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mstar
11-26-2003, 09:29 AM
why is that? in the world champs/olympic rankings most are hungarian/bulgarian/polish etc etc

:confused: :confused:

Paul Stagg
11-26-2003, 09:34 AM
Better training.

Paul Stagg
11-26-2003, 09:35 AM
Read this:

http://www.elitefts.com/documents/TomMyslinski.pdf

geoffgarcia
11-26-2003, 09:39 AM
Random thoughts:
in the 80's I think the majority of steroids were generated out there. They see what Arnold did and figure why can't I!

They rest a lot more over there than the typical american. I think Americans work more hours in a year than any other country in the world.

Of course this is probably western propaganda to pull the attention off of us.

phreak
11-26-2003, 10:09 AM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia
Of course this is probably western propaganda to pull the attention off of us. Yes. :)

Neil
11-26-2003, 10:28 AM
Originally posted by Paul Stagg
Read this:

http://www.elitefts.com/documents/TomMyslinski.pdf

Does anybody here train like that?

mstar
11-26-2003, 10:31 AM
Originally posted by Paul Stagg
Better training.


hmmm yes paul but what do they do thats so different? there is no secret in gaining strength there must be there diet or supplementation?

Paul Stagg
11-26-2003, 10:40 AM
Did you read the article?

Neil - Some probably try to.

chris mason
11-26-2003, 11:04 AM
Not better training in my opinion. It is popularity. Weightlifting is a much more popular sport in Europe. Strength sports in general are more popular in those countries.

Thus you have a larger pool of talent to draw from and better results. This has always been so.

Paul Stagg
11-26-2003, 11:10 AM
True, that. Same is true with, say, soccer players.

I do think the training difference matters, though. (as does the coaching of soccer players)

Kids in the soviet system are identified very young as good potential ATHLETES. They are trained to improve general physical traits for a long time before they get specific - Which does two things - they build on a stronger base, and they don't burn out or get injured at a young age.

chris mason
11-26-2003, 11:20 AM
Little Vladimiroff, you must traaaainnnnnn.....

But I want my mommy...:cry:

Soviet Union is your mommy now, she vill make you strong like Siberian mosquitoes....

geoffgarcia
11-26-2003, 11:23 AM
I hear what u guys r saying...but I don't think its a truth (something that is universal)

Following ur logic that popularity/talent pool explains strength in sports, I can't figure out why Kenyans are the shiznit in marathons

I think the US has more runners that can rub a sub 4 minute mile than most countries, yet we still get it handed to us in any of the longer events.

Max-Mex
11-26-2003, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia
Following ur logic that popularity/talent pool explains strength in sports, I can't figure out why Kenyans are the shiznit in marathons


Kenyans and Marathons (http://slate.msn.com/id/2090658/n.com/id/2090658/)

geoffgarcia
11-26-2003, 11:53 AM
Max-Mex that was fasinating! thanks!

Jane
11-26-2003, 11:55 AM
Originally posted by chris mason
Little Vladimiroff, you must traaaainnnnnn.....

But I want my mommy...:cry:

Soviet Union is your mommy now, she vill make you strong like Siberian mosquitoes....

LOL.

Chris, stop talking about my childhood. It brings back bad memories involving twins named Boris and Igor.


...Ah, the motherland. How I love it.

The answer you're all looking for and missing is, clearly, that Russia and the smaller wannabe Russias simply kick serious ass. Look at the last 100 years of our history. We're a hardcore and melancholy people.

Neil
11-26-2003, 11:59 AM
:rolleyes:

chris mason
11-26-2003, 12:47 PM
If you have ever seen anything about the Africans it makes perfect sense. Much like the inner city impoverished youth in our country who see professional football and basketball as their tickout out, the Africans see running as their ticket out. All of the big time Kenyan runners support their extended families back home. It is a great sport for them because you literally need nothing in order to participate.

