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Mic Soloist
06-14-2003, 11:19 PM
Since I began to bodybuild in late January I have reached every goal I have went after except for one. I have wanted nothing more than to get under 10% BF, really about 8. I have followed my diet pretty strict, with no more than 1 cheat day per week, and my cheat day is not at all bad. Maybe a piece of cake or a few beers or something.

I have made threads about shedding body fat before and I got advice to eat more. So I've been eating more. My diet now puts me at around 1800 calories a day. All I eat is chicken, natty pnut butter, Tuna, protein shakes, veggies, and other healthy food. I try to get at least a gram of protein for every pound per day. I usually meet my goal.

Since I've been eating more for the last few weeks I have gained weight, and some size on my arms and chest. That is great, but my waist is growing as well and there is no doubt my BF has increased. I feel bigger and I feel flabby. I am probably about 12-14% right now and I was probably 11% b4. I know I can get back to where I was with no problem, however even when I was doing tons of cardio and probably overtraining I still wasn't losing that last bit of weight. I get to a point and I just can't knock off any more weight no matter what I do.

People here told me my matabalism was to slow. I've increased my food and now I eat every 2 or 3 hours. All that has happened is BF% gain.

I am frustrated. What should I do?


-peace-

GonePostal
06-14-2003, 11:39 PM
@5'11 and 160 lb... you need to keep gaining mass... I am about 5'8 @160 and I still think I am skinny... and I'm around 10% Don't worry about the fat :) worry about the mass

GonePostal
06-14-2003, 11:41 PM
Just my own personal opinion though... your goals are your goals though.

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 12:04 AM
My goal is to grow but I would rather be smaller with low BF% than bigger with a belly. My belly has began to push out a lot farther than I can tolerate. I have been gaining a lot of mass. I've went from 154 to 162 in about a month. But I need to get under 10%


-peace-

Saint Patrick
06-15-2003, 03:14 AM
How much cardio are you doing? Maybe increase cardio. 1800 cals is a good amount to be eating for someone your size who is trying to cut.

GhettoSmurf
06-15-2003, 05:40 AM
you need to remember bro, it is darn near impossible to gain mass and lose BF%.

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 08:56 AM
Originally posted by Saint Patrick
How much cardio are you doing? Maybe increase cardio. 1800 cals is a good amount to be eating for someone your size who is trying to cut.

I was actually gaining on 1800 though. I was gaining a lot, quick. I have been blessed with a middle age matabalism at 20:(


-peace-

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 08:57 AM
Originally posted by Saint Patrick
How much cardio are you doing?


I've slacked off a little in the last week but usually I play organized bball at least 3-4 times per week and run on the eliptical machine for 20 minutes 2-3 times per week. So quite a bit.


-peace-

bradley
06-15-2003, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by Mic Soloist
I was actually gaining on 1800 though. I was gaining a lot, quick. I have been blessed with a middle age matabalism at 20:(


Well if you were gaining on 1800 cals per day then you were obviously over maintenance, and to lose weight you need to be under maintenance cals. You can post your diet again so we can take a look at it.

Also just because you are cutting does not mean that you have to do large amounts of cardio. When attempting to lose weight I think it is best to adjust one thing at a time, either diet or cardio. Cutting cals and increasing cardio is a good way to lose LBM.

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 11:37 AM
My diet changes but on a typical day I have:


Meal 1: Oatmeal w/ 2 cups of skim milk
MetRx Protein Plus Shake

Total: 436 Cals 4g Fat 47 Carbs 55g Protein


Meal 2: 2 tbsp Natty Peanut Butter & Jelly on 2 slices white bread w/ 16oz water

Total: 766 Cals 22g Fat 77 Carbs 67g Protein


--WORKOUT--


Meal 3: 100% Whey Protein Shake w/ 2 Cups skim milk

Total: 1052 Cals 25g Fat 105 Carbs 104g Protein


Meal 4: 1 Can Tuna
2 slices white bread

Total: 1342 Cals 29g Fat 129 Carbs 140g Protein


Meal 5: 1 Cup Cottage Cheese(sometimes w/ peaches or pineapple)

2 slices Butterball turkey breast

Daily Total: 1600 Cals 33g Fat 141 Carbs 178g Protein




I substitute foods often and I have things in my diet such as

Chicken Breast
Chicken Salad
Salad
Boiled Eggs
Wheaties
Boca Burgers



Lately I've been adding in a couple other small things to add an extra 200 calories onto the scene. But like I said, I've been gaining fat.




