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View Full Version : The role of fiber and vegetables (besides making some activities require less effort)



WeakSauceAsian
07-16-2003, 05:07 PM
The role of fiber and vegetables? Thoughts?

This may just be me, but I always feel better the day after I have some vegetables - I find that I don't get many, but when I get a nice few servings or so, the next day I feel pretty good.

I know it's good for you (supplies some vitamins, etc.)... but concrete reasons why? I know they defnitely have their role, just not sure where exactly.

Holto
07-16-2003, 05:19 PM
improved absorption of nutrients in the GI tract

improved expulsion of toxins that get absorbed by the stool as it absorbs water while in the colon

food for organisms (symbiant bacteria) that live in your colon, these organisms turn excess fiber into EFA's (and I think vitamins)

WeakSauceAsian
07-16-2003, 05:36 PM
whoa... thank you holto, that's nuts.

Ironman8
07-16-2003, 06:11 PM
And makes you feel full longer.

Holto
07-16-2003, 07:53 PM
you might have known this but you can supp with those organisms also

even if you don't need more organisms in total sometimes supp'ing can restore the proper ratios of species and improve health

when I do take them I always get some Biffidus + acidophilus

bradley
07-17-2003, 03:46 AM
Originally posted by Holto
food for organisms (symbiant bacteria) that live in your colon, these organisms turn excess fiber into EFA's (and I think vitamins)

While I agree that fiber can be converted into short chain fatty acids, I have not seen anything that states that excess fiber can be converted into EFAs. I could be wrong but the whole idea behind essential fatty acids is the fact that they can not be synthesized by the body. The short chain fatty acids that are produced are used for energy by the bacteria, but some can also be absorbed and used by the body.

You are correct in that the bacteria also are responsible for the production in some vitamins. The bacteria in the colon are responsible for producing the majority of vitamin K that is used by the body.

The bacteria in the colon can also produce some B complex vitamins, but vitamin is not absorbed in the large intestine. There have been some studies that disagree, and say that B vitamins can be absorbed by the large intestine so the bacteria could also be a good source of B vitamins as well.

http://ajpcell.physiology.org/cgi/content/full/275/5/C1365


you might have known this but you can supp with those organisms also

even if you don't need more organisms in total sometimes supp'ing can restore the proper ratios of species and improve health

when I do take them I always get some Biffidus + acidophilus

You can also include things such as yogurt and cottage cheese that contain these helpful bacteria as well. Although you would need to look on the contain as most brands will specify if they contain live bacteria.

I have even seen some milk that has added bacteria in it as well:)

Beast
07-17-2003, 08:27 AM
Originally posted by bradley

You can also include things such as yogurt and cottage cheese that contain these helpful bacteria as well. Although you would need to look on the contain as most brands will specify if they contain live bacteria.
Lots of people used to do this in the olden days (eat yogurt to promote bacteria growth), but research has concluded that it really does not help that much anymore.

bradley
07-17-2003, 09:07 AM
Originally posted by NDBeast

Lots of people used to do this in the olden days (eat yogurt to promote bacteria growth), but research has concluded that it really does not help that much anymore.

Survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium sp. in the small intestine following ingestion in fermented milk. A rational basis for the use of probiotics in man]

[Article in French]

Marteau P, Pochart P, Bouhnik Y, Zidi S, Goderel I, Rambaud JC.

INSERM U290, Hopital Saint-Lazare, Paris.

Oro-ileal intubation was performed in 6 healthy volunteers who ingested, either 100 g of a fermented milk containing 10(8)/g Lactobacillus acidophilus and 10(7)/g Bifidobacterium sp or sterilized fermented milk along with a meal in random order. Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium were counted in the ileal fluid which was aspirated continuously for 8 h, and flow rates were calculated using the constant slow infusion of PEG 4000. After ingestion of fermented milk but not after control, hourly ileal flow rates of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium increased form 4.8 +/- 0.2 and 4.9 +/- 0.6 to 7.2 +/- 0.3 and 8.0 +/- 0.3, respectively (mean +/- SE log10 CFU). 8.3 +/- 0.2 Lactobacillus acidophilus and 8.8 +/- 0.1 Bifidobacterium were recovered in the ileum which represented 1.5 percent and 37.5 percent of the ingested bacteria, respectively. In conclusion, under usual conditions of fermented milk ingestion, a large number of living Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium pass through the upper gastrointestinal tract and reach the colon.

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Survival of bifidobacteria ingested via fermented milk during their passage through the human small intestine: an in vivo study using intestinal perfusion.

Pochart P, Marteau P, Bouhnik Y, Goderel I, Bourlioux P, Rambaud JC.

INSERM U290, Hopital Saint-Lazare, Paris, France.

The ability of a strain of Bifidobacterium sp to survive passage through the upper gastrointestinal tract when ingested in fermented milk was investigated in six fasting healthy adults by using in vivo ileal perfusion. After ingestion of 10.0 +/- 0.5 log10 bifidobacteria in 400 g fermented milk, ileal flow of bifidobacteria increased significantly and reached a maximum of 8.8 +/- 0.2 log10 bifidobacteria/h 1.7 +/- 0.4 h after ingestion of fermented milk. The average number of bifidobacteria recovered from the terminal ileum during the 8 h after fermented-milk ingestion was 9.0 +/- 0.1 log10 and constituted 23.5 +/- 10.4% of the number ingested. These results indicate that in healthy adults Bifidobacterium sp survive transit through the gastrointestinal tract when ingested in fermented milk. Further studies are needed to investigate the behavior of these exogenous bacteria in the colonic lumen and to explore their effects on the physiology of the human gastrointestinal tract.