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Giddo
09-29-2003, 05:17 AM
Does the amount of carbs i intake per dayl matter if they are from a good source such as brown rice or wholewheat pasta? I take about 220g of protien a day, I'm 6' and 218lb.

bradley
09-29-2003, 05:28 AM
Originally posted by Giddo
Does the amount of carbs i intake per dayl matter if they are from a good source such as brown rice or wholewheat pasta? I take about 220g of protien a day, I'm 6' and 218lb.

Total calories will be more important in terms of weight loss/weight gain, assuming that you are taking in adequate amounts of protein and essential fatty acids.

Giddo
09-29-2003, 05:37 AM
I want to gain muscle but being my own worst enemy want to stay lean, I get my protien from eggs, fish, poultry, dairy and veg but try to restrict my carb intake except from fruit, veg and wholegrains.

bradley
09-29-2003, 05:43 AM
Originally posted by Giddo
I want to gain muscle but being my own worst enemy want to stay lean, I get my protien from eggs, fish, poultry, dairy and veg but try to restrict my carb intake except from fruit, veg and wholegrains.

Well you should expect some fat gain when trying to add LBM, but if you concentrate on adding a small amount of weight each week, you should be able to minimize bf gains.

The food choices that you mention above sound fine, although I think high GI carbs centered around your training would be beneficial, and stick with low GI carbs at other times throughout the day.

Giddo
09-29-2003, 05:48 AM
Thanks Bradley that's very helpfull:thumbup:

ace dogg
09-29-2003, 11:32 PM
yes it matters.

JuniorMint6669
09-30-2003, 12:23 AM
Originally posted by ace dogg
yes it matters.

Could you please elaborate? :)

jinxx
09-30-2003, 12:49 AM
When people start cutting carbs are usually the first thing that go.

ace dogg
10-01-2003, 01:24 PM
You still have to limit your carbs even if they are from "good" sources. It all ends up as glucose in the end, and there's only so many places it can go before its stored as fat. Tho you'd be better off, taking in complex glucose based carbs (grains and such, not fruit or dairy) because they can be used for more things. They can go to liver glycogen stores (bout 100g, and empty after a good nights sleep), muscle glycogen (always at least partially full unless in ketosis) which is on average about 300-400g, tho it can be as much as 700g under special conditions, and then of course basic energy needs...then it goes to fat. While a fructose based carb doesn't give you the convenience of the 350g of storage, as it goes preferentially goes to the liver, and if the liver is full, to fat. much lower tolerence.

Either way tho, there's only so much you can use or store before it going to fat. regardless of how "good" of a carb you're eating.

aka23
10-01-2003, 02:16 PM
Originally posted by ace dogg
You still have to limit your carbs even if they are from "good" sources. It all ends up as glucose in the end, and there's only so many places it can go before its stored as fat. ...

Either way tho, there's only so much you can use or store before it going to fat. regardless of how "good" of a carb you're eating.

The body does not convert significant amounts of carbs to fat, excluding certain unusual situations (very low fat diet, very high fructose/sucrose consumption, medical conditions, ...). The study at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8675642&dopt=Abstract found that when subjects ate a diet with a 50% caloric surplus of carbohydrates, less than 5g of fat per day was created via DNL (converting carbs or protein to fat).

The body burns a mixture of fat and carbs (glycogen/glucose) all day and while resting. During low intensity activities, fat is usually the primary fuel source. As intensity increases, more glucose/glycogen is used. Instead of converting carbs to fat, the body likes to save energy and change its fuel mix to burn more carbs (glucose/glycogen) and less fat. In this way caloric balance over a long period becomes a much more important factor in fat balance than macronutrient ratios or carb restriction.

donescobar2000
10-01-2003, 03:26 PM
I totally agree with you bro.

ace dogg
10-01-2003, 06:20 PM
As I said, the body has the storage capacity of 450g. That's a lot of carbs before any of it is going to fat. Tho the actual number is less cuz muscle glycogen is never actually empty unless in ketosis. The question was if you eat "quality" carbs (no candy, sugar, and stuff) will it still make you gain fat. The answer is yes, if you surpass those storages. And i just pointed out that fructose has a hell of a lot lower storage capacity so in that case it would make a diff.

But yeah, if calories are not above maintenace then you'll be fine. which is basically what you're post said. that wasn't the question tho.

galileo
10-01-2003, 06:47 PM
Where did you come up with 450g as the body's capacity for carbs?

donescobar2000
10-01-2003, 07:29 PM
I found this. I don't know if this means anything.

http://www.diabetesnet.com/diabetes_control_tips/500rule.php

galileo
10-01-2003, 07:46 PM
Not unless we're all insulin depedent diabetics.

aka23
10-01-2003, 08:18 PM
Originally posted by ace dogg
But yeah, if calories are not above maintenace then you'll be fine. which is basically what you're post said. that wasn't the question tho.

The study I linked involved a caloric surplus. For 5 days the subjects overfed 50% of their energy requirement by adding carbs to their diet. Even under such extreme conditions, less than 5g of carbs per day was converted to fat. This does not mean that the sujects did not gain body fat. Fat burning slowed down and carb/glycogen burning increased so that more fat was stored than burned. In this way a caloric surplus of carbs increases body fat without filling up glycogen stores and without converting carbs to fat.

It is possible for the glyogen stores to fill up, but this requires very extreme conditions. Acheson did a carbohydrate overfeeding expeirment where the subjects started at ~3600 calories and increased progressively to ~5000 calories over the course of 7 days. Before a significant amount of carb to fat conversion occurred, glycogen storage increased to an average of 810 grams over the usual ~500 grams (bodybuilders have larger glygogen storage capacity than average persons). Acheson concluded that the body can handle periodic loads of 2000 calories of overfeeding carbs without significant conversion to fat and to maintain continued conversion of fat, one must continue to massively overfeed carbs, like they did in the study.

All of this makes little differnce since few people would follow such a diet, and continued overfeeding of any macronutrient will result in fat gain.