PDA

View Full Version : microwave safe?



frankm007
08-31-2003, 05:29 PM
test?

bradley
08-31-2003, 05:40 PM
I don't see any problem with it, and I do it quite often.:)

Wizard
08-31-2003, 07:21 PM
Make sure there are no cold spots in food where bacteria can survive.(especially salmonela in chicken).
Then, allow the microwaved food to stand for a few minutes after cooking so that the heat is distributed and the food is cooked evenly.

mikey4402
08-31-2003, 08:35 PM
i do this all the time, but i thought that when you microwave things they DO lose nutrients. is this true?

bradley
09-01-2003, 02:59 AM
Originally posted by frankm007
see, thats why i asked... heat tends to break apart protein eh?

It really does not matter, seeing as how the protein will be broken down into amino acids in the stomach.

bradley
09-01-2003, 03:00 AM
Originally posted by Wizard
Make sure there are no cold spots in food where bacteria can survive.(especially salmonela in chicken).
Then, allow the microwaved food to stand for a few minutes after cooking so that the heat is distributed and the food is cooked evenly.

This would not be a concern if the food was already cooked and you were just re-heating it in the microwave, but if you were actually cooking the food in the microwave, then yes you bring up some good points.

bradley
09-01-2003, 03:11 AM
Originally posted by mikey4402
i do this all the time, but i thought that when you microwave things they DO lose nutrients. is this true?

***In general, when you cook anything you should expect some nutrient losses, especially in reference to vegetables. Eating raw meat is usually not very practical.:)

Retention of nutrients in microwave-cooked foods.

Klein BP.

The high market penetration of microwave ovens in the United States and the burst of new food products available for "heating and eating" raises questions about the nutritional impact of the relatively new technology. Based on the information available in the literature, nutrient content and retention of microwave-cooked or reheated foods is equal to or better than the same product prepared conventionally or held hot in a foodservice operation. Using recommended procedures for microwave cooking and reheating should result in products that are satisfying from both a sensory and nutritional standpoint.

--------------

Effects of microwave cooking/reheating on nutrients and food systems: a review of recent studies.

Hoffman CJ, Zabik ME.

Microwave-oven technology has been improved by the use of low power. With the utilization of low-power techniques, studies showed equal or better retention of nutrients for microwave, as compared with conventional, reheated foods for thiamin, riboflavin, pyridoxine, folacin, and ascorbic acid. Beef roasts microwaved at "simmer" were comparable with conventionally cooked roasts in sensory quality, while vegetables cooked by an institutional (1,150 w) microwave oven were superior to those cooked in a domestic (550 w) microwave oven. Microwave-cooked bacon had lower levels of nitrosamines than conventionally cooked bacon; however, the use of a new alpha-tocopherol coating system has been found to be a safe N-nitrosamine inhibitor regardless of cooking method used.

------------------

The effect of microwaves on nutrient value of foods.

Cross GA, Fung DY.

Microwave cooking has gained considerable importance as an energy-saving, convenient, and time-saving cooking method. This article reviews the state of the art of microwave cooking and the existing publishing data on the effects of microwave cooking on nutritive values of moisture, protein, carbohydrate, lipid, minerals, and vitamins. Most reports indicated that microwave cooking resulted in higher moisture losses compared with conventional methods. Overall, the nutritional effects of microwaves on protein, lipid, and minerals appear minimal. There is no report on the effects of microwaves on carbohydrate fraction in foods. A large amount of data is available on the effects of microwaves on vitamins. It is concluded that there are only slight differences between microwave and conventional cooking on vitamin retention in foods. In conclusion, no significant nutritional differences exist between foods prepared by conventional and microwave methods. Any differences reported in the literature are minimal.

Wizard
09-01-2003, 05:16 PM
I was talking about non cooked food.

Perhaps he is asking whether the biological value of the protein is getting lower by overcooking. The answer is yes.