In addition, they don't have cars (for the most part) and they have to cover huge distances on foot as part of their daily routines.

So, while absolute numbers are part of the game, the absolute cultural obsession of the Kenyans makes the biggest impact in their case.

chris mason
11-26-2003, 12:51 PM
Man am I good, I posted that before I saw the above link.

PowerManDL
11-26-2003, 12:52 PM
Bulgaria has 8 million people and they as a country have been consistently placing weightlifters in every international competition including the Olympics for quite awhile.

chris mason
11-26-2003, 01:12 PM
I am willing to bet a ****load more Bulgarians try to become weightlifters than Americans despite the population difference.

I am willing to bet a LOT.

body
11-26-2003, 02:14 PM
while norhtern europeans seem to be better at strong man comps.

BigCorey75
11-26-2003, 08:00 PM
bodybuiling.


bodybuilding in america has ruined the sport of weightlifting in america. let me explain...


the first weight lifting related magazine was a bodybuiling magazine, this leads lots of americans wanting huge biceps than a huge bench, better quad seperation than a high squat poundage.

over the years bodybuiling philosopies have poured over in to powerlifting and olympic lifting and has poisioned the base of weight lifting as a sport for americans.

i can appreciated both aspects of the iron game powerlifting and bodybuilding but powelifting has suffered more from bodybuilding and bodybuilding has gained alot from powerlifting.

while over in eastern europe the methods and love of lifting weight is still pure. they care more about how much weight they can lift other than how there abs look when their on the beach. its a totally different mind set eastern euopeans have. also like the kenyas weightlifting may be a way for them out of poverty.

its all a matter of whats popular and whats important as to what you are going to be good at.

phreak
11-27-2003, 02:06 AM
Absolutely right, BigCorey. In the former Eastern Bloc, being good at weightlifting basically guaranteed getting a government-appointed coaching job after your career, i.e., getting enough food on the table.

chris mason
11-27-2003, 07:41 AM
Well, I was pondering this a bit more this morning. To further my thoughts, one need only look at powerlifting. The very best powerlifters in the heaviest weight classes have traditionally been American. The English and some other countries have had their share, especially in the lighter classes, but the strongest of the strong have almost always been American.

The reason for this has nothing to do with training, it goes back to culture. Powerlifting is basically an American sport. Formal powerlifting as we know it today came from the USA.

So, why does the US have the record setting big boys and not Bulgaria and other European coutries where strength sports are so important? Well, amongst those who lift weights the biggest and strongest Americans tend to pick powerlifting as their sport of choice. Very few choose Olympic lifting due to the fact it has very little popularity in this country. Going back to our other examples, those young Russians etc. choose Olympic lifting because it is popular in their country, moreso than here.

In the end, it's all about culture, not training methods.

phreak
11-28-2003, 01:46 AM
Originally posted by chris mason
The very best powerlifters in the heaviest weight classes have traditionally been American. The English and some other countries have had their share, especially in the lighter classes, but the strongest of the strong have almost always been American. True, but now both americans and western-europeans are fvcked, because the eastern bloc is really getting into PLing now...

From the latest IPF world's results:

Nation (points)
1 Russia 69
2 Ukraine 63
3 Poland 49
4 U.S. America 44

So essentially the same as last year. And although an american won the supers this year, the -275 was dominated by the former eastern bloc (first 4 places).

chris mason
11-28-2003, 05:48 AM
Much like basketball etc. I agree that if those eastern Europeans really get into powerlifting we shall see a shift to them unless we can make powerlifting more popular (and lucrative---most importantly) here in the states.

Maccer101
11-28-2003, 06:08 AM
Eastern european countries have alot less money to invest in sports programmes and therefore equipment, olympic/powerlifting is therefore an ideal sports to promote as the equipment costs are:-

1 barbell plus some weights

They don't need to build a big track or swimming pool. This is the same reason that they dominate gymnastics, its just down to economics. These countries have made a concious decision to excel in a very specific field of sports instead of spreading the money thinly over a multitude of sports and therefore not be competitive in any.

phreak
12-01-2003, 01:47 AM
That's not completely accurate, as especially weightlifting can be very expensive -- simply due to the enormous cost of good coaches being around all the time. And as they often lift 5-6 days per week, 2-3 times per day...

Also, there is no state sponsoring of PLing and especially a few years ago, eastern bloc lifters had to buy second-hand suits and shirts or simply couldn't afford them at all.

Paul Stagg
12-01-2003, 09:37 AM
US PLers only really dominate in the higher weight classes. Why would that be?

Reinier
12-01-2003, 10:54 AM
BEcause they have more food in the USA. so more people can afford to compete in the heavyweights lol

benchmonster
12-03-2003, 10:20 AM
Originally posted by phreak
True, but now both americans and western-europeans are fvcked, because the eastern bloc is really getting into PLing now...

From the latest IPF world's results:

Nation (points)
1 Russia 69
2 Ukraine 63
3 Poland 49
4 U.S. America 44

So essentially the same as last year. And although an american won the supers this year, the -275 was dominated by the former eastern bloc (first 4 places).

Yes, but you are only looking at the IPF. IPF does not at all, not even come close to having the strongest american competitors. IPF is supposed to be drug free, and they probably do as good a job as they can to remain so. In the Eastern European countries, there are no other feds for competitors to choose, so, by default, the strongest people there, very often steroid users, end up lifting in the IPF.

Here in the good old USA, we have a tiny bit of freedom of choice. The strongest people in the US are competing in the IPA and the APF, which do not test for steroids and allow multiple layers of equipment.

Nobody ever in the history of the world has done a 700 bench in the IPF. And no person in the history of the world, other than an American has ever benched 700. But there have been approximately 30 to 35 Americans that have benched 700 or more in competition.

So if you are really looking at the strongest men from each country, instead of the strongest IPF competitors from each country, you would find Americans dominating in almost every single weight class in men's powerlifting. Look at the all time world records in Squat, Bench and Deadlift, almost without exception, they were all set in the WPO (professional arm of APF), the APF, or the IPA, and the vast, vast majority of those all time records were set by Americans, mostly from the midwest and the northeast. Blue Collar lifters from blue collar areas of the country.

And the reason we suck in olympic lifting is 3fold, IMHO. First, and foremost, is that bodybuilding has ruined strength training in this country. Someone already pointed this out, and I will not spend any more time on that subject, as he did a great job with it.

Second, as Chris Mason so aptly pointed out, is cultural. It simply is not "cool" to be an Olympic lifter in the US. When is the last time someone asked you how much you could snatch, or clean and jerk? And how many of you would know the answer if they did ask it? I would not be able to answer that question either.

And third is the training. The training system used in america is simply not up to the standards used in bulgaria, russia, etc. . .

But it is innacurate to say that those same countries dominate powerlifting, because they do not. They might dominate the IPF, but that is not the same as dominating powerlifting.

Nobody from Europe is squatting anywhere near what Mikesell and Goggins is doing, nobody is benching what Halbert, Mendelson, Crawford and Rychlik are doing, and nobody except Andy Bolton is deadlifting like Ed Coan, Garry Frank or Lamar Gant. Nor is anyone across the pond threatening Frank or Coan's totals.

B.

phreak
12-03-2003, 11:10 AM
Originally posted by benchmonster
Yes, but you are only looking at the IPF. IPF does not at all, not even come close to having the strongest american competitors.Mike Bridges, Walt Thomas, Fred Hatfield, Ed Coan, Kirk Karwoski, Shane Hamman, c.s. are nobodies in the US?


IPF is supposed to be drug free, and they probably do as good a job as they can to remain so. In the Eastern European countries, there are no other feds for competitors to choose, so, by default, the strongest people there, very often steroid users, end up lifting in the IPF.This implies that the americans lifting in the IPF are NOT using. Which (let's be honest here) is patently untrue.


Here in the good old USA, we have a tiny bit of freedom of choice.Yay. When I last checked a PL USA mag (probably 1996) there were 27. One for every combination of tested/non-tested, raw/equiped, laxer rules/stricter rules, ... :rolleyes:


The strongest people in the US are competing in the IPA and the APF, which do not test for steroids and allow multiple layers of equipment. So seeing as they are never drug-tested, can wear multi-ply gear (and briefs) and use a monolift, how can this be a valid comparison?


Nobody ever in the history of the world has done a 700 bench in the IPF.James Henderson, 320,0 kg (705) shirtless; 07.12.1997.


And no person in the history of the world, other than an American has ever benched 700. But there have been approximately 30 to 35 Americans that have benched 700 or more in competition. Other than Henderson not one in the IPF, by far the world's largest and most respected organisation. Odd, isn't it?


So if you are really looking at the strongest men from each country, instead of the strongest IPF competitors from each country, you would find Americans dominating in almost every single weight class in men's powerlifting.So in your opinion the rest of the world, even when given the same drugs and equipment, wouldn't be able to compete? Are americans somehow genetically superior?



On a side note: I do agree that on average more americans would be represented in the heavier classes. That is mainly due to society (americans being heaviest because of bad diet) and the influence of american football, which necessitates large physiques.

benchmonster
12-04-2003, 08:21 AM
Phreak, thanks for pointing out Henderson, forgot that one. And I never said Hammon, Captain Kirk, Coan etc. . . are nobodies, but, besides Coan, who has not competed in over a year due to injury, who else on that list still competes?

There was a time when the strongest in the US, like those you mentioned competed there, but those days have passed us by.

I don't think americans are genetically superior, necessarily, but with better access to proper food and training facilities, americans dominate in many sports and powerlifting is one of those sports. I was refuting the notion that the eastern europeans were somehow superior and dominant.

And re: drug use in the IPF/USAPL I have no doubt many there are using. And they are pieces of **** for doing so. I say this as an admitted steroid user. They are a piece of ****, not for using gear, but for breaking the rules of their organization to do so. In America, there are places you can go, APF, APF, IPA, where they do not test, and if you are on the sauce, you should compete in those kind of places so the playing field is level. It is not fair to the truly clean competitors out there for a person who is jacked to enter a "drug free" event. And if I hinted that all the IPF lifters from the US were clean, then I did not intend to do so.

And re: the US only being dominant in the heavier classes, Coan set records from the 148's all the way to the 242's. Bridges was a monster at 148 and 165, and Lamar Gant was a record holder in the 132's and possibly (tho I'm not sure) in the 123's. Among those currently competing, I don't think there are any people across the pond lifting better at 165 than Ron Palmer. I frankly don't pay that much attention to the guys any smaller than 165, so I cannot comment on any of the lightest classes.

B.

phreak
12-04-2003, 01:05 PM
I have to agree with you (although it pains me... ;) ) on the IPF steroid issue. Everyone knows steroid use is rampant there as well (I know several intl competitors personally, and I know exactly what they used), but nobody wants to be the one to come out and say it. It is a hypocrisy that I'm glad to hear you despise as well. In fact I would argue that, although drug choices are more limited there, they are actually more dangerous, as lifters will predominantly use short-ester orals instead of safer injectables -- with all known side-effects.

As for the lighter classes: I don't have a lot of info on the records for IPA, APF, etc. (any help is appreciated! :D) But I still posit that those will not be dominated by americans. Like I said earlier: there is the typical US culture of bigger=better, which I surmise would favour heavier weight classes.

And yes, the US was the world's guiding light in PLing for decades. I grew up reading about the Bridges bros, Anello, Pacifico and the like. But the world is catching up! ;)

noraa
12-06-2003, 02:06 AM
Bench, you have also forgotten the long lost fins, some of who are actually lifting in the WPC with some big assed weights

THe world champion in the 275+ class (brent siders) also just benched 699.96 at the world 3 lift championships. The world bench champs are on this weekend, and hendersons record should be history (Henderson could have upped the record, but he stopped lifting competitively for some reason. He is one of the worlds greatest benchers)

I also have absolutely nothing against people using steroids, but those who do so in a drug tested federation are pieces of ****, it would be as bad as getting a single phenom checked in, then lifting in a double.

chris mason
12-06-2003, 06:05 PM
Henderson's RAW bench? Mendelson beat that some months ago. Are you saying that Henderson's bench has been the record in that particular federation all of this time?

phreak
12-07-2003, 01:26 AM
yep. Remember the IPF has far stricter rules though, for lift performance, equipment (which is irrelevant in this case as neither used any) and drug testing.

noraa
12-08-2003, 10:08 PM
I have never seen footage of Mendys 713lb, but I have seen his 701lb lift. and it would not have passed under IPF rules. 1) he sinks the bar into his chest and the major one 2) Hes benching on the very ball of his foot, under IPF you have to have a flat foot.
It would be truely impressive to see what Henderson was capable of with full denim. I have footage of him doing 700, easily, raw, no arch.

benchmonster
12-09-2003, 08:24 AM
I did not forget the Fins. Finland is in WESTERN EUROPE tho. And the Fins, as a people are probably the best pullers in the world. Ano Turtainen is amazing, and had he not torn both triceps in the last couple of years, severely hampering his bench, I think he could be competitive even with the great Garry Frank for the total record.

Very interesting thread, great topic to discuss.

B.

ElPietro
12-18-2003, 02:32 PM
I'm not sure you can say strongest aren't competing in the IPF. The IPF simply has different standards. If they have strict form and equipment rules, that doesn't mean that they are weaker lifters, just their totals are lower as they are required to conform to more stringent rules. I'm sure if you took a top level IPF person, and allowed them to train and compete with the looser federations form and equipment rules, they would total higher, just as in reverse, someone from APF would total lower with less allowances for equipment and form. Does that make one person stronger? I don't think it does.

I will at least use the IPF as a benchmark as it's the only federation that is wide spread, from country to country, with pretty strict rules and regs, and rather tight controls on setting records. Not to say you can't use the APF or whatever, especially if you compete within that fed. But I don't think you can simply state stronger guys lift here because their totals are higher. That's like me starting a federation that allows quarter squats and saying we have the strongest guys in the world since they are hitting 1200 lbs. Not to disrespect any federations, it's just not apples to apples is what I'm saying.

I've never competed, but have trained with some old time plifters, and helped out with one event, which was under the CPU, a branch of the IPF. I know that any member that was attempting a record lift, required internationally licensed referees to judge the lift, and then afterwards, I was the Marshall in charge of the record setters. They weren't allowed out of my sight for a single second, and couldn't accept any food or beverages other than the water bottles I gave them until they pissed in a cup, again under supervision.

Bronek
02-16-2004, 03:20 AM
Why Easteuropeans are better?!
because now we (easteuropeans) CAPITALISE on all the KNOWLADGE, research and work that was put into sport in the past!!!
All the scientific basies of periodisation, whole sport theory/science, research based on HUNDREDS of lifters started in this part of Europe.
Some-one above mentioned "juice" as the reason - My friend, in the past (talking about Poland for example), in 80's one jab of Vinstrol cost ONE week wages!!! You could buy it for a few $$. At present this is NOT an issue, however, chances/opportunities are absolutely the same everywhere. This is simply the matter of GUTS (!!!) and hard work! Nothing else!
Look why L. Simmons and these guys are so good at present?? They spent hundreds, maybe thousands hours over estern papers, studing and learning the stuff. Now they rule! Why Dr. Squat is a "dr Squat"?? what is he talking about in his papers related to training?

Do not despair however, you also have some GOOD guys.

