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View Full Version : Cardio...in the mornin'!



satinjatin
10-15-2003, 10:57 AM
I've read that doing cardio on an empty stomach is very good for burning fat...because youre essentially burning stored fat instead of carbs. My question is - how will doing cardio in the morning effect lean muscle mass? Are you more likely to burn muscle on an empty stomach? that would suck...someone help me out

Also, how accurate are the calorimeters on cardio equipment (ellipticals, steppers, etc.)? I can do the elliptical machine for 45 mins w/o becoming that tired (although I usually sweat up a storm) and I'm surprised every time when the machine reads that I've burned 750+ cals.

Thanks in advance...

Saint Patrick
10-15-2003, 12:58 PM
Cardio in the morning before eating will put you in a very catabolic state, and you're almost guaranteed to lose some LBM along with the fat. Do a search for "Morning Cardio" - there's several threads on it here.

bradley
10-15-2003, 01:16 PM
Originally posted by satinjatin
I've read that doing cardio on an empty stomach is very good for burning fat...because youre essentially burning stored fat instead of carbs. My question is - how will doing cardio in the morning effect lean muscle mass? Are you more likely to burn muscle on an empty stomach? that would suck...someone help me out

I really do not see the advantage of performing cardio first thing in the morning on an empty stomach. Sure you might mobilze a little more fat, but the increased risk of muscle catabolism outweighs the benefits IMO. I would recommed taking in a small amount of calories (whey+carbs or whey) and then perform your cardio. You are still going to be burning calories whether or not you consume a shake or not, so I think it is only practical to try and make sure that you do not catabolize any muscle tissue.

Also I have found that intensity tends to suffer when trying to perform cardio on an empty stomach, which would be another advantage to taking in a small amount of calories.




Also, how accurate are the calorimeters on cardio equipment (ellipticals, steppers, etc.)? I can do the elliptical machine for 45 mins w/o becoming that tired (although I usually sweat up a storm) and I'm surprised every time when the machine reads that I've burned 750+ cals.

Thanks in advance...

I usually do not put much stock in the calories burned readout on the various cardio machines. I just gauge my progress week by week, and adjust as necessary, instead of trying to determine the number of calories burned over the course of the day. What I mean by that is, if you find you are losing weight too fast, then either decrease the amount or duration of your cardio or increase calorie intake.

mstar
10-15-2003, 02:57 PM
what about taking glutemine? that prevents u going catabolic, cnt u take that instead of lots of cals? or even day before take sone gultimine

bradley
10-15-2003, 04:22 PM
Originally posted by mstar
what about taking glutemine? that prevents u going catabolic, cnt u take that instead of lots of cals? or even day before take sone gultimine

It might help somewhat, but from what I have read and studies that I have seen it is not going to offer much benefit, as far as preventing muscle catabolism, unless you are a burn victim. If you were to take enough glutamine it would help, but it would not offer much benefit over taking in a small amount of whey or whey+carbs.

If you are looking for a low calorie anti-catabolic pre-workout shake, then I would recommend BCAAs which would be much more useful as opposed to glutamine. There are plenty of studies showing the anti-catabolic actions of BCAAS, not to mention other benefits associated with BCAA supplementation.

bradley
10-15-2003, 04:42 PM
I know this study is not in reference to endurance/cardio training, but I found it interesting.
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Effect of glutamine supplementation combined with resistance training in young adults.

Candow DG, Chilibeck PD, Burke DG, Davison KS, Smith-Palmer T.

College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of oral glutamine supplementation combined with resistance training in young adults. A group of 31 subjects, aged 18-24 years, were randomly allocated to groups (double blind) to receive either glutamine (0.9 g x kg lean tissue mass(-1) x day(-1); n = 17) or a placebo (0.9 g maltodextrin x kg lean tissue mass(-1) x day(-1); n = 14 during 6 weeks of total body resistance training. Exercises were performed for four to five sets of 6-12 repetitions at intensities ranging from 60% to 90% 1 repetition maximum (1 RM). Before and after training, measurements were taken of 1 RM squat and bench press strength, peak knee extension torque (using an isokinetic dynamometer), lean tissue mass (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) and muscle protein degradation (urinary 3-methylhistidine by high performance liquid chromatography). Repeated measures ANOVA showed that strength, torque, lean tissue mass and 3-methylhistidine increased with training (P < 0.05), with no significant difference between groups. Both groups increased their 1 RM squat by approximately 30% and 1 RM bench press by approximately 14%. The glutamine group showed increases of 6% for knee extension torque, 2% for lean tissue mass and 41% for urinary levels of 3-methylhistidine. The placebo group increased knee extension torque by 5%, lean tissue mass by 1.7% and 3-methylhistidine by 56%. We conclude that glutamine supplementation during resistance training has no significant effect on muscle performance, body composition or muscle protein degradation in young healthy adults.

bradley
10-15-2003, 04:48 PM
BCAA intake affects protein metabolism in muscle after but not during exercise in humans.

