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Scott S
06-07-2003, 03:41 PM
Does anybody else eat this?

A can supplies me with 84g protein, 35g fat. Are these good fats though?

It's also low in mercury and a good source of omega-3s, from what I read.

SquareHead
06-07-2003, 03:43 PM
Omega 3's are healthy fats. Ive never personally had caned salmon though.

MrWebb78
06-07-2003, 03:51 PM
if you can tolerate the taste just about everything in it is good for ya

SquareHead
06-07-2003, 03:54 PM
Webb is it just that you don't like the canned flavor or the taste of salmon all together. I have never tired the stuff and I guess that would make it easier.

MrWebb78
06-07-2003, 03:58 PM
i love grilling salmon filets, but the canned stuff is down right nasty, its kinda like just ground up fish parts...with the skin too. i remember opening a can, looking at the can of mush, and then trying a bite, and throwing up in my sink.

never again i said lol.

raniali
06-07-2003, 04:06 PM
how does canned salmon contain any less mercury than regular salmon?

and i agree with webbie( much to my dismay) - canned salmon is pretty knarly.

bradley
06-07-2003, 04:27 PM
Originally posted by raniali
how does canned salmon contain any less mercury than regular salmon?


Could depend on if you are referring to farm raised or wild salmon.

SquareHead
06-07-2003, 04:30 PM
Bradley does the far raised salmon not carry some of the properties of the wild fish? I think that I may have read something like this somewhere.

MrWebb78
06-07-2003, 04:34 PM
Originally posted by raniali
how does canned salmon contain any less mercury than regular salmon?

and i agree with webbie( much to my dismay) - canned salmon is pretty knarly.

i dont understand how anyone can disagree with this....*flex*

raniali
06-07-2003, 04:35 PM
Originally posted by bradley


Could depend on if you are referring to farm raised or wild salmon.

i understand THAT difference ... but not the difference between canned and fresh.

farmed and wild can both be found in either form. they usually can the less desirable pieces, in general.

bradley
06-07-2003, 04:50 PM
Originally posted by SquareHead
Bradley does the far raised salmon not carry some of the properties of the wild fish? I think that I may have read something like this somewhere.

The farm raised salmon contains more fat but less omega 3's than that of wild salmon (the farm raised contains more saturated fat). There are other differences but that is the most notable. Wild salmon could contain more pollutants but then again pesticides and other substances are used in farm raised salmon.

One thing that is interesting is that farm raised salmon are fed dyed feed so as to improve the color of the meat. If they were not fed this dyed feed the meat would be a grayish color.

bradley
06-07-2003, 04:58 PM
Originally posted by raniali


i understand THAT difference ... but not the difference between canned and fresh.

farmed and wild can both be found in either form. they usually can the less desirable pieces, in general.

When canning some of the solids and bone are mixed in with the salmon meat, where as when you are eating a salmon filet you would discard these parts of the salmon. Here is an example:

canned salmon (3oz. serving):

Energy kcal 118.150
Energy kj 494.700
Protein g 16.813
Total lipid (fat) g 5.143
Ash g 1.173
Carbohydrate, by difference g 0.000
Fiber, total dietary g 0.000
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 181.050

cooked salmon (3oz.)

Energy kcal 126.650
Energy kj 529.550
Protein g 21.726
Total lipid (fat) g 3.757
Ash g 1.326
Carbohydrate, by difference g 0.000
Fiber, total dietary g 0.000
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 14.450

Notice the difference in the calcium content between the two. This would be due to the ground up bones in the canned salmon:D

Scott S
06-07-2003, 05:07 PM
Here's how I understand the fat difference: farm-raised salmon is fed corn, which raises the level of omega-6s in proportion to omega-3s. Wild salmon (which I assume is what I'm getting in the can) I guess eats more green stuff. It's the same way with cattle: cows that graze primarily have more omega-3s than cows that are strictly corn-fed.

I'm not sure how I'm able to eat it, but it's good for me, so I'm going to run with it.

Thanks folks.

SquareHead
06-07-2003, 05:16 PM
Humm strange. See I never knew any of this. Now I kind of wonder which I get wild or farm. You think the guy at the meat counter would look at me like a nut or just make something up off his head or would they know which they have in their store.

bradley
06-08-2003, 04:11 AM
Originally posted by SquareHead
Humm strange. See I never knew any of this. Now I kind of wonder which I get wild or farm. You think the guy at the meat counter would look at me like a nut or just make something up off his head or would they know which they have in their store.

