PDA

View Full Version : If Meal Frequency is not that important....a ? of Protein Synthesis



WeakSauceAsian
06-26-2003, 04:06 PM
So,

I've read from another thread that Bradley linked us to, reflecting that during dieting, the actual frequency (gorging vs. nibbling) doesn't actually affect your fat loss/lbm very much, if at all.

But what about protein synthesis and muscle maintenance and/or growth? You can only synthesize so much protein at a sitting, and while on that topic, your muscles need consistent reinforcement right?

I already realize that dieting (cutting I'm assuming) vs. muscle growth is sort of an oxymoron - but what about bulking...and hey, why not, what ABOUT cutting and gorging vs. nibbling?

This seems like a newbie question/issue but Maki's post in the meal frequency thread gets me thinking.

Thanks,

WSA

bradley
06-26-2003, 04:27 PM
Keeping AA levels stable throughout the day has been shown to decrease nitrogen balance, and one could argue that the body responds better to a sharp increase in amino acids as compared to a steady stream. As long as you are not spacing meals out over too large of a time frame I do not think you are going to see any difference.

The whole eating more frequently would be the most helpful when trying to reach a specific calorie intake (high calorie intake) and it could also help as far as hunger is concerned.

bradley
06-26-2003, 04:40 PM
There are two studies in the thread that you mentioned about leucine balance which is an indicator of protein synthesis.


Leucine kinetics in reference to the effect of the feeding mode as
three discrete meals.

Raguso CA, El-Khoury AE, Young VR.

Laboratory of Human Nutrition, School of Science and Clinical Research
Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139, USA.

In a recent study, we observed that the 24-hour leucine oxidation
measured when three equal meals providing a generous intake of leucine
(approximately 90 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) are eaten during the day is 16%
lower (P < .01) than that for the same diet given as 10 hourly, equal
meals. We hypothesized that the pattern of meal intake at a lower
level of dietary leucine would affect the 24-hour rate of leucine
oxidation and possibly improve the retention of dietary leucine. A
total of 11 healthy adults participated in this investigation. The
daily leucine intake was 182 micromol x kg(-1) x d(-1) (38 mg x kg(-1)
x d(-1)) given with an L-amino acid diet. All subjects received three
discrete meals daily for 6 days prior to a 24-hour intravenous (IV)
tracer infusion of L-[1-13C]-leucine on day 7 (study 1). Four of these
subjects participated in two additional studies of similar design.
Study 2 involved giving [1-13C]-leucine as a constant IV infusion
together with tracer added to the amino acid mixture at each meal
time. In study 3, subjects received the three meals with added
[1-13C]-leucine tracer while [2H3]-leucine was given as a constant IV
infusion. Total leucine oxidation in studies 1 and 2 was 238+/-66 and
231+/-85 micromol x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively. Leucine balance was
positive, amounting to 18% of the total (diet + tracer) intake. The
estimated mean nitrogen balance was +8 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1). Leucine
oxidation was higher (P < .01) for breakfast than for the lunch meal.
This difference was associated with lower insulin and higher plasma
leucine concentrations at breakfast versus lunch periods. The results
from study 3 suggest that the higher rate of leucine oxidation
observed at breakfast as compared with lunch is not due to a
difference in the immediate splanchnic fate of absorbed leucine from
each meal. In comparison to our previous small frequent-meal studies,
the pattern of meal feeding influences overall leucine utilization at
both generous and limiting leucine intakes. Hence, it is possible that
the pattern of meal feeding may affect estimations of amino acid
requirements using the tracer-balance approach. Longer-term dietary
studies will be needed to establish whether and the extent to which
this is so.


The 24-h pattern and rate of leucine oxidation, with particular
reference to tracer estimates of leucine requirements in healthy
adults.

el-Khoury AE, Fukagawa NK, Sanchez M, Tsay RH, Gleason RE, Chapman TE,
Young VR.

Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Cambridge 02139.

Daily leucine oxidation and derived values for whole-body leucine
balance, obtained by continuous measurement throughout a 24-h period,
were compared with those predicted from short-term measurements during
fasted and fed states in five healthy adults studied during two 6-d
experimental diet periods, each immediately followed by a 24-h
continuous intravenous tracer infusion of L-[1-13C]leucine. Leucine
intake was either 14 or 38.3 mg.kg-1.d-1. Mean measured daily leucine
oxidation (mg leucine.kg-1.d-1) was 27.8 and 45.2 for the 14- and
38.3-mg intakes, respectively. Oxidation rates predicted by
extrapolation of rates measured during the final hour of fasting (15 h
after last meal) and the 5th h of feeding were approximately 12%
higher (P < 0.01) than measured rates for both diets. For the
prediction based on the 12th h of fasting and 5th h of feeding, it was
4% higher or 0.4% lower than measured rates for the 38.3- and 14- mg
intakes, respectively. Hence, relatively small differences exist
between measured vs predicted estimates of daily leucine oxidation and
balance. These studies support previous conclusions that the current,
international requirement value for leucine in healthy adults is far
too low.

WeakSauceAsian
06-26-2003, 04:45 PM
you are one considerate guy bradley.

Maki Riddington
06-27-2003, 11:37 AM
You don't need a lot of protein in your diet. I'm doing quite fine at about 100 grams a day right now.

manowar669
06-27-2003, 12:54 PM
I thought meal frequency was very important, whether bulking or cutting, to keep the metabolism high. I'm starting a new job monday, and I'm not sure how easy it will be for me to get away for a few minutes to poke a meal down my neck, at least until I get familiar with how things are run. I was trying to come up with extremely portable meals, like something I can keep in my pocket to stay on schedule. I have a few MetRx bars, I was also thinking of mixed nuts. 2 oz of almonds would be like 340 cals. Any other suggestions would be welcome. I'm cutting now, so if I could go like 4-5 hours without ill effects, then I won't sweat it.

bradley
06-27-2003, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by manowar669
I thought meal frequency was very important, whether bulking or cutting, to keep the metabolism high. I'm starting a new job monday, and I'm not sure how easy it will be for me to get away for a few minutes to poke a meal down my neck, at least until I get familiar with how things are run. I was trying to come up with extremely portable meals, like something I can keep in my pocket to stay on schedule. I have a few MetRx bars, I was also thinking of mixed nuts. 2 oz of almonds would be like 340 cals. Any other suggestions would be welcome.

As long as you eat a meal when you wake up in the morning and one before bed you should be fine eating every 4-5 hours. The main advantage to eating more frequently would be appetite control and also being able to eat more calories over the course of the day. Otherwise I do not think you will see much difference.

I used to eat 6 meals a day, but I have since cut down to 4 meals per day. I am finding that I like this approach better, and I seem to be less hungry when eating every 4-5 hours as opposed to every 2-3. The small meals were just teasing me, so to speak. I find that with the larger meals I actually get full.



I'm cutting now, so if I could go like 4-5 hours without ill effects, then I won't sweat it.

Don't sweat it:)