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View Full Version : Dont Drink Water While Eating?



dubliner
11-14-2003, 03:10 AM
I heard that when your eating a meal you should not drink lots of water because it will wash down some of the nutrients.I was just wondering if this is true.:confused:

defcon
11-14-2003, 05:09 AM
i remember hearing this sumwhere before also, i don't know the validity of it.. i drink anyway.. hard to eat rolled oats dry without finishing it off with a bit of water :P

Ironman8
11-14-2003, 08:02 AM
I don't think nutrients will wash away if you drink water. Unless you throw up your meal after :D

IceRgrrl
11-14-2003, 08:41 AM
No, it's just a silly myth. Water, food...it's all going down into your digestive system where nutrients will be extracted and processed. Drink while you eat...hydration is good for you. :p

geoffgarcia
11-14-2003, 08:58 AM
I would imagine that water would actually help in the digestive process...(key word being imagine)

Downunder
11-14-2003, 05:13 PM
To much will dilute the enzymes and the substrate, thereby decreasing the maximum velocity of the emzyme.

Spartacus
11-14-2003, 07:15 PM
i thought it was just so you didn't fill up on water and not get enough calories

AJ_11
11-15-2003, 02:42 AM
what about soup!

Downunder
11-15-2003, 03:08 AM
Soup is for peasants.

bradley
11-15-2003, 07:50 AM
Originally posted by Downunder
To much will dilute the enzymes and the substrate, thereby decreasing the maximum velocity of the emzyme.

Can you please provide some sort of reference that would indicate water with a meal will hinder digestion?

Saint Patrick
11-17-2003, 10:36 PM
The only reason I don't drink water while eating is so I can get more food in my belly before I feel full (when bulking).

Crystallio
11-18-2003, 12:14 AM
I imagine that if the nutrients can handle the hydrochloric acid in your stomach, they should be fine with water.

ChrisH
11-18-2003, 09:10 AM
Originally posted by Downunder
To much will dilute the enzymes and the substrate, thereby decreasing the maximum velocity of the emzyme.
Ok this has to be bull**** because you wouldn't say velocity or spell enzyme wrong if you were educated in nutrition or biology... I'm not by the way but im pretty sure that biologists dont refer to how quickly an enzyme is working by the word 'velocity'.

Who cares really though. Water is good, it hydrates you, and helps flush out bad stuff. Food is good because it gives you 'fuel'. I don't think it matters.

Alex.V
11-18-2003, 09:15 AM
Stomach enzyme activity is very, very rarely the rate limiting step in the digestive process. Lack of sufficient fiber and/or lack of water are far more detrimental to the process. Yes, theoretically if you diluted your stomach juices to, say, 1% of their regular concentration, you could hinder enzyme activity for a short period of time until your body noticed the lack of enzyme concentration and compensated.

Relentless
11-18-2003, 09:38 AM
Looks like someone paid attention in their orgchem class. ;)

ChrisH
11-18-2003, 09:39 AM
Hmm maybe I should start eating more fiber. Does fiber stay in your system or is it best to eat it with most meals? So could I just have my weetabix in the morning and some veg (fibrous carbs isnt it?) in the evening?

Minotaur
11-18-2003, 10:55 AM
Originally posted by Downunder
To much will dilute the enzymes and the substrate, thereby decreasing the maximum velocity of the emzyme.

Enzymes are protein based, not water soluble. It's a myth.

linuxchix
11-18-2003, 01:59 PM
How about wine instead of water? ;-)

mechanic2003
11-18-2003, 02:21 PM
A friend that's a nutritionalist said water helps with the digestion process

Maxgain
11-20-2003, 06:23 AM
Originally posted by ChrisH

Ok this has to be bull**** because you wouldn't say velocity or spell enzyme wrong if you were educated in nutrition or biology... I'm not by the way but im pretty sure that biologists dont refer to how quickly an enzyme is working by the word 'velocity'.

Who cares really though. Water is good, it hydrates you, and helps flush out bad stuff. Food is good because it gives you 'fuel'. I don't think it matters.

Anyone can make a typo error as he spelt enzyme right first and it is very common for biochemists etc to use 'velocity' as a measure of the rate of action of an enzyme on the substrate to form products. Just check any standard biochemistry book

SquareHead
11-20-2003, 06:35 AM
Originally posted by owensy
The operation of enzymes depends on the fit between the enzyme and the starting molecule or molecules in the reaction that the enzyme catalyses. The starting molecules for a chemical reaction are called the substrates. I'll show this simply:

substrate + enzyme --> enzyme substrate complex --> enzyme + products.

The enzyme takes part in a reaction, but doesn't change itself.(Think of this as a naturally-occurring catalyst, usually a protein, which is insoluble.)

Therefore, water, at the temp we end up with (which is why I imagine people, its better to drink water at a tepid temp, compared to boiling or freezing, which can affect the active site - ie, a chicken leg completely burnt isn't going to do much good) will do very little - if nothing - to affect an enzyme.

If we - as humans - are on average 60% water, then we'd be pretty stuffed if our water content were going to affect the way we function. Chemical reactions require a number of things, including water, to take place.

It's only when we are abusing our body with things that aren't good for it, such as alcohol (sorry people, I just think anything that is a depressant can't be good as a recreational drink!) that we compromise the good our body tries to do.

Water isn't going to make us look great. Most diet pills are diuretics, but we need water to function. We need it to flush our system of toxins, and to hydrate our muscles - this being a few of a lot of things we need it for.

I'd write more about this, which is a subject I feel strong about, but I have to go to bed right now. I hope the information I have supplied helps you all. I have the web addresses of several biology websites that I used to gain this conclusion. I've also had some training in biology, so I know a little about enzymes,etc.

Hydration is important, but like anything, it can be overdone. I try to drink at least 1.5 litres a day while I'm at work. More if I can manage it.

LOL!! Ok wow great!!