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goobermor
11-03-2003, 12:23 AM
It's a question I've been asking myself for a while. Are food products tested by a central authority that determines the nutritional facts on the back of a packaging?

Reason I ask is because I am on the Atkins diet (I know people might harp on me for that one, but hey its getting the last bit of fat off me better than any other method I tried), and carb counting is extremely important.

I went into Costco, and saw a package of walnuts that said it had 3g of carbs (all of which were Dietary fiber), thus it had 0g of 'net carbs'. I was surprised to see this since it seems to be pretty common knowledge that nuts do have some net carbs in them, especially since the USDA foood database says that walnuts have a decent amount of carbs.

I'd really like to know if I can trust the label.

bradley
11-03-2003, 02:41 AM
I think the only thing you can do is take the nutrition label at face value and go with what is stated on the product. If you have doubts then either avoid the food, or compare it to similar products and see if the labels state close to the same thing.

bradley
11-03-2003, 02:44 AM
Originally posted by goobermor
It's a question I've been asking myself for a while. Are food products tested by a central authority that determines the nutritional facts on the back of a packaging?

There are companies that analyze the foods and prepare the information that is to be contained on the labels. These companies have to comply with guidelines set forth by the FDA.

defcon
11-03-2003, 05:01 AM
Yes its safe to trust them.. but watch for trans fats :) shouldnn't be eating anything with those in it anyway! so its no prob :)

Jasonl
11-03-2003, 08:09 AM
Yes its safe to trust them.. but watch for trans fats shouldnn't be eating anything with those in it anyway! so

i wish companys would list trans fats on the label, it would make life just that much easier.:)

donescobar2000
11-03-2003, 08:28 AM
They will be soon. All Food Companies have to list them by 2006.

Scott S
11-03-2003, 11:54 AM
I think labels are trustworthy, but you still have to use some common sense. All those products (such as cheese) that say <1g add up.

How much fat have you lost so far?

thetopdog
11-03-2003, 12:00 PM
Why exactly are trans fats so bad for you? Are they just unhealthy, or do they actually make you store more fat on your body than other forms of fat?

bradley
11-03-2003, 01:15 PM
Originally posted by thetopdog
Why exactly are trans fats so bad for you? Are they just unhealthy, or do they actually make you store more fat on your body than other forms of fat?

The main health concern would be the contributions that trans-fatty acids make to the increasing rate of heart disease, increases in LDL cholesterol being a major factor.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2374566&dopt=Abstract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10860195&dopt=Abstract

GonePostal
11-03-2003, 01:37 PM
To my knowledge (and I am not an expert in this field) the labels that are put on food stuffs are "regulated" by the FDA. This only means that there are guidelines that the FDA has set out. If a company follows those guidelines are up to that specific company since they are the ones that "test" their food stuffs to come up with the nutritional information. The FDA does do random testing to try to enforce their guidelines but there are too many foodstuffs for them to test (limited $$$). It would be a fairly good assumption that they do test large consumer products (cereal, fast food and what not) but for them to verify if every products is telling the truth is not possible. So just use common sense when buying things.

goobermor
11-03-2003, 05:07 PM
I've never looked to loose a lot of weight, but so far I lost around 3 lbs in the right area. Since I haven't been able to workout in a while, I have been relying on diet to keep my bodyfat down. I've always been pretty lean....sirations in the legs, good vacularity, etc., but I could never get this last little bit of fat off the bottom part of my stomach. Since I started the diet a couple weeks ago, I've noticed that this fat is almost gone.

Most likely I will go off the diet when this fat is gone. It's been a good way for me to burn that stubborn fat off, but I do like eaing a variey of foods in my daily intake.

Thanks for the info on the topic though....I think I'm still a bit skeptical about the packages claims (its Kirkland brand Walnut 20% Halfes from Costco). Seems like most other packaged walnuts have at least SOME 'net carbs', so I'll go with common sense on this one.