PDA

View Full Version : HIIT, using weights.



AJ_11
10-04-2003, 01:37 PM
Okay I am looking to do a less then traditional way of HIIT. Basicially incorporate things like push ups, sit up Jumping jacks, skip rope in a routine that will not cause overtraining.

I am going to be doing a 3 day spit, focusing on compounds. Then on off days I want to prime the muscles, or would it be better to do it before. Here is an example of what I am talking about.

Say Monday is leg/shoulder day - I would be doing some squats, power cleans. Would it be better to do some form of HItt traing before to get some blood flowing or after.

So either sunday or tues, I would do some quad, ham, calf, and a little shoulder work all at lighter weights with a higer rep range.

Sunday or Tues:

Quad machine: 50% max -15 reps, rest
Ham machine: Same
....................
Upward row:
lateral raises:
...............
Abs

Then on Monday, I would do 5 sets of 5 reps of heavy squat work, and power clean.

Would this be to much or even overtraing. I am just bored of Sprints and such, and love weights.

Thanks for the info.

PowerManDL
10-04-2003, 05:18 PM
That's a poor choice for weight-based cardio.

At the minimum you should be using barbell compound movements and/or Olympic lifts.

AJ_11
10-05-2003, 03:02 AM
So what do you suggest as a good routine?

reloaded
10-05-2003, 04:35 PM
id say train the main muscles first before doing HIIT. then do HIIT afterward...its more efficient that way in terms of burning carbs vs. burning fat.

edd91
10-07-2003, 07:55 PM
Originally posted by reloaded
id say train the main muscles first before doing HIIT. then do HIIT afterward...its more efficient that way in terms of burning carbs vs. burning fat.

how is it, its more efficient in burning muscle

AJ_11
10-07-2003, 08:13 PM
Originally posted by reloaded
id say train the main muscles first before doing HIIT. then do HIIT afterward...its more efficient that way in terms of burning carbs vs. burning fat.

I am not talki9ng aboput cardio and weights on the same day. My main concern is not to overtrain, but to spice up some HIIT training, incorporating weights instead of wind sprints.

Dedicated
10-08-2003, 06:26 AM
Originally posted by PowerManDL

At the minimum you should be using barbell compound movements and/or Olympic lifts.
Thats what I do. Usually a few times a week using high rep deadlifts, chinups, pullups with little rest between sets or supersets etc etc...

Dedicated
10-08-2003, 06:30 AM
Originally posted by AJ_11


I am not talki9ng aboput cardio and weights on the same day. My main concern is not to overtrain, but to spice up some HIIT training, incorporating weights instead of wind sprints.
Not sure what your split looks like but my split is upperbody, lowerbody. So If I do it on upperbody day I just make sure to focus on compounds that target the upperbody, if I do it on lowerbody day I might do high rep lunges or squats with short rests between sets and/or supersets etc... This keeps me from working upperbody 2 days in row or lowerbody 2 days in a row.

geoffgarcia
10-08-2003, 09:45 AM
HIIT is all about intensity...u need to get ur heart rate over 165 to get any benefit.
u think you can get your heart rate over 130 doing pushups, skipping rope and doing jumping jacks?

speed and intensity are not synonyms

PowerManDL
10-08-2003, 11:57 AM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia
u think you can get your heart rate over 130 doing pushups, skipping rope and doing jumping jacks?

I nominate this for Dumbass Statement of the Year.

geoffgarcia
10-08-2003, 12:04 PM
its a question, not a statement.
regardless, what makes it "dumbass"?

PowerManDL
10-08-2003, 12:14 PM
Apologize if I took that out of context; it sounded like you were stating it as fact.

However, you can most assuredly raise your heart rate quite extremely doing weight training. If you don't believe it, go do a set of deadlifts for 12 reps, wait 20 seconds, and do it again.

geoffgarcia
10-08-2003, 12:20 PM
yeah I know, I do deadlifts in my HST, just finished doing 200 for 2 sets of 15 on my max day. I know all about how they can jack up ur heart rate.

however, AJ says he plans to do pushups, skip rope, and jumping jacks as his HIIT routine...thats what I was referring to. I just dont think its possible to get enough intensity out of those things to be considered HIIT


Originally posted by AJ_11
Okay I am looking to do a less then traditional way of HIIT. Basicially incorporate things like push ups, sit up Jumping jacks, skip rope in a routine that will not cause overtraining.

WillKuenzel
10-08-2003, 12:29 PM
He's saying incorporate into a routine. Not using those alone, unless I'm mistaken. So it could be like deadlifts, skip rope, deadlifts, push-ups. Or have it mistaken that?

PowerManDL
10-08-2003, 02:09 PM
You could very easily.