-peace-

bradley
06-15-2003, 11:47 AM
I would recommend adding in some form of omega 3 fatty acids in your diet. You are not really getting any through the diet that you have listed above. You could add in some salmon to one of your meals or supplement with fish oil. If you go with the fish oil I would shoot for 6-8g per day.

Instead of the 2 cups of milk and protein postworkout how about 1 cup of milk, 20g of protein and then some form of carbs (dextrose, malto, white bread, oats, just some type of carb). I know you said you don't like the protein mixed with water so I guess milk will have to do:)

That would be a good start IMO. Keep everything the same and don't go performing huge amounts of cardio;) Remember dieting is a trial and error process and it will take some time. Just have to have a little patience.

GhettoSmurf
06-15-2003, 01:49 PM
in addition to what bradley said- lose the jelly (unless it is sugar-free), also change the white bread to wheat bread.

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 02:24 PM
No jelly??



:cry:




-peace-

GhettoSmurf
06-15-2003, 02:47 PM
Originally posted by Mic Soloist
No jelly??



:cry:




-peace-

if you can find sugar-free jelly then go 4 it. but jelly is basically pure sugar.

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 02:54 PM
Peanut butter and banana then I guess.....



Also what can I do to avoid putting sugar on my oatmeal?

Silverback
06-15-2003, 03:27 PM
splenda!!!! some also like cinnamon. What your taking on board is not normal, im not saying that nastily, but you should go and see your doc, i think you may have a thyroid problem??

good luck fella

B-R

SoulOfKoRea
06-15-2003, 03:44 PM
brown sugar or protein powders go well on oatmeal too... mmmm

bradley
06-15-2003, 04:15 PM
Originally posted by Mic Soloist
No jelly??


I don't think a tablespoon of jelly is going to hurt anything in the grand scheme of things. Just look for some 100% fruit jelly. There would be less sugar and overall cals in a small amount of jelly than in a banana.

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 05:20 PM
Originally posted by Big-Ron
What your taking on board is not normal, im not saying that nastily, but you should go and see your doc, i think you may have a thyroid problem??

good luck fella

B-R



What I'm taking on board?


what do u mean?



-peace-

Mic Soloist
06-15-2003, 10:15 PM
Is a thyroid condition something to worry about???

And what are the other symtoms?


Why would u think I have one?


-peace-

Mic Soloist
06-16-2003, 07:07 AM
???

GhettoSmurf
06-16-2003, 08:56 AM
Hypothyroidism

Definition:
Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland fails to produce enough thyroid hormone.



Alternative Names:
Myxedema; Adult hypothyroidism


Causes, incidence, and risk factors:
The thyroid gland, located in the front of the neck just below the larynx, secretes hormones that control metabolism. These hormones are thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).
The secretion of T3 and T4 is controlled by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus, which is part of the brain. Thyroid disorders may result not only from defects in the thyroid gland itself, but also from abnormalities of the pituitary or hypothalamus.

Hypothyroidism, or underactivity of the thyroid gland, may cause a variety of symptoms and may affect all body functions. The body's normal rate of functioning slows, causing mental and physical sluggishness. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe, with the most severe form called myxedema, which is a medical emergency.

The most common cause of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a disease of the thyroid gland where the body's immune system attacks the gland. Failure of the pituitary gland to secrete a hormone to stimulate the thyroid gland (secondary hypothyroidism) is a less common cause of hypothyroidism. Other causes include congenital defects, surgical removal of the thyroid gland, irradiation of the gland, or inflammatory conditions.

Risk factors include age over 50 years, female gender, obesity, thyroid surgery, and exposure of the neck to x-ray or radiation treatments.



Symptoms:
Early symptoms:

weakness
fatigue
cold intolerance
constipation
weight gain (unintentional)
depression
joint or muscle pain
thin, brittle fingernails
thin and brittle hair
pale color
Late symptoms:

slow speech
dry flaky skin
thickening of the skin
puffy face, hands and feet
decreased taste and smell
thinning of eyebrows
hoarseness
abnormal menstrual periods
Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:

overalls welling
muscle spasms (cramps)
muscle pain
muscle atrophy
uncoordinated movement
absent menstruation
joint stiffness
dry hair
hair loss
facial swelling
drowsiness
appetite loss
ankle, feet, and leg swelling
short stature
separated sutures
delayed formation or absence of teeth



Signs and tests:
A physical examination reveals delayed relaxation of muscles during tests of reflexes. Pale, yellow skin; loss of the outer edge of the eyebrows; thin and brittle hair; coarse facial features; brittle nails; firm swelling of the arms and legs; and mental slowing may be noted. Vital signs may reveal slow heart rate, low blood pressure, and low temperature.

