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GhettoSmurf
08-20-2003, 05:28 PM
Ok bros, I need some help or at least some opinions.

This is how my day has been:

-Pre-workout meal- P/C
-Workout
-Post-workout shake- P/C
-Post-workout meal (1 hour after shake)- P/C
-Next Meal (about 2-3 hours after post-workout meal)- P/C? or P/F? <----- Should this meal be P/C or P/F? or doesnt it matter?
-Final meal- P/F
-BED

JuniorMint6669
08-20-2003, 05:30 PM
doesnt matter (just my opinion:))

rgkfit
08-20-2003, 07:04 PM
Have some healthy fats, but other than that, as long as you are having low glycemic carbs, so not to invoke any insulin response, it is really ok. Keeping blood sugars steady is key here after getting them regulated from your post workout shake.

bradley
08-21-2003, 02:38 AM
Food combining is just theory and has not really shown any real world results. Just keep fat to a minimum pre/post workout and then have a little of each macro nutrient with your other meals. Your body is perfectly capable of storing fat without the presence of insulin (ASP), and protein itself can also cause an insulin respnse.
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The metabolic response of subjects with type 2 diabetes to a high-protein, weight-maintenance diet.

Nuttall FQ, Gannon MC, Saeed A, Jordan K, Hoover H.

Metabolic Research Laboratory and the Section of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55417, USA.

In a randomized, crossover 5-wk study design, we recently reported that a weight-maintaining diet in which the percentage of total food energy as protein was increased from 15-30% resulted in a decrease in postprandial glucose and glycohemoglobin in people with untreated type 2 diabetes without a significant change in insulin. Protein was substituted for carbohydrate in the diet. The fat content remained unchanged. In this publication, we present data on other hormones and metabolites that were considered to potentially be affected by substitution of protein for carbohydrate in the diet. The mean fasting plasma GH and total IGF-I concentrations were elevated on the 30% protein diet. The urinary free cortisol also was increased. However, the urinary aldosterone was unchanged. Although urinary pH was decreased, calcium excretion was not significantly increased. The plasma postprandial alpha-amino nitrogen concentrations were increased, but the 24-h integrated concentration was unchanged, indicating an accelerated amino acid removal rate. The plasma urea nitrogen was increased as expected. The urea production rate also was increased such that a new steady-state fasting value was present. The calculated urea production rate accounted for 97% of the protein ingested on the 15% protein diet, but only 80% on the 30% protein diet, suggesting net nitrogen retention on the high-protein diet. In conclusion, an increase in dietary protein results in a number of metabolic adaptations in addition to reducing the circulating glucose concentration. Serum TSH, total T(3), free T(4), B(12), folate, homocysteine, uric acid, and creatinine concentrations were unchanged.

bradley
08-21-2003, 02:41 AM
Originally posted by rgkfit
Have some healthy fats, but other than that, as long as you are having low glycemic carbs, so not to invoke any insulin response, it is really ok. Keeping blood sugars steady is key here after getting them regulated from your post workout shake.

Low GI carbs will cause an insulin response, but the insulin respose will be smaller than the insulin response caused by eating high GI carbs.