Explain to me why any of those movements, especially the rope and jumping jacks, would be insufficient.

geoffgarcia
10-08-2003, 03:06 PM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia
AJ says he plans to do pushups, skip rope, and jumping jacks as his HIIT routine...thats what I was referring to. I just dont think its possible to get enough intensity out of those things to be considered HIIT



Originally posted by PowerManDL
You could very easily.

Explain to me why any of those movements, especially the rope and jumping jacks, would be insufficient.


PowerManDL,
I'm sure we both can agree that the desired work interval for HIIT is 15 based on the study which you've posted on another thread (Effect of work and recovery duration on skeletal muscle oxygenation and fuel use during sustained intermittent exercise)

and I'm sure you'll agree with your very own quote on how intense the working section of HIIT should be:
"...just push yourself to the point where you know you can't keep up the intensity for more than a few seconds. You should literally want to be screaming in agony when its time to hit the low-intensity interval."

Now tell me how you'd be "screaming in agony" from jumping rope, doing jumping jacks, or pushups for 15 seconds?

That is why I think those movements would be insufficient for HIIT, I'm suprised you dont agree.

Maybe I'm missing something?

AJ_11
10-08-2003, 04:55 PM
IF HIIT is basicially Ass to your grass intensity then light, You can surely incorporate pushups. My main concern is not to overtrain, and not do running. I am all aboput the intensity but just dislike running. That is why I want to do some pushups, Hit the punch bag, and even incorporate excercise like deadlifts, squats at high rep, low weight, without overtraining.

I training is using compound movents 4-6 rep at full out. That is why on off days I want to do either some form of HIIT weight training without overtraining.

geoffgarcia
10-08-2003, 07:38 PM
AJ_11,
I hear ya bud...
The distance runners where I went to college used to do high intensity interval training (although they never called it that) as a way to fatigue the hell outta their muscles so they could mentally overcome the pain during the races (we were a top 10 D1 track college all 4 years I ran there)

They had a special wall mounted clock that the trainer would set for work/rest intervals and they would rotate around a series of about 10-15 hydrolic machines (frickin awesome to workout on)

I'm sure you could do the same kinda workout with a stop watch

But be sure to switch every set...otherwise overtraining might be an issue...

(PS, I'd suck it up and run if I were you)

geoffgarcia
10-10-2003, 08:54 AM
PowerManDL, have we given up on this debate?
I'd like to be corrected if I'm wrong

PowerManDL
10-10-2003, 10:19 AM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia
PowerManDL,
I'm sure we both can agree that the desired work interval for HIIT is 15 based on the study which you've posted on another thread (Effect of work and recovery duration on skeletal muscle oxygenation and fuel use during sustained intermittent exercise)

I don't know why everyone wants to take that information and extract some definitive number from it. There's not one. The desired interval is whatever fatigues you sufficiently.


and I'm sure you'll agree with your very own quote on how intense the working section of HIIT should be:
"...just push yourself to the point where you know you can't keep up the intensity for more than a few seconds. You should literally want to be screaming in agony when its time to hit the low-intensity interval."

Now tell me how you'd be "screaming in agony" from jumping rope, doing jumping jacks, or pushups for 15 seconds?

See above. Either of those movements can, on their own accord, used with sufficiently short rest intervals, or in a circuit fashion, achieve the effect.

geoffgarcia
10-10-2003, 10:29 AM
Originally posted by PowerManDL
I don't know why everyone wants to take that information and extract some definitive number from it. There's not one. The desired interval is whatever fatigues you sufficiently.

it seemed rather definitive to me...I will reread it


Originally posted by PowerManDL
Either of those movements can, on their own accord, used with sufficiently short rest intervals, or in a circuit fashion, achieve the effect.
I can see how the final work interval of pushups will be 10x harder than the first...but my understanding of HIIT is that each interval should be of equal physcial intensity and equal duration.

I'm not trying to flame you and I'm not trying to get off the inital subject, I think this debate gets to the heart of AJ's question, plus I'm still redeeming myself from being dumbass of the year *LOL*

PowerManDL
10-10-2003, 02:15 PM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia

I can see how the final work interval of pushups will be 10x harder than the first...but my understanding of HIIT is that each interval should be of equal physcial intensity and equal duration.

There's absolutely no reason at all why the intervals have to be equal.

unshift
10-10-2003, 02:28 PM
how can they be equal?

you're gonna be a hell of a lot more tired on your last set than your first set, especially if you're going ALL OUT like you're supposed to

geoffgarcia
10-10-2003, 03:35 PM
unshift,
equal in intensity....

PowerManDL, any studies on that either way?

PowerManDL
10-10-2003, 04:26 PM
Its basic biochemistry.

geoffgarcia
10-15-2003, 08:31 AM
thanks for the explanation...that clears everything up...

:rolleyes: