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View Full Version : What happens to extra protein?



Jane
09-08-2001, 01:58 PM
I know that this is a really elementary question for most of you, but I would greatly appreciate a simple explanation for some of these scenarios:
For example,

1. a meal of a large veggy salad, little bit of olive oil, huge amounts of grilled chicken, and a little bit of fruit: can the body only take in so much protein at a time? what happens to the extra chicken?

2. a protein shake snack that is very low in carbs but has about 55g of protein: if that is more protein than your body needs will the extra be stored? since there is little carb and fat in this "snack", will the protein not be utilized correctly since the body will have to convert some of the protein into carb for energy?

3. a large meal of vegetable, medium starch portion, and large amount of protein: this is probably too many calories to consume at once, so does the chance of protein being stored as fat increase?

Thanks, guys, sorry to sound simpleminded.
:rolleyes:

PS Basically, I am looking for guidelines to get the max amount of protein out of each meal utilized for muscle and tissue growth, but not to consume too much and have it stored.

chris mason
09-09-2001, 10:29 AM
If you consume more protein than your body needs, and you are consuming more calories than your body requires for maintenance and growth, then then excess will be stored as fat.

the doc
09-09-2001, 11:34 AM
I think it is generally agreed the body can absorb ~50g/meal but this is a highly general statement and can differ greatly depending on the type of food, protion size, length of eating time...etc. COnsider that most meals spend similar times in the digestive tract (if you are regular), and what i am saying is based on this assumption

1. a meal of a large veggy salad, little bit of olive oil, huge amounts of grilled chicken, and a little bit of fruit: can the body only take in so much protein at a time? what happens to the extra chicken?

the fiber will slow adsorbtion due its dilution of protein whilst ensuring regularity. If you eat a large amout of chicken then some will undoubtedly be passed through into the toilet as there is not enough time to digest and adsorb


2. a protein shake snack that is very low in carbs but has about 55g of protein: if that is more protein than your body needs will the extra be stored? since there is little carb and fat in this "snack", will the protein not be utilized correctly since the body will have to convert some of the protein into carb for energy?
well protein is "stored" as lean body tissue (muscles, organs, and other non-fatty tissue). This requires growth via resistance training or equivalent which puts the body in an anabolic state. The protein storage machinery can only handle a small amount at a time

how fast the protein is digested (like whey vs casein) will effect what it is used for. If it is something like whey (fast adsorbtion) then some will undoubtedly be converted to glucose and metabolized for energy. This is why a protein blend is best for all times other than postworkout.


3. a large meal of vegetable, medium starch portion, and large amount of protein: this is probably too many calories to consume at once, so does the chance of protein being stored as fat increase?

how do you know it is to many? Is it post workout? THen it may be good. The comversion of protien to fat is not very efficient and most likely it will be converted to glucose and burned for energy before it is burned as fat
consuming protein and carbs together is not bad. all carbs, regardless of gi, cause the release of insulin stimulaing anabolic activity like digestion/uptake of protein (as amino acids) for protein synthesis
hope this helps

syntekz
09-09-2001, 12:11 PM
This is kind of off topic, but...

If people don't know the amount of protein the body can absorb at a time. Why do so many people say you need this many grams of protein per/lb. I've anywhere from 0.8grams/lb all the way up to 2.0grams/lb.

Doesn't make sense.

Kazuki
09-09-2001, 12:38 PM
It is all hypothetical, in my opinion.

It's just like training. Trial and error. Protein has the least chance of being stored as fat compared to any other macronutrient to my understanding.

Like chris mason said, stay within your caloric limits, and you can eat as much protein as you like. The excess will either be excreted or broken down and used as fuel, as a carbohydrate source would. 50/30/20 is a popular ratio for losing bodyfat, though I would suggest more carbohydrates for gaining new lean tissue.