Regards,
:hump:

prof
02-16-2004, 05:29 AM
Like a few of you mentioned above I think motivation is one of the major factors,

few americans will make a hugely better life for themselves through weightlifting, and the genetically gifted might tend to go into pro football for example due to the amount of money available. In the old eastern block countries the national teams were a big chance of improving your lifestyle.

And Arnolds example just shows what that motivation can do

WannabeSmalljjk
02-16-2004, 03:42 PM
My friend has 4 world records in drug free power lifting I think its the APF. He is in a lower weight class too, 123's at comp, 17 years old at the time.Everyone at my gym has a world record but me =( .

Saint Patrick
02-16-2004, 08:53 PM
Everyone at my gym has a world record but me =( .

What gym is that?

ElPietro
02-17-2004, 08:09 AM
Lol, maybe he works out at home with a bunch of posters of elite powerlifters on the wall. :D

gino
02-22-2004, 01:52 PM
I think genetics plays some role as well. Eastern Europeans *in general* have a larger bone structure, allowing for more muscle mass and slightly advantageous muscle/tendon insertion points.

twcolabear
03-14-2004, 10:24 AM
who ever said that kids are picked out early in life is right. Teachers are taught to pick out students that excell at certain things, and there is a lot more pressure on becoming the best than in the States. But if you are doing something that the teachers dont' think you'll be good at, they tellyou to leave. This is not exactly the same but, when i was growing up in Russia, my parents sent me to music school. The choire teacher made 10 kids leave her class, because she didn't think they could sing good enough. But teachers could also be wrong, they told my parents i have no ability towards language and will never be able to speak anything but Russian. I proved them wrong, i speak 4 :) (sorry a bit of resentment there)

Also being big is cool in russia, so if you can also make a living and *dream* move to US then you are set for life.

kensterz
03-14-2004, 03:13 PM
What I know of is, Europeans go for size. For massive size, you need to move big weight. Americans tend to go for that more "cut" look, which is how Arnold first lost in the Mr. Olympia challenge in America. He got that tone and definition from his size, and that's how he won the rest of his competitions. So I guess Europeans can move bigger weight, but we look better :)

phreak
03-15-2004, 01:49 AM
... I guess Europeans can move bigger weight, but we look better :)
With me being the exception, obviously. I do both. :D

Tallwithbrneyez
03-15-2004, 02:33 AM
Its not just eastern europeans. Scandinavians mostly. I think they get it from their nordic viking genes

Exnor
03-15-2004, 03:27 AM
BEcause they have more food in the USA. so more people can afford to compete in the heavyweights lol

That would be my first assumption too. :)

bIgHwN86
03-16-2004, 12:44 AM
"Second, as Chris Mason so aptly pointed out, is cultural. It simply is not "cool" to be an Olympic lifter in the US. When is the last time someone asked you how much you could snatch, or clean and jerk? And how many of you would know the answer if they did ask it? I would not be able to answer that question either. "


---i agree to the statement above by an earlier poster...but at the weight room at my school olympic lifting is coming back w/avrengance...though some guys believe that cleaning and jerking is a new way to shoulder press :confused:

AlTep55
12-05-2010, 07:08 PM
Hi to all. I am from a former Soviet Union. I came to US in 1990, at the age of 37. I was Olympic style weight lifter and then power weight lifter. When I start my workout in America (in Dayton, OH at Larry Pacifico's gym) I was surprised how philosophy of body building adversely influenced on designing of weightlifters' training program. I was continue to apply a knowledge I acquired in USSR, and soon I was benching at the world record level. I am still following the same principals and using results of scientists and laboratories who do research for elite sportsmen and Olympic teams. This past August, at the age 57 and body weight 160 lbs, my bench 390 lbs (I am benching raw). Check an official world record for raw bench in my age and weight category.

I was trying to promote what I am doing but had a very few followers. Oh, and btw, there are a lot of differences between these systems.

