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View Full Version : Cottage Cheese Ore-Workout??



barrelofmonkeys
10-22-2003, 05:23 PM
I was wondering if about 1/2 a cup is cool to eat about 45 minutes prior to my workout? I usually workout in the morning and my pre workout meal is 1 cup oatmeal with 1 slice Whole Wheat Bread and a glass of OJ, now for this entire week my workout will not begin until about 8:00 pm. So would the CC do me right or would it huirt my stomach sine it is dairy?

Mercuryblade
10-22-2003, 08:19 PM
That completely depends on how you handle dairy. My friend is hardcore lifting fitness guy and he drinks milk likes its his job and never has any trouble ,its the lactac acid (which is actually a base,) thats present in dairy that causes digestion problems, so I'd just eat cottage cheese before you lift and see how you feel, then eat something else non dairy before lifting and compare, it's not going to kill you, worse case scenario is that you throw up, and I've only done that once, but I also happen to be lactose intolerant.

Berserker
10-22-2003, 09:09 PM
Personally I can almost anything before a workout and not have it bother my workout.
How much protein are you getting?

barrelofmonkeys
10-22-2003, 09:37 PM
I get a good 225 g a day, I eat alot of whole foods such as Chicken Breast, Lean cuts of Red Meat, Vension, and Fish. I still drink protein shakes as well, But I try and get my protein from meats as much as I can.

bradley
10-23-2003, 02:37 AM
Originally posted by barrelofmonkeys
I was wondering if about 1/2 a cup is cool to eat about 45 minutes prior to my workout? I usually workout in the morning and my pre workout meal is 1 cup oatmeal with 1 slice Whole Wheat Bread and a glass of OJ, now for this entire week my workout will not begin until about 8:00 pm. So would the CC do me right or would it huirt my stomach sine it is dairy?

The cottage cheese would work just fine, assuming you are not lactose intolerant, but I would also throw in a small amount of carbs with the cottage cheese.

barrelofmonkeys
10-23-2003, 08:41 PM
Cool, thanks for the help guys.

theophus
10-27-2003, 02:56 PM
Originally posted by Mercuryblade
its the lactac acid (which is actually a base,) thats present in dairy that causes digestion problems, so I'd just eat cottage cheese before you lift and see how you feel, then eat something else non dairy before lifting and compare, it's not going to kill you, worse case scenario is that you throw up, and I've only done that once, but I also happen to be lactose intolerant.

Actually, it's the lactose in dairy products that causes the problems. People who are lactose intolerant can't digest milk sugar (lactose) because they lack the enzyme to do so. However, the bacteria in the gut can convert some of it, which results in gas as a byproduct.

I can't remember if this is 100% correct or not, but as I recall, yogurt is low in lactose, because most of it is converted by the bacteria cultures that in turn convert milk into yogurt. If you can't stomach the cottage cheese, try yogurt instead.

Shao-LiN
10-27-2003, 05:04 PM
Yah, lactose would be the correct word. Lactic acid is what builds up in your muscles and causes that burning/cramping feeling.

Spartacus
10-27-2003, 06:50 PM
well lactic acid is still in the yoghurt, as the byproduct of the bacteria

theophus
10-28-2003, 06:15 AM
Originally posted by Spartacus
well lactic acid is still in the yoghurt, as the byproduct of the bacteria

Sure, but lactic acid in the diet isn't a significant problem when you're talking about lactose intolerance.

Lactic acid in the muscles, which is theorized to be a cause of muscle soreness after a good workout, is the result of anaerobic metabolism of glycogen in the muscle tissue, the byproduct of which is lactic acid. Simply ingesting lactic acid doesn't cause muscle soreness, or even contribute to it. (I said "theorized" above because there seems to be some debate as to whether or not lactic acid in the muscles actually causes the soreness, or whether it's simply that anaerobic workouts, which are often fueled by anaerobic glycolysis, tend to be more intense, and lead to more muscle damage - and thus, more soreness - than aerobic workouts.)

The energy provided by the metabolism of muscle glycogen does not last long, and so muscle fatigue follows fairly quickly.