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Panacea
11-16-2003, 05:29 AM
I drink about 6-7 liters of water a day on days that I work (3-4 days a week). I recently read in a fitness mag that one of the top bodybuilders drinks at least 2 liters of water a day. Can you drink too much water????

defcon
11-16-2003, 08:04 AM
Yup :)

*SNIP* What happens is that as the athlete consumes large amounts of water over the course of the event, blood plasma (the liquid part of blood) increases. As this takes place, the salt content of the blood is diluted. At the same time, the athlete is losing salt by sweating. Consequently, the amount of salt available to the body tissues decreases over time to a point where the loss interferes with brain, heart, and muscle function.

The official name for this condition is hyponatremia. The symptoms generally mirror those of dehydration (apathy, confusion, nausea, and fatigue), although some individuals show no symptoms at all. If untreated, hyponatremia can lead to coma and even death.
* /SNIP *
Taken from http://www.hhp.ufl.edu/keepingfit/ARTICLE/toomuchwater.htm


3-4 liters should be enough.

bradley
11-16-2003, 08:12 AM
When quoting an article, study, post, etc. you should acknowledge the source of your information.

defcon
11-16-2003, 08:22 AM
Editited :) But im not sure how to "properly" qoute things from a website :P

MixmasterNash
11-16-2003, 08:51 AM
It's only really a danger in extreme cases, where you are not eating much food but are drinking a ton of water and sweating a lot. Hyponatremia has occured mostly in endurance athletes like marathoners, and a few people have died in the past few years.

It can be easily prevented by drinking Gatorade or a water/sugar/salt solution and eating right.

micko
11-16-2003, 09:48 AM
i drink bout 2-3 litres of water a day.
as long as i pissing clear n not yellow i think it is ok :cool:

6-7 liters!! id be going every 5 minutes! :hump:

Budiak
11-16-2003, 12:22 PM
Apparently thats where most X-related deaths come from. Ecstacy makes you extremely thirsty, and if you're in a club, you're dancing, sweating, constantly drinking water because you're thirsty but you're not eating anything, and all of a sudden your heap of a corpse is dragged out the back door because you're 'bringing everyone down.'

Panacea
11-16-2003, 01:13 PM
Thanks for the responses guys. I dont do a lot of sweating outside of the gym and I am lifting and dieting more for general health than anything else. I am mostly worried about flushing nutrients out of my system that would benefit me if they stuck around for a bit.

JuniorMint6669
11-16-2003, 01:36 PM
Originally posted by Panacea
Can you drink too much water????

Yup, its called drowning :D

ChampionLifter8
11-16-2003, 05:03 PM
i drink a gallon of water a day usually 3 times a week and im fine. Just make sure your eating food and drinking dont just drink like a weirdo. This is in my ipinion i dunno if im right. DRINK ALL U CAN

defcon
11-16-2003, 06:02 PM
Originally posted by JuniorMint6669


Yup, its called drowning :D

rofl. Nice one :P

revx2k1
05-25-2004, 02:25 PM
ok i know that this is not related to body building BUT i have a specific need that requires me to drink lots of water to "clean" my system out. yesterday i drank 7 liters of water and today i have consumed approx. 5 liters... how many liters is too much?

SquareHead
05-25-2004, 02:28 PM
REVX go to GNC and get the tea follow the directions on the box. You should be fine.

gopher
05-26-2004, 02:24 AM
7 liters is no where near dangerous. If you were drinking 7 gallons I might be worried about you, but 7 liters is pretty normal for an athlete IMO.

Augury
05-26-2004, 05:41 AM
I have a friend who was recently in hospital becasue she flushed the salts out of her body by over drinking. Amongst other symptoms she got a lot of "muscle twitches and spasms". The nerves that supply all out muscles use sodium and potassium to fire. If those salts are in an inbalance then they could either fire without control (twitching - cramping - tetanus) or not fire properly...or not at all (i think you can imagine what would happen if your diaphragm stopped working).

The doctors told her that her 4 liters was too much becasue she needed to remeber 50% of the water in her body comes from the solid food she eats. Veg are 90% water, meat is full of water...etc etc. So when the food she ate was taken into account she was around 6 liters a day apparently. She dosnt train however and is a small person.

All this said...ive never heard of anyone with problems caused by drinking 3-4-5 liters a day, especially if they are training. People in training tend to be drinking a lot, yes, but they are also eating a lot and there is PLENTY of salt in the food we eat even if we dont salt it.

7 liters does seem a lot (but thats only compared to me and a few folks i know who train hard - i do about 3-4 liters a day). 7 might be just fine for you if you are a big guy. If you feel thirsty then you should be drinking. If you start getting muscle cramps and twitches even when you arent training and especially at night then perhaps you are flushing too much salt out.

Augs

geoffgarcia
05-26-2004, 08:45 AM
How much water


water intoxication.
What happens is the sodium level in the blood reaches very low levels (because of dilution by excess water which can only be excreted in the urine, sweat or breath). This disturbs water balance in the brain, which can cause epileptic seizures and even death.

Research has shown that a person can safely drink up to 10 liters of water a day. An exception would be persons with kidney disease who are limited in the amount of water they can drink per day. Persons with bladder infections benefit from increasing their water intake.
http://www.dietitian.com/fluids.html



A large volume of water thins the blood and can actually make you "drunk." It washes water soluble nutrients (such as B vitamins) from the body. For a few persons with congestive heart disease or other conditions, serious edema or other conditions might occur. The kidneys have to work harder to remove the excess water from the body and that too must be taken into account. Someone drinking a lot of water would have to take vitamins and minerals to replace those purged from the body and would have to carefully avoid salt.
http://www.prisoners.com/cwaterd.html



"water intoxication." Is usually associated with long distance events like running and cycling, itís not an unusual problem.
For example, water intoxication was reported in 18% of marathon runners and in 29% of the finishers in a Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon in studies published recently in the Annals of Internal Medicine and in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise respectively.

What happens is that as the athlete consumes large amounts of water over the course of the event, blood plasma (the liquid part of blood) increases. As this takes place, the salt content of the blood is diluted. At the same time, the athlete is losing salt by sweating. Consequently, the amount of salt available to the body tissues decreases over time to a point where the loss interferes with brain, heart, and muscle function.

The official name for this condition is hyponatremia. The symptoms generally mirror those of dehydration (apathy, confusion, nausea, and fatigue), although some individuals show no symptoms at all. If untreated, hyponatremia can lead to coma and even death.

Enough, but not too much. The fluid requirement for the majority of endurance athletes, under most conditions, is about 8 to 16 ounces per hour. There is considerable variation here, of course, due to individual sweating rates, body size and weight, heat and humidity, and running speed, and other factors. Still, much more than this amount of fluid is, in most instances, probably physiologically excessive as well as uncomfortable, as liquid sloshes around in the gut during the activity.


It is now thought people should follow the dictates of thirst and not to exceed 1-1.5 quarts per hour
http://healthfactsandfears.com/featured_articles/jul2003/water072403.html

1 liter = 4.22675282 US cups
1 US gallon = 3.7854118 liters
1 US cup = 8 US fluid ounces
1 US quart = 4 US cups
1 US gallon = 4 US quarts

SOO!!! it appears that
4-6 cups, or 32-48oz per hour is close to the limit

and 42 cups, 336oz, 2.65 gallons is around the safe daily intake limit, although its considered VERY high and beyond overkill

–ragons
05-26-2004, 11:13 AM
you can drown yourself iff u drink to much water, ofc this is going on a all day water session ;)
but....