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View Full Version : Cutting to bulking - glycemic considerations



hemants
08-14-2003, 06:51 AM
Okay, I just finished a cutting cycle and what worked for me was a shift to a much higher fibre/lower glycemic set of carbohydrates.

My question is this, if I'm not switching to bulking aiming at 1lb a week (500 calories per day). Would it also make sense to increase the overall glycemic index of foods slightly to make sure that nutrients are absorbed for growth?

Or would you say that it's better to stick with slow digesting foods and just eat more of them?

bradley
08-14-2003, 10:34 AM
Originally posted by hemants
My question is this, if I'm not switching to bulking aiming at 1lb a week (500 calories per day). Would it also make sense to increase the overall glycemic index of foods slightly to make sure that nutrients are absorbed for growth?


The nutrients would be absorbed either way, and it is really a matter of how fast the nutrients will be digested/absorbed.



Or would you say that it's better to stick with slow digesting foods and just eat more of them?

Basing your diet around low GI carbs (except pre/post workout), makes the most sense IMO. I really do not believe that it is going to make any significant difference in the amount of LBM/bf you gain, but as far as appetite control it would probably make a difference.

rgkfit
08-17-2003, 08:34 AM
Diet always is the determing factor in what you get out of your workouts, whether gaining or losing. To gain lean mass, you have to have a calorie intake sufficient enought to do so. The only time you have to increase the glycemic index of your foods is the possible exception of post workout. The quickest way to short circuit gains is rising and falling blood sugars.

bradley
08-17-2003, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by rgkfit
The quickest way to short circuit gains is rising and falling blood sugars.

Could you please explain your reasoning behind this? Thanks in advance.:)

restless
08-17-2003, 09:40 AM
Originally posted by bradley


Could you please explain your reasoning behind this? Thanks in advance.:)

He probably is refering to the negative impact that unstable blood sugar levels can have on appetite control. It cn be an issue for some people and it's one of the reasons low carb/keto has an adge over regular high carb diets.

bradley
08-17-2003, 11:10 AM
Originally posted by restless


He probably is refering to the negative impact that unstable blood sugar levels can have on appetite control. It cn be an issue for some people and it's one of the reasons low carb/keto has an adge over regular high carb diets.

I understand the point you are making, but overeating will not affect your gains, although it will increase your bf.

rgkfit
08-17-2003, 06:05 PM
Originally posted by bradley


I understand the point you are making, but overeating will not affect your gains, although it will increase your bf.

I was referring to the question of high glycemic carbs throughout the day, (this was in question to me),not the amount of food. One thing you don't want is insulin surges throughout the day. Keeping blood sugars level with low glycemic foods is the best way to proceed, underterminate of the amounts you eat.;)