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View Full Version : Can you build muscle without complex carbs???



KaiX
10-18-2003, 08:20 AM
I have a GI disorder and complex carbs are a nono, no rice, pasta, potatoes or bread products. Will it still be possible for me to build muscle?
I can eat all the protein i want, meat, eggs, fish but will the excess protein go to waste or do the job of the missing carbs?
I would be very grateful for any advice.:cry:

Silverback
10-18-2003, 08:38 AM
What about oats?

You could always take malto-dextrin, which is classed as a complex carb but high GI.

Sounds like you are deemed to atkins/keto whereupon you could gain decent mass without the carbs, but i personally wouldnt like to do it. And i dont like the idea of too much protein/fat especially concerning the heart and kidneys.

AlexBBbegginer
10-18-2003, 08:44 AM
go see a sports nutritionalist for some safe advice, we all mean well on this board but i doubt any of us will be able to safely advise you if you have such a disorder. Bradley is great on nutrition (something of a legend) so he might know different, but i definately would seek proffesional advice in your case.

I would have thought it was possible tho, so good luck to you

KaiX
10-18-2003, 09:07 AM
Following this diet isn't too much of a problem but finding a sports nutritionist would be, I'm a UK guy working in China and am not too flash at the lingo yet! I was just wondering about the value of a higher, more regular intake of simpler carbs over the complex. Oats are out. Thanks for any advice, I am recieving a lot for my gut problem but am interested in maintaining muscle and possibly building.

bradley
10-18-2003, 01:16 PM
Originally posted by KaiX
I was just wondering about the value of a higher, more regular intake of simpler carbs over the complex. Oats are out. Thanks for any advice, I am recieving a lot for my gut problem but am interested in maintaining muscle and possibly building.

If you can still take in simple carbs then that would work fine, but just don't go overboard on the fructose, which would mean sticking to mainly glucose.

Just combine the simple carbs with protein and/or fat to help slow the rate of gastric emptying, and therefore slow the absorption of the simple carbs. Post workout a fast absorbing carb source would be ideal, so I would stick with protein+carbs while keeping fat to a minimum.


I have a GI disorder and complex carbs are a nono, no rice, pasta, potatoes or bread products.

Do you have a problem breaking down complex carbs into simple sugars, and if so what is the name of the disorder?

KaiX
10-18-2003, 04:39 PM
I have ulcerative colitis which affects the large intestine. I have been reading about the Specific Carbohydrate Diet which is aimed at robbing the large intestine of any undigested food so as not to feed the bacteria causing the problem therein.

bradley
10-18-2003, 04:46 PM
Originally posted by KaiX
I have ulcerative colitis which affects the large intestine. I have been reading about the Specific Carbohydrate Diet which is aimed at robbing the large intestine of any undigested food so as not to feed the bacteria causing the problem therein.

The main point of the diet being the elimination of fiber? Would this also include eliminating carbs with trace amounts of carbs?

KaiX
10-18-2003, 05:09 PM
The main point of it being the elimination of food that is digested late in the GI so no remnants can pass into the large intestine. No rice, no bread products, no pasta, limited dairy, no potatoes, nothing grainy or high in starch.

KaiX
10-18-2003, 05:12 PM
sorry...and refined sugar isn't good either, honey is though.

bradley
10-19-2003, 04:00 AM
I should have said eliminating foods with trace amounts of fiber, but you answered my question with your post.:)

Honey is roughly 50/50 glucose/fructose, so I would just not take in too much fructose over the course of the day.

I would just add a little glucose powder (dextrose) in with some of my meals, which would provide you with a good carb source, but when ingested with other macronutrients (protein+fat) will be absorbed at a slower rate. Sounds like this would fit within the parameters of the diet.

Do you take any medication to control inflammation? Fish oil might also help in controlling inflammation, and it certainly has other beneficial effects.

KaiX
10-19-2003, 08:31 AM
Yeah, I've got meds to take every day, supposedly for the rest of my life. I've xhecked and it says dextrose is ok but to make sure the labelling is right as sometimes it can be half glucose half fructose, the latter being bad. Thanks for the suggestion, I'll give it a shot. I previously thought it would be absorbed too quickly and wanted to avoid the highs and lows that simple sugars can cause to your blood sugar level.

bradley
10-19-2003, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by KaiX
Yeah, I've got meds to take every day, supposedly for the rest of my life. I've xhecked and it says dextrose is ok but to make sure the labelling is right as sometimes it can be half glucose half fructose, the latter being bad.

Half glucose half fructose should be labeled as sucrose (table sugar), where as dextrose is pure glucose.

KaiX
10-25-2003, 05:06 PM
Thanks for all your advice. I'm gonna try supplementing my meals with the glucose and see what happens. Cheers.

defcon
10-25-2003, 06:25 PM
Yeah.. brad knows his stuff :) hope it works out for you Kaix, i would not beable to handle that much dextrose tho lol, i find 2 scoops of it with my p/w shake is sweet as hell :P

KaiX
10-26-2003, 01:36 AM
I made that mistake with honey. I'd never really eaten it before so just tipped a load into the first shake. I was buzzing for an hour!