Blomstrand E, Saltin B.

Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre, Rigshospitalet, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. eva.blomstrand@ihs.se

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) or a placebo was given to seven subjects during 1 h of ergometer cycle exercise and a 2-h recovery period. Intake of BCAA did not influence the rate of exchange of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine, in the legs during exercise or the increase in their concentration in muscle. The increase was approximately 30% in both conditions. On the other hand, in the recovery period after exercise, a faster decrease in the muscle concentration of aromatic amino acids was found in the BCAA experiment (46% compared with 25% in the placebo condition). There was also a tendency to a smaller release (an average of 32%) of these amino acids from the legs during the 2-h recovery. The results suggest that BCAA have a protein-sparing effect during the recovery after exercise, either that protein synthesis has been stimulated and/or protein degradation has decreased, but the data during exercise are too variable to make any conclusions about the effects during exercise. The effect in the recovery period does not seem to be mediated by insulin.
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Effects of branched-chain amino acid supplementation on serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase after prolonged exercise.

Coombes JS, McNaughton LR.

Centre for Human Movement, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia. Jeff.Coombes@utas.edu.au

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on serum indicators of muscle damage after prolonged exercise. We hypothesized that BCAA supplementation would reduce the serum activities of intramuscular enzymes associated with muscle damage. METHODS: To test this hypothesis, sixteen male subjects were assigned to one of two groups: the supplemental group (consuming 12 g x d(-1) BCAA for 14 d in addition to their normal diet) or the control group (normal diet only). Baseline serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), shown to be accurate indicators of muscle damage, were determined during the week before the exercise test. The exercise test was administered on day seven and required the subjects to cycle for 120 min on an ergometer at approximately 70% VO2max. Blood samples were taken prior to and immediately following exercise and at 1 hr, 2 hrs, 3 hrs, 4 hrs, 1 d, 3 d, 5 d and 7 d postexercise. All subjects were required have their diets analyzed daily during the 14 d. RESULTS: Dietary analyses indicated that all subjects consumed the recommended daily intake of BCAA (0.64 g x kg(-1)) in their normal diets. Baseline serum values for CK and LDH were not different between groups in the 7 d prior to the test (p>0.05). However there were significant increases (p<0.05) between the pre-exercise and postexercise values for LDH and CK until 5 d postexercise test. Importantly, the BCAA supplementation significantly reduced this change in LDH from 2hrs to 5 d posttest, and CK from 4 hrs to 5 d post-test (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that supplementary BCAA decreased serum concentrations of the intramuscular enzymes CK and LDH following prolonged exercise, even when the recommended intake of BCAA was being consumed. This observation suggests that BCAA supplementation may reduce the muscle damage associated with endurance exercise.

mstar
10-16-2003, 03:46 AM
hehe great info bradley, i have (since u advised elsewhere on this board) i agree with you that whey 30 mins BEFORE morning cardio is most beneficial as i dnt want to break down the muscle i worked so hard to gain! :)

Great Post Bradley (again) :bow:

oh and one last thing...any ideas on the DURATION of cardio? AST - MAX-OT training reccomend cardio (on empty stomuch) for 16 mins NO MORE!! as a good time for good cardio workout minimising muscle loss due to little time as possible

whats peoples thoughts on this :)

bradley
10-16-2003, 05:26 AM
Originally posted by mstar
oh and one last thing...any ideas on the DURATION of cardio? AST - MAX-OT training reccomend cardio (on empty stomuch) for 16 mins NO MORE!! as a good time for good cardio workout minimising muscle loss due to little time as possible

whats peoples thoughts on this :)

It would depend on the intensity of the cardio. If you were performing HIIT cardio then you could go with shorter duration, but if performing low/moderate intensity I would go with longer duration.

Max-OT advocates HIIT cardio, if I am not mistaken, so 16 minutes sounds about right, not including warm up and cool down.

mstar
10-16-2003, 08:53 AM
Originally posted by bradley


It would depend on the intensity of the cardio. If you were performing HIIT cardio then you could go with shorter duration, but if performing low/moderate intensity I would go with longer duration.

Max-OT advocates HIIT cardio, if I am not mistaken, so 16 minutes sounds about right, not including warm up and cool down.


yes they use HIIT cardio, so there method on a empty stomuch would be better bradley if u believed in empty stomuch cardio? (duration being low 16 mins)

bradley
10-16-2003, 12:57 PM
Originally posted by mstar



yes they use HIIT cardio, so there method on a empty stomuch would be better bradley if u believed in empty stomuch cardio? (duration being low 16 mins)

I think a combination of HIIT and low/moderate intensity cardio would be the best approach, but I do not advocate cardio on an empty stomach. I would probably alternate between HIIT and low/moderate intensity cardio, the main reason being not to overtrain the legs and allow ample time for recovery.