A chest X-ray may reveal an enlarged heart.

Laboratory tests to determine thyroid function include:

T4 test (low)
serum TSH (high in primary hypothyroidism, low or low-normal in secondary hypothyroidism)
Additional laboratory abnormalities may include:

increased cholesterol levels
increased liver enzymes
increased serum prolactin
low serum sodium
a complete blood count (CBC) that shows anemia



Treatment:
This version of the Encyclopedia has no treatment information. Please discuss any and all treatment options for your condition with your healthcare professional.



Expectations (prognosis):
With treatment, return to the normal state is usual. Life-long medication is needed. Myxedema coma can result in death.



Complications:
Myxedema coma, the most severe form of hypothyroidism, is rare. It may be caused by an infection, illness, exposure to cold, or certain medications in an individual with untreated hypothyroidism. Symptoms and signs of myxedema coma include unresponsiveness, decreased breathing, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, and below normal temperature.

Other complications are heart disease, increased risk of infection, infertility, and miscarriage.



Calling your health care provider:
Call your health care provider if signs of hypothyroidism (or myxedema) are present.

Call your health care provider if chest pain or rapid heart beat occur, infection occurs, symptoms worsen or do not improve with treatment, or new symptoms develop.



Prevention:
There is no prevention for hypothyroidism; however, screening tests in newborns can detect congenital hypothyroidism.


Taken From: http://mercksource.com/pp/us/cns/cns_health_library_frame.jspzQzcdzEz3dzAzpgzEzzSzppzSzuszSzcnszSzcns_hl_adamzPzjspzQzpgzEzzSzppzSzus zSzcnszSzcontentzSzadamzSzencyzSzarticlezSz001159zPzhtm

bradley
06-16-2003, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by Mic Soloist
Is a thyroid condition something to worry about???

Yes, it is something that should be evaluated by a MD. I am not saying that I think you have a thyroid condition, but I will attempt to answer some of you questions. You might also try running a google search as well, seeing as how there is tons of information regarding thyroid conditions.



And what are the other symtoms?


This was taken from the following site:

http://www.emedicine.com/aaem/topic446.htm

"Hypothyroidism
Infants

Constipation
Poor feeding
Jaundice (yellow discoloration of the skin and eyes)
Excessive tiredness

Children

Similar to adult symptoms
Poor school performance

Adults

Early symptoms

Easy fatigue, exhaustion
Poor tolerance to cold temperatures
Constipation
Carpal tunnel syndrome (pain at the wrists and numbness of the hands)

Later symptoms

Poor appetite
Weight increase
Dry skin
Hair falls out
Intellectual ability worsens
Deeper, hoarse voice
Puffiness around the eyes
Depression

Hyperthyroidism

Children

Similar to adult symptoms
Declining school performance
Behavior problems

Adults

Insomnia
Hand tremors
Nervousness
Feeling excessively hot in normal or cold temperatures
Frequent bowel movements
Losing weight despite normal or increased appetite
Excessive sweating
Menstrual period becomes scant, or ceases altogether
Joint pains
Difficulty concentrating
Eyes seem to be enlarging

Elderly

Worsening of angina (chest pain) in person with heart disease
Worsening of shortness of breath in person with heart failure
Muscle weakness, especially in the shoulders and thighs"




Why would u think I have one?


I believe he came to this conclusion because of your slow metabolism (hypothyroidism). Might want to post this question in general health as Tryska or Delphi would be knowledgeable about thyroid conditions.

GhettoSmurf
06-16-2003, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by Mic Soloist

Why would u think I have one?


i think he thinks you might have one becuase you say you gain weight on such little calories.

but IMHO i dont think you have a problem with your thyroid. I wouldnt worry too too much about it.

Mic Soloist
06-16-2003, 10:54 AM
Originally posted by GhettoSmurf
Hypothyroidism

Definition:
Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland fails to produce enough thyroid hormone.



