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paulus
10-31-2003, 07:58 AM
Hi all,

Im a newbie and this is my first post on this forum.

I used to train over 15 years ago while at school but wasnt serious and have trained nothing since then.

I am 5'5 and my starting weight is 56 kg, (around 118 pounds i think) I am 32 years old.

I have been getting in the gym and training hard, to be honest that seems to be the easy bit.

What i am finding incredibly difficult is to eat enough food.

I understand the concept of 6 small meals a day but just find it so hard to keep eating (what seems to me to be all day long) considering that before i was training id get by on one meal and a small snack per day..

Its the time, the shopping, the money, the cooking, the eating... everything..

I really want to bulk up and i know i have to eat, just looking for some tips to help me enjoy eating without it seeming like a chore..

and thanks for the great forum......

donescobar2000
10-31-2003, 08:05 AM
I suggest you just eat bro. That is the only way you are going to grow. You could opt for a weightgainer which usually pack a lot of cals but I would stay away from them since they contain a ****load of SUGAR.*ehhh* Just my 2 cents bro.:)

fender777
10-31-2003, 08:06 AM
Well, one thing you can do is set aside one evening as a cooking night. Cook up a package or two of chicken breasts in whatever manner you want to, then keep them refrigerated and you'll have those ready to heat up (or not) whenever you need food. I can't speak for your grocery store, but a grocery store here also sells a package of cooked, frozen chicken breasts. I used to buy those and heat them up in the microwave. That was a great way to have a chicken breast ready in 3 minutes.

A pot of brown rice will also keep for several days in a sealed container in the fridge. If that isn't convenient for an on-the-go lifestyle, then find some good wheat bread to make sandwiches out of. Keep some other things around that are easy and nutritious, like baby carrots and fresh fruit.

I'm sure others will have some great advice for you as well. Hope that helps!

cphafner
10-31-2003, 08:09 AM
snacks are good. things I eat to help get those extra calories are peanuts, fish oil caps, pbj sandwiches, and cottage cheese and fruit.

Relentless
10-31-2003, 08:10 AM
MRP powders are an easy way to pack in extra calories quickly and with minimal fuss

sure, you can argue back and forth about the benefits and drawbacks of such things but if you're having trouble consuming enough calories, shakes are your friend.

paulus
10-31-2003, 08:12 AM
if i go for a weight gain powder which i am thinking of trying...

is it really that bad that they have so much sugar ??

i konw sugar isnt ideal, but in my situation (trying to bulk up) what is so wrong with a high sugar intake, for a short while ?

is sugar that bad ????

bradley
10-31-2003, 08:12 AM
Originally posted by paulus
I really want to bulk up and i know i have to eat, just looking for some tips to help me enjoy eating without it seeming like a chore..

Just focus on eating calorie dense foods, such as beans, potatoes, natural peanut butter, olive oil, nuts, etc. along with your protein and essential fatty acids.

There is really no need to eat 6 meals per day, but it does make it easier when trying to increase total calories. Another option that helps is to consume liquid calories such as protein shakes, meal replacements, etc. If you were to eat at least 3 whole food meals and then drink a few MRPs you should be well on your way to getting in the calories needed to grow. Also don't forget your post workout shake.:)

Welcome to WBB.

bradley
10-31-2003, 08:16 AM
Originally posted by paulus
if i go for a weight gain powder which i am thinking of trying...

is it really that bad that they have so much sugar ??

i konw sugar isnt ideal, but in my situation (trying to bulk up) what is so wrong with a high sugar intake, for a short while ?

is sugar that bad ????

You can make your own weight gainer using protein powder and a carb source much cheaper than buying a weight gainer. Most weight gainers are simply protein+maltodextrin, both of which can be purchased seperately at a reduced total cost.

If you do decide to use weight gainer that contains a high amount of sugar, I would mix it with milk instead of water to slow digestion.

Sugar is not ideal, but it can be helpful when trying to increase your calories.

fender777
10-31-2003, 08:18 AM
I agree that I also find 6 meals hard to do. Typically I get 4-5. This usually consists of breakfast, lunch, mid-afternoon snack, and dinner on a rest day, or breakfast, post-workout shake, lunch, dinner on workout days. Sometimes between lunch and dinner I get hungry again on workout days, so I'll fit in a 1/4 cup of nuts, or a PB sandwich. I also have a small snack sometimes later in the evening if I get hungry before bed.

I know that eating that frequently takes some getting used to, if you are accustomed to 3 or less meals per day. Keep it up, and remember that your portions don't have to be as big as you might be used to.

Leviathan
11-02-2003, 01:12 PM
Unfortunately, when it comes right down to it you're going to get out what you put in. Sometimes you just gotta suck it up and discipline yourself to eat every 3 hours or so.

