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Ace
06-11-2003, 07:55 AM
Since protein is broken down into amino acids, why couldn't one simply intake AAs and skip the time it takes for the protein to break down?

GhettoSmurf
06-11-2003, 08:33 AM
doesnt the protein provide the calories though? (ie. energy) and not the amino acids?

Ace
06-11-2003, 08:36 AM
Yes, protein provides kcals, but assuming that you get your cals from the usual energy sources likes carbs, wouldn't it not matter?

bradley
06-11-2003, 09:36 AM
Originally posted by Ace
Since protein is broken down into amino acids, why couldn't one simply intake AAs and skip the time it takes for the protein to break down?

There is no reason why you could not, but it really would not be feasible to do so. Another thing that comes to mind is that when the liver is flooded with aminos very quickly, which occurs when absorbing whey protein, the excess amino acids will be oxidized by the liver. When consuming slower digesting proteins, such as animal proteins this sudden rush does not occur.

I am sure if you took X amount of EAAs every so often you could get by, but I really do not see any benefit that it could offer. The time it takes for protein to break down is really a benefit more than a drawback.

bradley
06-11-2003, 09:41 AM
Originally posted by GhettoSmurf
doesnt the protein provide the calories though? (ie. energy) and not the amino acids?

Protein is made up of amino acids, and the proteins that you eat are broken down into amino acids in the body before being absorbed in the small intestine. Before proteins can be used for energy by the body they must be broken down into amino acids.

Ace
06-11-2003, 09:49 AM
I didn't know if there was any benefit or not to the quick time it would take to absorb AAs rather than taking protein other than maybe post workout.

It was more of a good discussion piece than anything. ;)

BobbyRS
06-11-2003, 10:02 AM
Since protein is broken down into amino acids, why couldn't one simply intake AAs and skip the time it takes for the protein to break down?

Interesting question!

Did you know that pigs do not need protein at all?


Pigs in fact do not specifically need protein, but rather require amino acids for the formation of muscle and other body proteins.

http://ohioline.osu.edu/b869/b869_11.html

Anyway.....

Amino Acids are the building blocks of protein. They act as fuel for the body. The liver manufactures about 80% of these amino acids, but the remaining 20% of such amino acids must be supplied directly by diet, and these amino acids are referred to as the essential amino acids. Of the 28 amino acids known to exist, eight of them are considered essential, defined as those that can be obtained only through food. These essential amino acids are:

tryptophan, lysine, methionine, phenylalaine, threonine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine.

The non-essential amino acids include:

arginine, tyrosine, glycine, serine, glutmamic acid, aspartic acid, taurine, cycstine, histidine, proline, alanine, and creatine, which is a combination of arginine, glycine, and methionine.

Proteins are chains of amino acids linked together, bound together with peptide bonds. The protein used in making up the body is not directly derived from diet, but the dietary protein is broken down into amino acids, and the body then re-constitutes these amino acids into the specific proteins needed. Our bodies will only make protein as long as there are sufficient levels of all the necessary amino acids available. If one amino acid is deficient, the body will break down muscle tissue to get the amino acids needed or, the body will use the protein stored in the muscles causing you to lose energy.

Different foods contain different proteins, each with their own unique amino acid composition. The proportions of essential amino acids in foods may differ from the proportions needed by the body to make proteins. The proportion of each of the essential amino acids in foods containing protein determines the quality of that protein. Dietary proteins with all the essential amino acids in the proportions required by the body are said to be a high quality protein.

To answer your question, I couldn't imagine supplementing just amino acids to compensate for getting all of the essential amino acids needed. Quality protein is the best way to supply the multiple amounts of essential amino acids needed by the body.

bradley
06-11-2003, 10:13 AM
Originally posted by BobbyRS

Of the 28 amino acids known to exist, eight of them are considered essential, defined as those that can be obtained only through food. These essential amino acids are:

tryptophan, lysine, methionine, phenylalaine, threonine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine.



You could also include arginine and histidine as EAAs because they are essential during growth.