Alternative Names:
Myxedema; Adult hypothyroidism


Causes, incidence, and risk factors:
The thyroid gland, located in the front of the neck just below the larynx, secretes hormones that control metabolism. These hormones are thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).
The secretion of T3 and T4 is controlled by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus, which is part of the brain. Thyroid disorders may result not only from defects in the thyroid gland itself, but also from abnormalities of the pituitary or hypothalamus.

Hypothyroidism, or underactivity of the thyroid gland, may cause a variety of symptoms and may affect all body functions. The body's normal rate of functioning slows, causing mental and physical sluggishness. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe, with the most severe form called myxedema, which is a medical emergency.

The most common cause of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a disease of the thyroid gland where the body's immune system attacks the gland. Failure of the pituitary gland to secrete a hormone to stimulate the thyroid gland (secondary hypothyroidism) is a less common cause of hypothyroidism. Other causes include congenital defects, surgical removal of the thyroid gland, irradiation of the gland, or inflammatory conditions.

Risk factors include age over 50 years, female gender, obesity, thyroid surgery, and exposure of the neck to x-ray or radiation treatments.



Symptoms:
Early symptoms:

weakness
fatigue
cold intolerance
constipation
weight gain (unintentional)
depression
joint or muscle pain
thin, brittle fingernails
thin and brittle hair
pale color
Late symptoms:

slow speech
dry flaky skin
thickening of the skin
puffy face, hands and feet
decreased taste and smell
thinning of eyebrows
hoarseness
abnormal menstrual periods
Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:

overalls welling
muscle spasms (cramps)
muscle pain
muscle atrophy
uncoordinated movement
absent menstruation
joint stiffness
dry hair
hair loss
facial swelling
drowsiness
appetite loss
ankle, feet, and leg swelling
short stature
separated sutures
delayed formation or absence of teeth



Signs and tests:
A physical examination reveals delayed relaxation of muscles during tests of reflexes. Pale, yellow skin; loss of the outer edge of the eyebrows; thin and brittle hair; coarse facial features; brittle nails; firm swelling of the arms and legs; and mental slowing may be noted. Vital signs may reveal slow heart rate, low blood pressure, and low temperature.

A chest X-ray may reveal an enlarged heart.

Laboratory tests to determine thyroid function include:

T4 test (low)
serum TSH (high in primary hypothyroidism, low or low-normal in secondary hypothyroidism)
Additional laboratory abnormalities may include:

increased cholesterol levels
increased liver enzymes
increased serum prolactin
low serum sodium
a complete blood count (CBC) that shows anemia



Treatment:
This version of the Encyclopedia has no treatment information. Please discuss any and all treatment options for your condition with your healthcare professional.



Expectations (prognosis):
With treatment, return to the normal state is usual. Life-long medication is needed. Myxedema coma can result in death.



Complications:
Myxedema coma, the most severe form of hypothyroidism, is rare. It may be caused by an infection, illness, exposure to cold, or certain medications in an individual with untreated hypothyroidism. Symptoms and signs of myxedema coma include unresponsiveness, decreased breathing, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, and below normal temperature.

Other complications are heart disease, increased risk of infection, infertility, and miscarriage.



Calling your health care provider:
Call your health care provider if signs of hypothyroidism (or myxedema) are present.

Call your health care provider if chest pain or rapid heart beat occur, infection occurs, symptoms worsen or do not improve with treatment, or new symptoms develop.



Prevention:
There is no prevention for hypothyroidism; however, screening tests in newborns can detect congenital hypothyroidism.


Taken From: http://mercksource.com/pp/us/cns/cns_health_library_frame.jspzQzcdzEz3dzAzpgzEzzSzppzSzuszSzcnszSzcns_hl_adamzPzjspzQzpgzEzzSzppzSzus zSzcnszSzcontentzSzadamzSzencyzSzarticlezSz001159zPzhtm




I don't really have any of those symptoms...

Maybe one or two from time to time but I really don't have any of those.


-peace-

Mic Soloist
06-16-2003, 11:00 AM
Originally posted by GhettoSmurf


i think he thinks you might have one becuase you say you gain weight on such little calories.

but IMHO i dont think you have a problem with your thyroid. I wouldnt worry too too much about it.


well I am kinda pale without sun

I am a little forgetful but I used to smoke lots of weed

I am tired a lot but I don't usually get enough sleep

I do have a slow Motab but it's not like I am getting fat. I am just gaining a little on my waist... not a lot.



Who knows, I think I just have a naturally slow motabalism.



-peace-