AlTep55
12-05-2010, 07:16 PM
"Second, as Chris Mason so aptly pointed out, is cultural. It simply is not "cool" to be an Olympic lifter in the US. When is the last time someone asked you how much you could snatch, or clean and jerk? And how many of you would know the answer if they did ask it? I would not be able to answer that question either. "


---i agree to the statement above by an earlier poster...but at the weight room at my school olympic lifting is coming back w/avrengance...though some guys believe that cleaning and jerking is a new way to shoulder press :confused:

America used to be a great Olympic style weight lifting country, but how many of you remember names of Paul Andersen, Harry Shemansky and other great American lifters?

Ramo
12-08-2010, 07:41 PM
On my view, there are a couple reasons the IPF, (which draws from the broadest pool of lifters around the world, and therefore offers the highest level of competition,) is dominated by former eastern-bloc lifters.

1. There is more to be gained from success in powerlifting on the other side of the pond. No one stateside can afford to be a full-time powerlifter. Even guys who go to IPF worlds are back at their day jobs a week later.

2. If Barry Sanders was born in Latvia, he might have been a 100kg IPF world champ. If Konstantin Konstantinovs had been born in the US he would have been Dwight Freeney. If Tony Cardella or Mike Mastrean or any of our best lifters could be playing in the NFL, they probably would be.

3. They train ****ing hard and they train a lot, and the capacity to do that is ingrained in the culture and has been developed from childhood. We don't do that here.

NickAus
12-08-2010, 09:45 PM
Hi to all. I am from a former Soviet Union. I came to US in 1990, at the age of 37. I was Olympic style weight lifter and then power weight lifter. When I start my workout in America (in Dayton, OH at Larry Pacifico's gym) I was surprised how philosophy of body building adversely influenced on designing of weightlifters' training program. I was continue to apply a knowledge I acquired in USSR, and soon I was benching at the world record level. I am still following the same principals and using results of scientists and laboratories who do research for elite sportsmen and Olympic teams. This past August, at the age 57 and body weight 160 lbs, my bench 390 lbs (I am benching raw). Check an official world record for raw bench in my age and weight category.

I was trying to promote what I am doing but had a very few followers. Oh, and btw, there are a lot of differences between these systems.

The point you make about "I was surprised how philosophy of body building adversely influenced on designing of weightlifters' training program." interests me.

I also believe people seem to focus too much on bodybuilding and not enough on getting stronger on the big 3.

Please go into detail of the differences you have noticed.

Thanks.

NickAus
12-08-2010, 09:48 PM
Just read though this, this is a great thread!

Keep it coming!

K-R-M
12-09-2010, 07:01 AM
Hi to all. I am from a former Soviet Union. I came to US in 1990, at the age of 37. I was Olympic style weight lifter and then power weight lifter. When I start my workout in America (in Dayton, OH at Larry Pacifico's gym) I was surprised how philosophy of body building adversely influenced on designing of weightlifters' training program. I was continue to apply a knowledge I acquired in USSR, and soon I was benching at the world record level. I am still following the same principals and using results of scientists and laboratories who do research for elite sportsmen and Olympic teams. This past August, at the age 57 and body weight 160 lbs, my bench 390 lbs (I am benching raw). Check an official world record for raw bench in my age and weight category.

I was trying to promote what I am doing but had a very few followers. Oh, and btw, there are a lot of differences between these systems.


I'd be interested in hearing more on the systems to be honest.

I currently live in a slavic country in (central) Europe and I found some powerlifting/weightlifting gyms. I haven't trained with them because I haven't had time, but what I saw impressed me. If I get a job here, I'll definitely join up.

A few things though:

Genes: People are taller and are thicker in general.
Culture: People love strength and fighting here. Sports in general actually.
Food: A very protein heavy diet accross the board.
Mentality: No bull****, people just do what works and throw out what doesn't. They don't give a **** what you think either.