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Y2A
07-09-2003, 02:00 PM
How much is too much? Just got some Kashi GoLean and the stuff tastes great, so Im going to stick with it. Ill probably eat a cup and a half, twice a day, but that comes out to 40g of fiber :eek: Add to that another 10 or so I get from the beans and rice I eat with my chicken, and Im looking at 50g+ of fiber a day. Is that alright?

Ironman8
07-09-2003, 02:04 PM
I don't see anything wrong with eating alot of fiber. You'll just have to crap alot :)

raniali
07-09-2003, 02:07 PM
an adult should be getting a minimum of 30-35g a day
there is nothing wrong with more -- just stay hydrated

Y2A
07-09-2003, 02:20 PM
Originally posted by Ironman8
You'll just have to crap alot :)

A hidden benefit you dont hear about :D Damn, fiber + water = bloated stomach. *unbuckles belt* Thanks folks :)

raniali
07-09-2003, 02:23 PM
actually - fiber should help keep bloat down

Y2A
07-09-2003, 02:47 PM
Hmmmmmmmm, well 20g of fiber in one sitting sure makes you feel *extra* full, but maybe bloated is the wrong term.

Frankster
07-09-2003, 03:17 PM
Originally posted by raniali
actually - fiber should help keep bloat down

not me.. I'm always bloated when I up my fiber intake.

dreamwrld99
07-09-2003, 03:27 PM
actually fiber burns fat

raniali
07-09-2003, 03:39 PM
fiber is the miracle fat burner? which is especially amazing since it is never digested by the body.


... i say it should reduce bloat because water readily binds to fiber and is taken out more easily.

bradley
07-09-2003, 04:38 PM
Originally posted by raniali
fiber is the miracle fat burner? which is especially amazing since it is never digested by the body.

Fiber can be broken down by the bacteria that live in the colon, hence the reason for fiber causing gas and bloating in some individuals.:D

Fiber could help one burn fat by causing an individual to eat less, but I have never heard of fiber itself burning fat.

Frankster
07-09-2003, 05:03 PM
Originally posted by bradley


Fiber can be broken down by the bacteria that live in the colon, hence the reason for fiber causing gas and bloating in some individuals.:D



Err.. damn bacteria tuttut

raniali
07-09-2003, 05:07 PM
Originally posted by bradley


Fiber can be broken down by the bacteria that live in the colon, hence the reason for fiber causing gas and bloating in some individuals.:D


yes - but it is still not digested by the body

An expert panel of scientists has defined dietary fiber as "the parts of plant materials in the diet which are resistant to digestion by human enzymes."

bradley
07-10-2003, 02:22 AM
Originally posted by raniali


yes - but it is still not digested by the body

An expert panel of scientists has defined dietary fiber as "the parts of plant materials in the diet which are resistant to digestion by human enzymes."

Fiber can contribute a small amount of energy so I have to disagree, and the intestines are part of the body, right;)

This was taken from the following page:

http://www.ib.be/cefs/dietaryfibre.htm

"Dietary fibre as an energy source

More in-depth knowledge in the field has changed our thinking about dietary fibre, especially regarding its caloric contribution. Dietary fibre was initially considered as non-caloric. However, while it is not digested in the small intestine, many indigestible carbohydrates are nevertheless later fermented to varying degrees by the bacteria in the large intestine. Fermentation results notably in the production of short-chain fatty acids. They provide, on the one hand, energy and carbon necessary for the maintenance and growth of the microflora. On the other hand, a proportion of these short-chain fatty acids is absorbed by colonic cells and provide some energy to these cells or, after transfer into the circulation, to body tissues.

Since colonic fermentation is less efficient than absorption in the small intestine, the carbohydrate reaching the colon provide about 8 KJ/g (2 Kcal/g the dietary fibre ingested is degraded in the colon."

dirty-c
07-10-2003, 08:49 AM
So the low carb mantra of "Effective Carb Count" as being total carbohydrates minus fiber isnt entirely accurate. I always was suspect of that aspect of the gospel. Common sense dictates that there is no food on earth that you can eat massive quantities of and get no digestible calories. 2 calores per gram is a little bit higher than I would have guessed, but what do I know?

raniali
07-10-2003, 12:21 PM
bradley - i am not disagreeing with that statement you quoted, but just wanted to bring to light the following:
Dietary fiber can be described as a nutrient because most sources are fermented to varying degrees in the large intestine by our bacteria; it provides energy, but mainly for bacterial growth.
http://www.ift.org/publications/docshop/ft_shop/04-02/04_02_pdfs/04-02-nutraceuticals.pdf

just more food for thought.:cool:

raniali
07-10-2003, 12:29 PM
we both were correct in our original statements if one wants to differentiate between soluble and insoluble fiber.

Soluble fiber is rapidly fermented by intestinal bacteria once it reaches the large intestine. Foods high in insoluble fibers, such as wheat bran, are not fermented as easily by intestinal bacteria. This kind of fiber comes out with the stool and is the cause of the much needed bulking effect in the intestine.

Foods that are high in cellulose and lignin (sometimes called crude fiber) increase dry stool weight, but do not have the benefits of fiber fermentation.

additionally --
Since 1976, Dr. Alison Stephen, head of the division of nutrition and dietetics at the College of Pharmacy, University of Saskatchewan/Saskatoon, Saskatoon, Canada, has researched the role that different fibers contribute to health.

"Once the fibers we consume reach the large intestines, the bacteria in the large colon attack or ferment these fibers resulting in a number of different byproducts," says Stephen. "Research has shown these byproducts to be very important to the overall functioning of various organs in the body."

Stephen explains that three short-chain fatty acids -- acetate, propionate and butyrate -- are produced by the fermentation of digested fibers, and these fatty acids are currently providing an exciting area of nutrition research.

"Studies have linked propionate with fiber's effect on the body's cholesterol level as well as the treatment of diabetes," continues Stephen. "The production of butyrate, which comes from fiber consumption, seems to be necessary for the colon to function properly and may be linked to the role fiber plays in preventing colon cancer."

Because the consumption of both soluble and insoluble fibers leads to fermentation in the intestine, which in turn produces these short-chain fatty acids, scientists are currently researching how various fiber products are fermented and how the resulting by-products benefit the body and even prevent disease.

She currently is conducting research in Canada and the United Kingdom to further evaluate the fermentation of this vegetable fiber and the mechanism behind how it impacts the body's calcium and nitrogen balance. She will also study the amount of short-chain fatty acids produced in the colon through fermentation of the fiber.

Y2A
07-10-2003, 12:35 PM
Battle of the nutrition guru's :eek: :D

Oh well, time for my 20g of fiber cereal, do I count the calories or not!! ;)

bradley
07-10-2003, 01:37 PM
Good posts Raniali, and I agree that the calories derived from fiber are pretty much insignificant. :D

dreamwrld99
07-10-2003, 09:16 PM
when fiber is digested, it is fermented in the gut and converted into short-chained fatty acids, which can be burned for fuel. The burning of fatty acids from fiber sends a signal to your fat cells telling them to release fat,which your body uses for fuel. The fiber also creates a sense of feeling full.

bradley
07-11-2003, 02:41 AM
Originally posted by dreamwrld99
when fiber is digested, it is fermented in the gut and converted into short-chained fatty acids, which can be burned for fuel. The burning of fatty acids from fiber sends a signal to your fat cells telling them to release fat,which your body uses for fuel. The fiber also creates a sense of feeling full.

While I have read about this in relation to EFAs, but I have never seen it when referring to dietary fiber intake. Do you have any links or studies that would further explain this?