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View Full Version : Bulking and calorie reality check.



hemants
08-21-2003, 08:35 AM
I would think that we would all assume that 50lbs of lean muscle in a year would be a tremendous feat (if it is even attainable!)

That would be 1 lb of LBM per week.

That would require 3500 extra calories per week or 500 extra calories per day.

So why then do people talk about eating everything you can stuff your face with. Aren't you just going to turn that extra food into fat?

Discuss.

Trent_Steel
08-21-2003, 08:40 AM
Isnt it protein you need to build up muscles?
So I reckon in my unscientific way you need to get load of protein and cut the fat and carbs as they dont build up muscle.

hemants
08-21-2003, 08:58 AM
Your body only needs so much protein. The reason people take in extra is to be "better safe than sorry". But more than anything your muscles need glucose and water to repair. Cutting back carbs and fat is just going to make your body convert unneeded protein into glucose. (An expensive and innefficient process).

huntred
08-21-2003, 09:40 AM
now too sure about turning extra food into FAT


doubt that's possible



the excess usually gets processed and leaves your body

restless
08-21-2003, 10:15 AM
Originally posted by huntred
now too sure about turning extra food into FAT


doubt that's possible



the excess usually gets processed and leaves your body

Is that a joke? Seriously, not trying to be an asshole here.

huntred
08-21-2003, 10:36 AM
pray tell what does it do then?


not an ass, possibly "unknowledgeable"

pff

pruneman
08-21-2003, 10:58 AM
Originally posted by huntred
pray tell what does it do then?


not an ass, possibly "unknowledgeable"

pff

When you eat food, it is either used immediately for energy, stored as glycogen (a source of energy) in the muscles and liver, or stored in adipose tissue (fat). The body is only capable of storing a certain amount of glycogen. After this amount is exceeded, the extra calories are stored as fat (some is also used to synthesize new muscle tissue). It makes no difference in the source of calories. If you eat too much of anything it will be stored as fat. This is why the accepted amount of weight one should try to gain in a week is between 0.5-1 pound.

hope that helped

huntred
08-21-2003, 11:05 AM
right then

hemants
08-21-2003, 11:11 AM
"This is why the accepted amount of weight one should try to gain in a week is between 0.5-1 pound"

That would imply that there is no point taking in more than 250-500 extra calories per day then correct?

ryan1117
08-21-2003, 11:22 AM
I agree with you. My guess is that some people just want to gain weight and they don't care if a lot of it is fat. I know I went the 1 pound per week route for about 10 weeks last spring. I wasn't terribly happy with the results. I seemed to gain as much or more fat as lean body mass.

I'm probably going to aim for a pound per month this upcoming fall. I'm not in a hurry to gain weight, and hopefully the gain can be pretty much lean body mass.

Manveet
08-21-2003, 11:48 AM
Originally posted by hemants
I would think that we would all assume that 50lbs of lean muscle in a year would be a tremendous feat (if it is even attainable!)

That would be 1 lb of LBM per week.

That would require 3500 extra calories per week or 500 extra calories per day.

So why then do people talk about eating everything you can stuff your face with. Aren't you just going to turn that extra food into fat?

Discuss.

500 extra calories a day does make sense. Considering that those calories are on top your maintenance level calories.

bradley
08-21-2003, 04:34 PM
Originally posted by hemants
I would think that we would all assume that 50lbs of lean muscle in a year would be a tremendous feat (if it is even attainable!)

That would be 1 lb of LBM per week.

That would require 3500 extra calories per week or 500 extra calories per day.

So why then do people talk about eating everything you can stuff your face with. Aren't you just going to turn that extra food into fat?

Discuss.

While the above sounds good in theory, I think you are overlooking things such as the bodies natural setpoint. Your body will try and maintain a certain amount of LBM/bf, although I think it is safe to say that this is more in relation to losing bf, than increasing muscle mass.

Anyway, a good example would be ectomorphs, who seem to be able to eat tremendous amounts of cals and still have trouble gaining weight. The body defends the setpoint by increasing metabolic rate, increasing energy expenditure, blunting of appetite, etc.

I think this is where the "eat everything in site" mentality comes from, although for us endo-mesomorphs this would not be wise.;)

Berserker
08-21-2003, 04:36 PM
I think some people just want an excuse to be a pig or an excuse for lack of discipline. I wonder what the ratio of bulkers to cutters is?

smalls
08-21-2003, 04:41 PM
Bradley nailed it. How many people do you hear say "I can't gain weight." That is where the eat everything attitude comes in. Once people have the dedication and knowledge to count calories and know their bodies, they can gain weight in a more controled manner.

