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View Full Version : So what happens if cut with only carbs and fat?



Raj
10-05-2003, 11:29 PM
I would like to try this and see what the net result is. No. of calories taken in will be weight x 12. Carbs and Fat will be around 80% in all. Workout will be the same.....6 days a week 2 muscle groups a week. One thing is sure that I will lose weight...and ofcourse muscle but how bad is it? I heard runners take very limited amount of protein and their stamina is very reliable right? So what happens in this case? Has anybody tried this out?

Thanks

Raj

jinxx
10-06-2003, 01:58 AM
I think you'll loose a lot of muscle.

bradley
10-06-2003, 02:18 AM
Originally posted by Raj
I would like to try this and see what the net result is. No. of calories taken in will be weight x 12. Carbs and Fat will be around 80% in all. Workout will be the same.....6 days a week 2 muscle groups a week. One thing is sure that I will lose weight...and ofcourse muscle but how bad is it?

20% of your daily cals from protein would probably be close to a sufficient amount of protein, but this would depend on overall calorie intake. Another thing to consider is that carbs are protein sparing themselves, so if you are taking in a higher amount of carbohydrates your protein needs would be decreased. There are many other factors that would contribute to your protein needs, as indicated below. Although if protein intake is too low, the body will be forced to catabolize muscle tissue, but there would be no way to tell exactly how much muscle you would lose and if any at all.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1895363&dopt=Abstract
"Although definitive dietary recommendations for various athletic groups must await future study, the weight of current evidence suggests that strength or speed athletes should consume about 1.2-1.7 g protein/kg body weight.d-1 (approximately 100-212% of current recommendations) and endurance athletes about 1.2-1.4 g/kg.d-1 (approximately 100-175% of current recommendations). These quantities of protein can be obtained from a diet which consists of 12-15% energy from protein, unless total energy intake is insufficient."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11023001&dopt=Abstract
"Based on laboratory measures, daily protein requirements are increased by perhaps as much as 100% vs. recommendations for sedentary individuals (1.6-1.8 vs. 0.8 g/kg). Yet even these intakes are much less than those reported by most athletes. This may mean that actual requirements are below what is needed to optimize athletic performance, and so the debate continues. Numerous interacting factors including energy intake, carbohydrate availability, exercise intensity, duration and type, dietary protein quality, training history, gender, age, timing of nutrient intake and the like make this topic extremely complex."




I heard runners take very limited amount of protein and their stamina is very reliable right? So what happens in this case? Has anybody tried this out?

According to the study below, runners would be more likely to use energy from amino acids as compared to weightlifters, but unless your goals are to be an edurance runner I don't think it would be a fair comparison (runner vs. weightlifter).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2690267&dopt=Abstract
"Amino acid catabolism has been estimated to contribute between 5 and 15% of the energy required during endurance exercise. Definitive conclusions regarding the changes that occur in protein synthesis and protein degradation during weightlifting exercise must await further research. The net contribution of amino acids to the energy required during weightlifting exercise is unknown but, due to the anaerobic nature of the event, it is most likely less than during endurance exercise. "

Raj
10-06-2003, 04:59 AM
so bradley, is it too much of a risk to try this type of a diet?

hemants
10-06-2003, 06:50 AM
FYI Mike Mentzer, Bill Pearl both advocated 60/20/20 diets (carbs, protein, fat). Seemed to work for them.

Raj
10-06-2003, 07:51 AM
Hmm...Then I think I'm surely going ahead with this one. If there is one proven case , then methinks it is good enuff for a trial:D

bradley
10-06-2003, 09:07 AM
Originally posted by Raj
so bradley, is it too much of a risk to try this type of a diet?

I think it would work just fine, and concentrating on slow digesting proteins would probably be a better choice, as compared to whey. Maybe go with a blend or (casein+whey), or stick with whole food protein sources. Make sure and take in some protein around your training and before bed, then space the remaining amount evenly throughout the day.

Also when you say 80% of your calories are coming from carbs+fat, what percentage will each macro nutrient make up?