PDA

View Full Version : 20 cups or more or milk a day =-/



lazyman79
09-17-2003, 01:43 AM
Hey, just added up how much milk a had today. I asked bradley somthing similar to this, but I thought I might get some further input on it. For starters is there anyway to lower the bloating you get from milk. Next I was wondering if I am taking in to much sugar from the milk, two hundred and twenty grams a day just from the milk alone. Do natural sugars such as from the milk have a high impact on blood sugar levels or not at all? Hmmm.. if I have any other questions I will add to this later. Thanks for any input for now though. ;)

bradley
09-17-2003, 02:23 AM
Originally posted by lazyman79
Do natural sugars such as from the milk have a high impact on blood sugar levels or not at all?

Milk is high on the insulin index (II), but low on the glycemic index.


For starters is there anyway to lower the bloating you get from milk.

Decrease your milk intake;)

Along with the sugar you are also taking in quite a bit of sodium just from the milk alone.

dirty-c
09-17-2003, 08:01 AM
Originally posted by bradley
Milk is high on the insulin index (II), but low on the glycemic index

If I understand correctly, the insulin index is approximately a function of the G.I. multiplied by the total grams of carbs. In this case, how is milk high on the insulin index. Also, "high" is a relative term. Is the "insulin index" strongly affected by the portion size? Would it be safe to say that you would have to drink much more milk than grape juice (like 3x or more) to get the same insulin index?

bradley
09-17-2003, 08:24 AM
Originally posted by dirty-c


If I understand correctly, the insulin index is approximately a function of the G.I. multiplied by the total grams of carbs. In this case, how is milk high on the insulin index. Also, "high" is a relative term. Is the "insulin index" strongly affected by the portion size? Would it be safe to say that you would have to drink much more milk than grape juice (like 3x or more) to get the same insulin index?

Glycemic index is a measure of how certain foods affect blood sugar levels, where as the insulin index is used to measure the insulin response to certain foods. The two are usually close (high GI/high II), but this is not always the case and a good example is milk.

The article below has a table that shows insulin index of a variety of foods.
http://www.theministryoffitness.com/mof/library/articles/article18.htm

This was an article posted by doc a while back that will further explain the insulin index.
http://www.zonehome.com/zlib0025.htm

hemants
09-17-2003, 08:35 AM
How much do you weight? You're getting about 180 grams of protein from milk alone. you probably don't need that much.

David
09-17-2003, 08:44 AM
Yeah, but what about the sugar? lol, that's like 220 grams or so.
:eek:

lazyman, do you get your protein from any other sources of food?

Also might want to check out the
Dairy products, estrogen, and testicular cancer (http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?threadid=36940) thread over at general health.

:)

hemants
09-17-2003, 09:48 AM
Lactose is sugar but it is very slow digesting so it's unlikely to make you fat.

lazyman79
09-17-2003, 03:23 PM
Every time I have milk I add a scoop of whey protein to it. I also eat other things like eggs,tuna, breads etc...


Originally posted by TripleP
Yeah, but what about the sugar? lol, that's like 220 grams or so.
:eek:

lazyman, do you get your protein from any other sources of food?

Also might want to check out the
Dairy products, estrogen, and testicular cancer (http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?threadid=36940) thread over at general health.

:)

IronDaddy
09-17-2003, 03:59 PM
Too much of just about anything is not good for you and frankly that is just waaaaay too much. I'd cut back a lot if I were you.

raniali
09-17-2003, 04:11 PM
why has no one mentioned kidney stones??? if there is any predisposition to them, you are really running a great risk with this much dairy.

Spartacus
09-17-2003, 04:38 PM
Originally posted by raniali
why has no one mentioned kidney stones??? if there is any predisposition to them, you are really running a great risk with this much dairy.

actually dairy is a good thing if you are at risk for kidney stones; supplemental calcium is what puts you at risk.

Comparison of dietary calcium with supplemental calcium and other nutrients as factors affecting the risk for kidney stones in women.

Curhan GC, Willett WC, Speizer FE, Spiegelman D, Stampfer MJ.

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

BACKGROUND: Calcium intake is believed to play an important role in the formation of kidney stones, but data on the risk factors for stone formation in women are limited. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between intake of dietary and supplemental calcium and the risk for kidney stones in women. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with 12-year follow-up. SETTING: Several U.S. states. PARTICIPANTS: 91,731 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study I who were 34 to 59 years of age in 1980 and had no history of kidney stones. MEASUREMENTS: Self-administered food-frequency questionnaires were used to assess diet in 1980, 1984, 1986, and 1990. The main outcome measure was incident symptomatic kidney stones. RESULTS: During 903,849 person-years of follow-up, 864 cases of kidney stones were documented. After adjustment for potential risk factors, intake of dietary calcium was inversely associated with risk for kidney stones and intake of supplemental calcium was positively associated with risk. The relative risk for stone formation in women in the highest quintile of dietary calcium intake compared with women in the lowest quintile was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.50 to 0.83). The relative risk in women who took supplemental calcium compared with women who did not was 1.20 (CI, 1.02 to 1.41). In 67% of women who took supplemental calcium, the calcium either was not consumed with a meal or was consumed with meals whose oxalate content was probably low. Other dietary factors showed the following relative risks among women in the highest quintile of intake compared with those in the lowest quintile: sucrose, 1.52 (CI, 1.18 to 1.96); sodium, 1.30 (CI, 1.05 to 1.62); fluid, 0.61 (CI, 0.48 to 0.78); and potassium, 0.65 (CI, 0.51 to 0.84). CONCLUSIONS: High intake of dietary calcium appears to decrease risk for symptomatic kidney stones, whereas intake of supplemental calcium may increase risk. Because dietary calcium reduces the absorption of oxalate, the apparently different effects caused by the type of calcium may be associated with the timing of calcium ingestion relative to the amount of oxalate consumed. However, other factors present in dairy products (the major source of dietary calcium) could be responsible for the decreased risk seen with dietary calcium.

PMID: 9092314 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

bradley
09-17-2003, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by raniali
why has no one mentioned kidney stones??? if there is any predisposition to them, you are really running a great risk with this much dairy.

If he is drinking ~20 cups of milk a day, that would equal roughly 4.5g of calcium per day, but calcium needs would also be increased. Do you think there is really a significant cause for concern of kidney stones?