so I would look for a better source of protein.

Stick to getting your protein for more lean sources like eggs, lean beef, chicken, dairy products, and fish.

Yes, they are just fried skin. I was just curious as to why 9 grams of protein isnt considered significant?

unshift
04-23-2003, 07:14 AM
Originally posted by soko


Yes, they are just fried skin. I was just curious as to why 9 grams of protein isnt considered significant?

let's say you weigh 180lbs, and therefore require 1 g protein/lb body weight = 180 g protein.

it would take you 20 pork rinds to get that amount, and i'm sure you wouldn't want to do that considering the fat involved (tip: stay away from anything thats fried if you're trying to lose weight)

instead go for a high protein source such as chicken or beef, i'm not sure how much they have but its probably 25-30g and much better for you

good luck!

Ironman8
04-23-2003, 10:57 AM
Originally posted by GhettoSmurf
GJ at ripping the thread apart bradley ;)

And embarassing us :D

raniali
04-23-2003, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by Ironman8


And embarassing us :D


actually - people do that quite well on their own

Fenbay
04-23-2003, 12:28 PM
And confusing us ....

Fruit is a complex carb? I thought it was full of simple sugars? Is this a universal statement for fruit?

I've been staying away from fruit for that very reason or else I'd start eating a serving or two at breakfast.

sweet-physique
04-23-2003, 12:36 PM
GJ at ripping the thread apart bradley ;) [/B][/QUOTE]


Bradley knows his stuff when it comes to diet.

BTW I love that second grocery list thread, whoever thought of that is pure genius ;):D

Ironman8
04-23-2003, 12:54 PM
Originally posted by Fenbay
And confusing us ....

Fruit is a complex carb? I thought it was full of simple sugars? Is this a universal statement for fruit?

I've been staying away from fruit for that very reason or else I'd start eating a serving or two at breakfast.

Most fruit have fructose in them, which is a simple sugar. They aren't filled with them though. Most of the sugar is fruit sugar, which is natural, which has a minimal effect on your insulin.

Research shows that 60-70g grams of fructose is when the problems start happening. This is about 20 bananas. So, go ahead and eat fruit, but don't go overboard.

aka23
04-23-2003, 01:06 PM
Originally posted by Fenbay
And confusing us ....

Fruit is a complex carb? I thought it was full of simple sugars? Is this a universal statement for fruit?

I've been staying away from fruit for that very reason or else I'd start eating a serving or two at breakfast.

Carbohydrates are a macronutrient, like protiens and fat. Carbohydrates are further divided into simple and complex based on their chemical structure. Simple carbs have simple chemical structures called monosaccharides and and disaccharides. These include simple sugars like glucose, sucrose, lactose and fructose. Complex carbohydrates have more complex chemical structures called polysaccharides. These include things like starch, glycogen, and cellulose (fiber).

Fruits contain a mixture of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. The amounts of protein and fat are often insignificant. The carbohydrates in the fruit are a mixture of simple and complex. The majority of the calories in fruit usually come from simple carbohydrates. There are exceptions, such as an unripe banana in which most of the calories come from complex carbohydrates, or an avacado in which most of the calories come from fat.

bradley
04-23-2003, 02:28 PM
To add to what Aka23 stated. I think the largest amount of confusion is determing between what is low GI and high GI. Just because something is low GI does not necessarily mean that it is automatically considered a complex carb, and something that is high GI is not always considered a simple carb. For example, maltodextrin is a complex carb but is also high GI, and lactose is a simple sugar but not a high GI carb.