Most supermarkets will have both wild and farm raised. At the supermarket I shop at it is cleary marked which salmon is farm raised and which is wild. I am sure that if you ask him he will know which type he has.

Black Ice 72
06-08-2003, 12:19 PM
Salmon = the best
Canned salmon = rotten :)

manowar669
06-08-2003, 06:36 PM
If you can't stand the canned taste, rinse it in water. I do this with tuna also, if not in a hurry. I like sardines and sushi too, so maybe I'll just eat anything.

Scott S
06-08-2003, 08:05 PM
Agreed, mano. Draining is a MUST, even for me. It took me a little longer than usual to reach the bottom of yesterday's can, so maybe I'll try rinsing it as well.

AJ_11
06-09-2003, 06:04 AM
Wussies, man I love canned salmon. Although I prefer to eat the grilled stuff but sometimes its too expensive. I have have that most frozen salmon that is sold in grocery stores is chum. Canned stuff is pink(more o-3) at half the price of a serving.

body
06-09-2003, 02:00 PM
Originally posted by bradley


When canning some of the solids and bone are mixed in with the salmon meat, where as when you are eating a salmon filet you would discard these parts of the salmon. Here is an example:

canned salmon (3oz. serving):

Energy kcal 118.150
Energy kj 494.700
Protein g 16.813
Total lipid (fat) g 5.143
Ash g 1.173
Carbohydrate, by difference g 0.000
Fiber, total dietary g 0.000
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 181.050

cooked salmon (3oz.)

Energy kcal 126.650
Energy kj 529.550
Protein g 21.726
Total lipid (fat) g 3.757
Ash g 1.326
Carbohydrate, by difference g 0.000
Fiber, total dietary g 0.000
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 14.450

Notice the difference in the calcium content between the two. This would be due to the ground up bones in the canned salmon:D

but how much of the calcuim is avialable in the bones? some of the bones will not get dissolved and pas straight out of the bum.

plus you can still take out the bones of canned salmon, just takes effort.
aslo there are difference between prot and fat contents on this. the canned has higher protein but lower fat than the fresh.
this could be seasonal varaitions in the salmon.

what form is the mercury in? some mecury compounds are far worse than others.

bradley
06-09-2003, 02:25 PM
Originally posted by body


but how much of the calcuim is avialable in the bones? some of the bones will not get dissolved and pas straight out of the bum.


I am not sure and I was just pointing it out because I found it interesting. I personally do not eat salmon for the calcium content. This was just one difference that I found between canned salmon and salmon filets, which was Raniali's question.



plus you can still take out the bones of canned salmon, just takes effort.

Agreed



aslo there are difference between prot and fat contents on this. the canned has higher protein but lower fat than the fresh.
this could be seasonal varaitions in the salmon.


I agree and that is a good point, but it also could be due to the fact that canned salmon contains the "solids" that filets do not.



what form is the mercury in? some mecury compounds are far worse than others. [/B]

I never mentioned mercury in any of my posts. I did point out that wild salmon could contain pollutants but I also mentioned that farm raised salmon are sometimes exposed to pesticides. Which is basically a trade off IMO. I am not positive but I do not think salmon is one of the fish that contains high levels of mercury.

body
06-09-2003, 02:30 PM
canned salmon unlike tuna.

canned salmon is like 99% salmon and they add a bit of salt. tuna they add brine to it before canning.

but the liquid in the tin is 100% salmon Juice. yum yum. so that a difference between salmon and tuna.

bradely - my final comment on mecruty was more the fact it was in the 1st post on the topic.
But on the availability of the calcuim, i think its quite tightly bound into the bones. so if some one is eating it for salmon it may not be a good source as people think it is. But i may have this wrong.

raniali
06-09-2003, 02:33 PM
all fish at the top of the food chain (shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish - with lesser (but still high) amounts in tuna, sea bass, halibut, marlin, pike and white croaker) contain higher mercury levels. it comes with the territory of eating everything else under you.

however - taken from an article:
"A weekly intake of two to four servings of fish from a variety of species, with special emphasis on fatty fish with low mercury content such as salmon and small oceanic fish is consistent with current advice for reducing cardiovascular risk."