JuniorMint6669
08-22-2003, 12:18 AM
I think you are misunderstanding 1lb=3500 calories. 1 pound of fat = 3500 calories. 1 pound = 454g, multiplied by 9 calories per gram of fat... is this right? someone correct me if im wrong but i busted out the calculator and this is ~4000 calories. OK on second thought, maybe I am the one who is not understanding. ANYWAYS...

lets pretend i am right. 1 pound of LBM does not = 1 pound of fat, calorically speaking. Also i think a lot of the calories go towards the process of making muscle.

This is just how i always thought of it, but someone please step in and correct me if im making myself look stupid :)

Reinier
08-22-2003, 03:11 AM
soem people cant make it to 500 kcals extra even if they eat it all up. some people have a metabolism like that. they should "bulk" in that fashion. People who dont should use common sense

bradley
08-22-2003, 03:34 AM
Originally posted by JuniorMint6669
I think you are misunderstanding 1lb=3500 calories. 1 pound of fat = 3500 calories. 1 pound = 454g, multiplied by 9 calories per gram of fat... is this right? someone correct me if im wrong but i busted out the calculator and this is ~4000 calories. OK on second thought, maybe I am the one who is not understanding. ANYWAYS...

1 pound of fat equals 3500 calories, which relates to the amount of energy that is stored in that one pound of fat. There are other things that make up that pound of fat (water, etc.)

One pound of muscle contains ~120g of protein which comes out to be around 480 calories, but muscle also contains a large amount of water and glycogen.



lets pretend i am right. 1 pound of LBM does not = 1 pound of fat, calorically speaking. Also i think a lot of the calories go towards the process of making muscle.

This kind of gets into nutrient partitioning, and yes there are times when more calories will be directed toward muscle cells instead of fat cells.

JuniorMint6669
08-22-2003, 04:43 PM
Originally posted by bradley


1 pound of fat equals 3500 calories, which relates to the amount of energy that is stored in that one pound of fat. There are other things that make up that pound of fat (water, etc.)

interesting... hmm i thought fat was fat. ie 10g of olive oil contains 90 calories at 9 cal per gram. Im confused, why do we say 1 pound of fat if its not all fat? As opposed to saying "1 pound of adipose tissue"? I really know nothing about this, so if you could direct me to some info bradley, that would be greatly appreciated.

bradley
08-22-2003, 05:05 PM
Originally posted by JuniorMint6669


interesting... hmm i thought fat was fat. ie 10g of olive oil contains 90 calories at 9 cal per gram.

That is correct because you are referring to olive oil, which is pure fat. If you were to put another substance in the olive oil you would dilute the amount of fat per gram.



Im confused, why do we say 1 pound of fat if its not all fat? As opposed to saying "1 pound of adipose tissue"? I really know nothing about this, so if you could direct me to some info bradley, that would be greatly appreciated.

Water makes up over half of the total bodyweight in humans (~60%), and it is just practical to include the weight of water as part of our actual bodyweight. You would not want to subtract the amount of water from your actual bodyweight to determine the weight of the other substances in your body.

We say 1lb. of fat because it is actually one pound of fat, but that one pound of fat correlates to ~3500 cals, since some of the weight is attributed to water, etc. Fat is made up of adipocytes (fat cells), which are not pure fat.

JuniorMint6669
08-22-2003, 05:21 PM
Originally posted by bradley


Fat is made up of adipocytes (fat cells), which are not pure fat.

Here we go! Thats what i was looking for. Is olive oil not made up of fat cells then?

1 pound of olive oil = 4000 calories? 1 pound of human fat = 3500? So we should use human fat for low fat fried foods? J/k thats gross ;)

Looking at that quote again, to summarize, you just said "fat is not pure fat" which confuses me :D but i think i understand now.

bradley
08-23-2003, 04:31 AM
Originally posted by JuniorMint6669


Here we go! Thats what i was looking for. Is olive oil not made up of fat cells then?

The olive oil you buy in a store is not composed of cells, because the oil you see in a store has been pressed out of the cells of the olive, hence the reason most high quality olive oils say cold pressed.

http://www.olivetree.eat-online.net/frameoliveoil.htm
"The first step of extraction is crushing the olives to form a paste. The oil, comprising 20% to 30% of the olive, is nestled in pockets within the fruit's cells. The olives are crushed in a mill with two granite millstones rolling within a metal basin. Crushing and mixing the olives releases the oil from the cells of the olive without heating the paste. A side shutter on the mill's basin allows the mixed olive paste to be discharged and applied to round mats. The mats are stacked and placed under the head of a hydraulic press frame that applies downward pressure and extracts the oil. The first pressing yields the superior quality oil, and the second and third pressings produce an inferior quality oil. "



Looking at that quote again, to summarize, you just said "fat is not pure fat" which confuses me :D but i think i understand now.

Adipose tissue is not made up of just triglycerides, because as I mentioned above, fat is made up of cells and the cells contain other substances besides triglycerides.

I more accurate statement would have been body fat is not pure fat.:)