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View Full Version : Low GI foods...does it matter?



johnny123
05-27-2003, 12:19 PM
lets say its decided that an individual eats 2000 cals per day, and loses 1-2 lbs a week, and eats food that is medium high GI carbs.

then lets say same person eats the same amount of cals, but eats all low GI foods.

what would be the difference if thermodynamically the cals were the same? i know insulin would be a factor, but if the cals are the same, would the rate of fat loss be greater?

GhettoSmurf
05-27-2003, 12:56 PM
IMO, i DO believe the fat loss would be greater (depending on how high of GI carbs compaired to how low of GI carbs. I doubt it would be a huge difference, but i personally believe there would be a difference.

bradley
05-27-2003, 02:19 PM
Originally posted by johnny123
lets say its decided that an individual eats 2000 cals per day, and loses 1-2 lbs a week, and eats food that is medium high GI carbs.

then lets say same person eats the same amount of cals, but eats all low GI foods.

what would be the difference if thermodynamically the cals were the same? i know insulin would be a factor, but if the cals are the same, would the rate of fat loss be greater?

I don't think there would be a measurable difference. The person eating the high GI carbs would probably have trouble controlling their appetite which could lead to them eating more calories.

This kind of goes back to the whole getting ripped off of table sugar argument.:)

bradley
05-27-2003, 02:25 PM
Originally posted by GhettoSmurf
IMO, i DO believe the fat loss would be greater (depending on how high of GI carbs compaired to how low of GI carbs. I doubt it would be a huge difference, but i personally believe there would be a difference.

Well we know that high GI carbs cause an insulin spike and then a subsequent crash. Low GI carbs cause more constant blood sugar levels. Agreed?

Well since insulin spikes and then crashes this would cause free fatty acids to be released from the cell faster than say with low GI carbs. Although the ups and downs of insulin would cause the individual to experience hunger which would make it not worth it.

I was reading this in another thread and just though I would throw it out.

Ironman8
05-27-2003, 05:57 PM
Also, doesn't your metabolism switch to burning fat to burning carbs when having an insulin spike? I don't know if you're implying that Bradley.

ChuckieT
05-27-2003, 07:35 PM
Originally posted by Ironman8
Also, doesn't your metabolism switch to burning fat to burning carbs when having an insulin spike? I don't know if you're implying that Bradley.

Is this true? I was under the impression that consuming carbs period would switch you from fat burning to carb burning, low/high GI or not.

In regards to the main question of this thread, maybe there won't be a difference in fat loss, but I think in terms of someone's health, constantly spiking insulin can be detrimental to their long-term health.

GhettoSmurf
05-27-2003, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by Ironman8
Also, doesn't your metabolism switch to burning fat to burning carbs when having an insulin spike? I don't know if you're implying that Bradley.

ive never heard of this... do you have a source of the info?

Ironman8
05-27-2003, 07:52 PM
http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&postid=495198#post495198

Go to the bottom.

bradley
05-28-2003, 03:04 AM
Originally posted by Ironman8
Also, doesn't your metabolism switch to burning fat to burning carbs when having an insulin spike? I don't know if you're implying that Bradley.

This is what I posted in the thread Ironman8 posted a link to:


Well insulin is a lipogenic hormone (fat storing hormone) and also an anti-lipolytic hormone which means it shifts your metabolism away from using fat for energy to using glucose for energy.

I think what he meant is that doesn't your metabolism switch from burning fat to burning carbs when insulin is present?:confused:

bradley
05-28-2003, 03:08 AM
Originally posted by ChuckieT
In regards to the main question of this thread, maybe there won't be a difference in fat loss, but I think in terms of someone's health, constantly spiking insulin can be detrimental to their long-term health.

I agree in that it is probably not a good idea to spike insulin levels all the time. I just threw that out there for hypothetical purposes;)