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p_t
07-29-2003, 01:42 AM
So I've been searching this forum looking for a basic cutting diet to follow when creating a diea for ones self while still being able to keep lean body mass. Kinda looking for a meal plan. Even more in depth looking for a weekly meal plan.

Relentless
07-29-2003, 07:31 AM
www.theketogenicdiet.com

worked for me.

robthoburn
07-29-2003, 08:04 PM
Originally posted by p_t
So I've been searching this forum looking for a basic cutting diet to follow when creating a diea for ones self while still being able to keep lean body mass. Kinda looking for a meal plan. Even more in depth looking for a weekly meal plan.

Read my article on the Glucose Economy at http://www.1fast400.com/article.php?a_id=2

The Glucose Economy is not really a diet at all. It's a concept, one that finds the common thread linking together every diet you can imagine.

Once you've read the article, start reducing your carbohydrate intake and replacing it with protein until you start seeing the increased muscularity (that hard, 'dry' look) that you're looking for.

I'm using a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet right now that is working fantastic for staying lean and hard (about 7-7.5% body fat).

Here's a link to my 'diary': http://forum.avantlabs.com/index.php?act=ST&f=10&t=4948

Let me know if you have any other questions. Hope my suggestions are helpful in some way.

Apprecatively,
Rob

bradley
07-30-2003, 03:44 AM
Originally posted by robthoburn
I'm using a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet right now that is working fantastic for staying lean and hard (about 7-7.5% body fat).

Here's a link to my 'diary': http://forum.avantlabs.com/index.php?act=ST&f=10&t=4948

Let me know if you have any other questions. Hope my suggestions are helpful in some way.


Rob-

I was curious as to whether you plan on implementing dieting strategies from both your glucose economy diet and the high protein/low carb diet? Have you considered using a moderate carb/fat approach instead of going between the two extremes?

BTW I started implementing some of the ideas in your glucose economy diet into my own diet, and the changes seem to help as far as performance in the gym, energy levels, etc. The only thing that is of concern is the low fat intake, seeing as how the only fat I am taking in is from fish oil supplements and the small amount I get from whole foods. How much supplemental fat do you feel is necessary when using the glucose economy diet? Thanks in advancce:)

robthoburn
07-30-2003, 10:35 AM
Originally posted by bradley


Rob-

I was curious as to whether you plan on implementing dieting strategies from both your glucose economy diet and the high protein/low carb diet? Have you considered using a moderate carb/fat approach instead of going between the two extremes?

How much supplemental fat do you feel is necessary when using the glucose economy diet? Thanks in advancce:)

As far as the moderate carb/fatapproach goes, I definitely think this can be worthwhile. One thing some people don't understand --and it's the fault of my writing (not very good)-- is that the Glucose Economy is a concept, not a diet. I developed it as a simple means to explain how any diet can be made to 'work' for fail. It all depends on the status of your Glucose Economy.

With the above in mind, a diet more moderate in carbohydrate can work great. The diet I am following right now provides a small amount of carbohydrate (probably not what you'd consider 'moderate'). I'm probably getting about 40 or 50 grams a day. For me, that is 'moderate' relative to what I normally eat on a carbohydrate-restricted diet.

The bulk of my carbs are currently coming from asparagus, broccoli, and 2 small protein shakes (from the 'non-fat' milk') and the protein powder (7 grams per two scoops). For more details on this, see my "Threatening the Glucose Economy" thread at www.avantlabs.com in the forum there.

As far as supplemental fat is concerned, this is really an individual matter, much like any other (macro)nutrient. Simply put, your body doesn't strictly require any other fat than those it can't synthesize adequately on its own (i.e., 'essential' fatty acids). Still, there may be some benefits to giving it a hand by supply something more than just EFAs.

My current eating approach provides ample fat, as I eat whole eggs, steak, roast, chicken. I do not eat cheese or other processed fats (oils, mayonaisse, etc.). I pop a couple of fish oil capsules every few days, and occasionally my girlfriend barbeques fresh salmon steaks for me. This seems to work nicely.

What I suggest you do is just experiment. Try a moderate-carbohydrate/-fat diet like you suggest. 'Moderate fat' suggests to me that you will not need any supplemental fat, unless you happen to be picking less-than-desirable foods and failing to get enough EFAs. Really, you hardly need any EFAs at all, so it's hard to screw up if you pick whole, unprocessed ('back to nature') foods. Even having a serving of cold-water fish, such as salmon, a 1 or 2 times per week would be great. If you can't do something like that, then experiment with fish oils, starting with a couple capsules a day, every other day or so.

Hope this helps.

Rob