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Frankster
08-14-2003, 04:31 PM
I bought some candy (jely beans) and GNC that are mostly sugar alcohols. They say it's non-impact carbs and shouldn't be counted because it doesn't affect sugar levels. I'm skeptic so I thought I'd ask the experts before eating them. If they are really the same as carbs, I'll just save them for after my diet, but damn, that makes for some damn expensive jelly beans. The company is Carborite.

bradley
08-14-2003, 04:44 PM
Sugar alcohols can have a negligible impact on blood sugar levels, but the effect on blood sugar levels would be less than that of say sucrose.

If you were to eat large amounts of sugar alcohols, you might experience some gastrointestinal problems.

Delphi
08-14-2003, 04:49 PM
Sounds like they contain sorbitol. It is poorly absorbed and digested by human, so it leads to lower glucose levels and less insulin secretion than glucose.

Bacteria in your colon can ferment it, so you get nasty gas. Plus it holds on to water, so you get diarrhea.

http://www.caloriecontrol.org/sorbitol.html

Frankster
08-14-2003, 04:49 PM
So should one count them in the total calories of the day?

Delphi
08-14-2003, 04:51 PM
I would count them as carbs. You just don't get as many calories as some other carb sources.

Frankster
08-14-2003, 05:27 PM
Oh alright, that's what I tought, I find it deceiving the way they market these things, makes dieting people like me drool thinking we can have candy whitout adding extra calories to our diets.

ectx
08-14-2003, 09:09 PM
Delphi...how well are sugar alcohols absorbed? I thought digestion of them was extremely low (read single digit value). I'm a huge fan of splenda which is why I ask. It uses a different sugar alcohol than sorbitol. In my experience it causes a lot less intestinal discomfort. Damn that colonic flora! Damn it to hell!

bradley
08-15-2003, 02:56 AM
Splenda is a sugar substitute (sucralose), not a sugar alcohol (mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, isomalt, maltitol and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates).

Sugar substitutes contain zero calories per gram, where as sugar alcohols will yield ~2.6 calories per gram.

bradley
08-15-2003, 03:06 AM
Net energy value of two low-digestible carbohydrates, Lycasin HBC and the hydrogenated polysaccharide fraction of Lycasin HBC in healthy human subjects and their impact on nutrient digestive utilization.

Sinau S, Montaunier C, Wils D, Verne J, Brandolini M, Bouteloup-Demange C, Vermorel M.

Centre de Recherches en Nutrition Humaine d'Auvergne INRA, UR Metabolismes Energetique et Lipidique, Saint-Genes Champanelle, France.

The metabolizable energy content of low-digestible carbohydrates does not correspond with their true energy value. The aim of the present study was to determine the tolerance and effects of two polyols on digestion and energy expenditure in healthy men, as well as their digestible, metabolizable and net energy values. Nine healthy men were fed for 32 d periods a maintenance diet supplemented either with dextrose, Lycasin HBC (Roquette Freres, Lestrem, France), or the hydrogenated polysaccharide fraction of Lycasin HBC, at a level of 100 g DM/d in six equal doses per d according to a 3 x 3 Latin square design with three repetitions. After a 20 d progressive adaptation period, food intake was determined for 12d using the duplicate meal method and faeces and urine were collected for 10 d for further analyses. Subjects spent 36 h in one of two open-circuit whole-body calorimeters with measurements during the last 24h. Ingestion of the polyols did not cause severe digestive disorders, except excessive gas emission, and flatulence and gurgling in some subjects. The polyols induced significant increases in wet (+45 and +66% respectively, P<0.01) and dry (+53 and +75 % respectively, P<0.002) stool weight, resulting in a 2% decrease in dietary energy digestibility (P<0.001). They resulted also in significant increases in sleeping (+4.1%, P<0.03) and daily energy expenditure (+2.7 and +2.9% respectively, P<0.02) compared with dextrose ingestion. The apparent energy digestibility of the two polyols was 0.82 and 0.79 respectively, their metabolizable energy value averaged 14.1 kJ/g DM, and their net energy value averaged 10.8 kJ/g DM, that is, 35 % less than those of sucrose and starch.

ectx
08-15-2003, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by bradley
Splenda is a sugar substitute (sucralose), not a sugar alcohol (mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, isomalt, maltitol and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates).

Sugar substitutes contain zero calories per gram, where as sugar alcohols will yield ~2.6 calories per gram.

Thanks for the clarification Bradley. I red the packaging info and saw that it was made with sucrose and just assumed it was its alcohol. Perhaps this explains why it doesn't cause any intestinal discomfort (in my experience). I looked up more info on it because its suffix implies it is a sucrose polymer...apparently it's a chlorinated sucrose. The basic sugar is chlorinated so that three hydroxyl groups are replaced with chlorine groups. It's kind of cool how adding or subracting groups affects a compound metabolically.

eitherway, thanks for the clearing that up for me.

btw...I found varying information on absorption of the compound...according to the FDA between 11-17%...although absorption does not mean it is metabolized.

Frankster
08-16-2003, 08:09 AM
OMG, yesterday I ate those jelly beans.. #%@#$@# JELLY BEANS FROM HELL... I never had an upset stomach like that, I had gas so bad I thought I was gonna explode, my stomach was stretched so much, it hurt my abs... Not worth eating in my opinion.. jesus.. those are some nuclear jelly beans