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dyslexic_banana
08-21-2003, 08:19 PM
I've recently been making an attempt to adhere to a better diet, in keeping with my bodybuilding. I was wondering, what is an ideal amount of calories a day? I'm currently on, typically, 2700-2800 (it varies between 2500 and 3000). I'm 21, slim, don't really excercise too much otherwise, and am trying to get as muscular as is possible. Does the fact that I have a high metabolism mean that I require more calories?

Also, how important are the sources of calories? My diet consists of a couple of protein shakes a day (plus a protein drink, on days when I workout), a 1215 calorie chicken pie (spread out over two sittings - it comes as a convenient source of calories, but does have a reasonably high fat content, and doesn't provide as much protein as you might expect for 1215 calories), a banana, 200g of pasta plus maybe 200g of chicken, as well as some Shredded Wheat. How does this sound? I am aware that I don't eat much in the way of vegetables.......I also get about 100g of fat a day. Is this too high? I get close to 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight a day. I probably get close to 300g carbs a day.

Any advice/feedback would be much appreciated.

bradley
08-22-2003, 02:40 AM
Originally posted by dyslexic_banana
I've recently been making an attempt to adhere to a better diet, in keeping with my bodybuilding. I was wondering, what is an ideal amount of calories a day? I'm currently on, typically, 2700-2800 (it varies between 2500 and 3000). I'm 21, slim, don't really excercise too much otherwise, and am trying to get as muscular as is possible.

Just increase your daily calories in small increments each week until you are gaining a small amount of weight each week (~.5-1lb. per week). Each individual will be different, as far as the amount of calories needed to cause weight gain. You can use a site like www.fitday.com to help you track cals.



Does the fact that I have a high metabolism mean that I require more calories?

Yes:)



Also, how important are the sources of calories? My diet consists of a couple of protein shakes a day (plus a protein drink, on days when I workout), a 1215 calorie chicken pie (spread out over two sittings - it comes as a convenient source of calories, but does have a reasonably high fat content, and doesn't provide as much protein as you might expect for 1215 calories), a banana, 200g of pasta plus maybe 200g of chicken, as well as some Shredded Wheat. How does this sound? I am aware that I don't eat much in the way of vegetables.......I also get about 100g of fat a day. Is this too high? I get close to 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight a day. I probably get close to 300g carbs a day.

Any advice/feedback would be much appreciated. [/B]

The source of your calories is not that important as long as you are taking in adequate amounts of protein and essential fatty acids. Protein intake should be ~1g per. lb. of bodyweight, and make sure to include a variety of healthy fats in your diet (fish oil, oily fish, flaxseed oil, nuts, olive oil, natural peanut butter, etc.). I would recommend taking in ~25% of your daily calories from fat, and most of this total should come from healthy sources. Although I think you would decrease the probability of adding bodyfat if you were to consume cleaner more wholesome foods.

If you would like you can post your stats (height, weight, ~bf%), and also your diet. Make sure and include your meals and what time you are consuming them, and also what time you train.

Maccer101
08-22-2003, 06:30 AM
I would suggest that you get most of you protein from real food, protein shakes are very good postworkout but at all other times real food is King. Dump eating the pies, readymade food contains all the wrong types of Carbs & fats and generally has way too much salt in it. Rice, Oats, Cereals, pasta, potatoes etc. for carbs. Make sure you get your protein from a range of sources to ensure you get all the essential amino acids, meat, fish, eggs, and a pint of milk a day ensures you get plenty of calcium since high protein diets restrict calcium absorption (or is it increase calciun excreation?)