I agree with bradley that you should focus on eating calorie dense foods such as potatoes, but it is also important to insure that your ratios of carbs, protein, and fats are in good proportion.

I disagree with bradley on the point that there is really no need to eat 6 meals a day. The problem I have with this is that your body can only process so much food at once. If you space your meals out throughout the day you can keep your body in an anabolic state ideal for muscle growth. I even know of bodybuilders (Jeff Willet for one) that set their alarm for the middle of the night to have an MRP to insure that their body stays in an anabolic state as they sleep. Of course, this is a bit extreme for a casual bodybuilder not looking to compete.

bradley
11-02-2003, 04:31 PM
Originally posted by Leviathan
I disagree with bradley on the point that there is really no need to eat 6 meals a day. The problem I have with this is that your body can only process so much food at once.

Your body is quite effecient at utilizing whatever food you consume, and a larger meal will just sit in the gut longer as compared to a shorter meal. Your body is not going to waste calories, so to speak.




If you space your meals out throughout the day you can keep your body in an anabolic state ideal for muscle growth. I even know of bodybuilders (Jeff Willet for one) that set their alarm for the middle of the night to have an MRP to insure that their body stays in an anabolic state as they sleep. Of course, this is a bit extreme for a casual bodybuilder not looking to compete.

There are studies that show this to not be the case, and the biggest advantage of consuming 6 meals per day is being able to consume more total calories.
===============

Frequency of feeding, weight reduction and energy metabolism.

Verboeket-van de Venne WP, Westerterp KR.

Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of feeding frequency on the rate and composition of weight loss and 24 h energy metabolism in moderately obese women on a 1000 kcal/day diet. During four consecutive weeks fourteen female adults (age 20-58 years, BMI 25.4-34.9 kg/m2) restricted their food intake to 1000 kcal/day. Seven subjects consumed the diet in two meals daily (gorging pattern), the others consumed the diet in three to five meals (nibbling pattern). Body mass and body composition, obtained by deuterium dilution, were measured at the start of the experiment and after two and four weeks of dieting. Sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) was measured at the same time intervals using a respiration chamber. At the end of the experiment 24 h energy expenditure (24 h EE) and diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) were assessed by a 36 h stay in the respiration chamber. There was no significant effect of the feeding frequency on the rate of weight loss, fat mass loss or fat-free mass loss. Furthermore, fat mass and fat-free mass contributed equally to weight loss in subjects on both gorging and nibbling diet. Feeding frequency had no significant effect on SMR after two or four weeks of dieting. The decrease in SMR after four weeks was significantly greater in subjects on the nibbling diet. 24 h EE and DIT were not significantly different between the two feeding regimens
===========

Influence of the feeding frequency on nutrient utilization in man: consequences for energy metabolism.

Verboeket-van de Venne WP, Westerterp KR.

Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

A study was conducted to investigate whether there is a diurnal pattern of nutrient utilization in man and how this is affected by meal frequency to explain possible consequences of meal frequency for body weight regulation. When the daily energy intake is consumed in a small number of large meals, there is an increased chance to become overweight, possibly by an elevated lipogenesis (fat synthesis and accumulation) or storage of energy after the meal. Thirteen subjects, two males and eleven females, were fed to energy balance in two meals per day (gorging pattern) and seven meals per day (nibbling pattern) over 2-day intervals. On the second day on each feeding regimen, the diurnal pattern of nutrient utilization was calculated from simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and urinary nitrogen excretion over 3 h intervals in a respiration chamber. A gorging pattern of energy intake resulted in a stronger diurnal periodicity of nutrient utilization, compared to a nibbling pattern. However, there were no consequences for the total 24 h energy expenditure (24 h EE) of the two feeding patterns (5.57 +/- 0.16 kJ/min for the gorging pattern; 5.44 +/- 0.18 kJ/min for the nibbling pattern). Concerning the periodicity of nutrient utilization, protein oxidation during the day did not change between the two feeding patterns. In the gorging pattern, carbohydrate oxidation was significantly elevated during the interval following the first meal (ie from 1200 h to 1500 h, P less than 0.01) and the second meal (ie from 1800 h to 2100 h, P less than 0.05). The decreased rate of carbohydrate oxidation observed during the fasting period (from rising in the morning until the first meal at 1200 h), was compensated by an increased fat oxidation from 0900 to 1200 h to cover energy needs. In the nibbling pattern, carbohydrate and fat oxidation remained relatively constant during the active hours of the day.

Leviathan
11-02-2003, 05:23 PM
Interesting. Actually, those studies you mentioned were sourced in an article written by T-Mag at:

http://www.t-mag.com/html/body_92getbig.html

Albeit, it seems like what they are saying in the article doesn't match what was said in the study.

