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Manveet
07-17-2003, 10:55 AM
Is there any difference in the saturated fat that comes from plant/vegetable sources like natty pb and olive oil and the stuff that comes from meat and poultry like beef and eggs?

Basically what I'm trying to ask is, would you be better off comsuming more sat fat from plant/vegetable sources than from meat and poultry sources?

GhettoSmurf
07-17-2003, 11:05 AM
thats a good question manveet. ive never really thought about it. if i would have to GUESS, i would guess that there is no difference. BUT if there was a difference, i would assume the saturated fat from animals would be worse then the fat from plants.

reloaded
07-17-2003, 11:38 AM
what about eating stuff like bacon? i eat bacon all the time, does that do anything for bulking or protein?

Ironman8
07-17-2003, 12:44 PM
Well, bacon has quite alot of fat, so you'll definitly get bigger.

WillKuenzel
07-17-2003, 12:49 PM
I would kill for some bacon right now. I've been craving it like crazy lately.

Overall though, isn't keep sat fat levels low the best idea?

Manveet
07-17-2003, 01:15 PM
Ya, you want to keep low, but sat fat is still essential.

What I was wondering was, could I get away with a little more sat fat if I was getting it from sources such as olive oil and natty pb instead of meat/eggs/milk?

bradley
07-17-2003, 05:15 PM
Originally posted by Manveet
Is there any difference in the saturated fat that comes from plant/vegetable sources like natty pb and olive oil and the stuff that comes from meat and poultry like beef and eggs?

Saturated fat is the term used to describe the structure of a fatty acid. Baiscally a saturated fatty acid has all carbon atoms bonded to two hydrogen atoms between the alpha and omega carbon atoms. The structure will be the same whether from plant or animal sources. Although the saturated fatty acids will vary in length which will change the way they are used by the body.

The following is from Robboe's article "Deciphering Fats" on the WBB main page.

"Saturated fats with carbon chain lengths below 10 have been shown to have no effect, or at least a ‘neutral’ effect on cholesterol (1). These are the so-called medium chain triglycerides (MCTs).


How is this possible?

When you ingest a fat, the different triacylglycerols (the tertiary structure of glycerol) and fatty acids are processed in accordance with the individual chemical properties they display. This means, that as stated above, the fats with carbon chain length 10 or less enter through the intestines and are transported to the liver bound to a protein. The fats with carbon chain length longer than 12 require bile salts, are put into chylomicrons (lipoprotein complexes that carry dietary lipids, including cholesterol) and require special fatty acid binding proteins. The chylomicrons carry the lipids into the blood stream via the lymphatic system.

However, this is not the case for every saturated fatty acid above the ‘cut-off’ point of 12-length carbon chain. For example, stearic acid (18:0), despite lowering HDL levels, has been shown to decrease LDL levels of serum cholesterol in the blood (2). There has also been a study stating that Stearic acid neither raises nor lowers blood cholesterol and is in fact ‘neutral’ (4). However, its trans-fatty acid counterpart Elaidic acid (trans-18:1,9) actually reduces HDL levels further (2), which emphasises my point of avoiding trans-fatty acids completely. This means that if you have a fat source high in stearic acid, it is practically harmless, if not helpful. Stearic acid and palmitic acid are the two main types of saturated fatty acids found in the common fat choices of bodybuilders.

The metabolism of fats with chain length of 14 or longer is clearly different to the metabolism of fats with chain length shorter than 12, but the fatty acid Lauric acid (14:0) which lies on ‘the edge’, shares properties of the fats with chain lengths either side of it’s own. Lauric acid’s effect on cholesterol (6) is similar to that of the longer chain lengths like Myristic acid (14:0), Palmitic acid (16:0) and Margaric acid (17:0). It also has the capacity to reduce the blood levels of triglycerides, which are easily oxidised. This means that coconut milk, which has taken many bashings in its time, can actually be beneficial despite it’s high saturated fat content because of it’s high lauric acid content. As usual, this really only works with moderate use, since too much saturated fat is detrimental to health."



Basically what I'm trying to ask is, would you be better off comsuming more sat fat from plant/vegetable sources than from meat and poultry sources?

It would really depend on which saturated fatty acids you were consuming (length). You can use the USDA database to determing the lengths of the saturated fats that different foods contain.


Ya, you want to keep low, but sat fat is still essential.

Well not necessarily essential to the body;)

bradley
07-17-2003, 05:20 PM
Originally posted by reloaded
what about eating stuff like bacon? i eat bacon all the time, does that do anything for bulking or protein?

Bacon is pretty much just fat with a small amount of protein, and there are much better fat sources other than bacon.:)

hemants
07-18-2003, 07:57 AM
As Bradly says, there are different subfractions within saturated fat.

Hypothetically a saturated fat that doesn't have a lot of palmitic acid might be less harmful. Only problem is, I haven't been able to a food source that doesn't contain palmitic acid.