Nevertheless, they did reference a study that I was unable to find online that supposedly found that eating frequent small meals rather than a few big meals decreased muscle loss in boxers that were cutting:

Iwao, S., K. Mori, and Y. Sato, Effects of meal frequency on body composition during weight control in boxers. Scand J Med Sci Sports, 1996. 6(5): p. 265-272.

Perhaps you can find this study through your sources and see if it offers any contradictory information.

bradley
11-03-2003, 02:11 AM
Originally posted by Leviathan
Interesting. Actually, those studies you mentioned were sourced in an article written by T-Mag at:

http://www.t-mag.com/html/body_92getbig.html

Albeit, it seems like what they are saying in the article doesn't match what was said in the study.

Nevertheless, they did reference a study that I was unable to find online that supposedly found that eating frequent small meals rather than a few big meals decreased muscle loss in boxers that were cutting:

Iwao, S., K. Mori, and Y. Sato, Effects of meal frequency on body composition during weight control in boxers. Scand J Med Sci Sports, 1996. 6(5): p. 265-272.

Perhaps you can find this study through your sources and see if it offers any contradictory information.

I am familiar with the study, and as you will see from the study it compares consuming 2 vs. 6 meals per day, where as the other studies compared consuming 3 vs. 6 meals per day.

I will agree that consuming only 2 meals per day could be detrimental to your gains.
=============

Effects of meal frequency on body composition during weight control in boxers.

Iwao S, Mori K, Sato Y.

First Division of Health Promotion Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Japan.

The effects of meal frequency on changes in body composition by food restriction were investigated. Twelve boxers were divided between a two meals day-1 group (the 2M group) and a six meals day-1 group (the 6M group). Both groups ingested 5.02 MJ (1200 kcal) day-1 for 2 weeks. Although there was no difference in change of body weight by food restriction between the two groups, the decrease in lean body mass (LBM) was significantly greater in the 2M group than in the 6M group. The decrease in urinary 3-methylhistidine/creatinine was significantly greater in the 6M group than in the 2M group. These results suggest that the lower frequency of meal intake leads to a greater myoprotein catabolism even if the same diet is consumed.

defcon
11-03-2003, 05:04 AM
they only ate 1200 cals? i would hate to perform in that study :P

Budiak
11-03-2003, 09:25 PM
He weighs 118 pounds. I dont think it matters what he eats. In my opinion, if it can fit in his mouth, he should be eating it. If it can't fit in his mouth, thats what biting and tearing is for.

PDawg
11-03-2003, 09:46 PM
Originally posted by Budiak
He weighs 118 pounds. I dont think it matters what he eats. In my opinion, if it can fit in his mouth, he should be eating it. If it can't fit in his mouth, thats what biting and tearing is for.

LMAO ... so you're saying he should be biting and tearing chunks out of stray dogs and cats ?

lol


PDawg
:dj:

defcon
11-04-2003, 05:04 AM
Originally posted by Budiak
He weighs 118 pounds. I dont think it matters what he eats. In my opinion, if it can fit in his mouth, he should be eating it. If it can't fit in his mouth, thats what biting and tearing is for.

:eek:

paulus
11-04-2003, 07:34 AM
thanks for the replies. (started to get a bit technical for me) but my conclusions are;

that i should eat every few hours if i can (as opposed to less often larger meals)

liquids/meal replacement shakes can be counted as a meal

at my weight (118) and the fact that i have just started training and am looking to bulk up i should just eat, eat and then eat some more.

many thanks again for the great forum....

mstar
11-04-2003, 08:34 AM
where does jeff willet say eat during the night?? by setting ur alarm clock :confused: :confused: :confused:

Spartacus
11-04-2003, 10:30 AM
thanks for the replies. (started to get a bit technical for me) but my conclusions are;

that i should eat every few hours if i can (as opposed to less often larger meals)
actually just make sure you eat when you get up and before bed. then just have as many meals in between as you need to get your calories

liquids/meal replacement shakes can be counted as a meal

at my weight (118) and the fact that i have just started training and am looking to bulk up i should just eat, eat and then eat some more.

many thanks again for the great forum....

paulus
11-05-2003, 06:02 AM
when you say "eat before you go to bed" how long before going to bed?

i would have thought going to bed on a full stomach would be a bad thing... am i wrong.

Is there a minimum time i should leave after eating and then sleeping..


thanks

bradley
11-05-2003, 08:23 AM
Originally posted by paulus
when you say "eat before you go to bed" how long before going to bed?

I usually eat within 15 minutes before going to bed.



i would have thought going to bed on a full stomach would be a bad thing... am i wrong.

Is there a minimum time i should leave after eating and then sleeping..

As long as it does not interfere with your sleep you will be fine eating before bed. If you find it hard to sleep on a full stomach or experience GI distress, I would substitue whole food with a shake of some sort.