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View Full Version : too expensive to compete!!



synthetic
11-26-2003, 02:40 PM
people talk about why many peopel dont compete, esp in the dead comp.

well in the apa bench and dead meet coming up here, for a first timer
its 25$ to get a membershiop which is required
45$ to enter the competition and compete in one class
20$ for eacha dditinal class.

...i love pwoer lifting, but im not gonna pay at "least" 70$ to compete in "1" of the events

Adam
11-26-2003, 02:52 PM
What do you mean by each additional class? Like Open and Junior or bench only and 3 lift?

synthetic
11-26-2003, 03:28 PM
open and junior

Saint Patrick
11-27-2003, 01:05 AM
Dude if $70 is the only thing keeping you from competing, then you were never that serious about it to begin with.

If I was a PL'er, I'd gladly pay the entry fee to compete.

phreak
11-27-2003, 02:10 AM
Well, it is a complete rip-off. Maybe it's because I see meets being divided up in about a bazillion categories with one or two lifters per category, just to be able to give everyone a ridiculously large trophy.

synthetic
11-27-2003, 08:01 AM
it should be less for amatures, arent there a couple of organizations. not gonna pay 70$ for 1 pull
can better spend it on products to enhance strength even more :D

Paul Stagg
12-01-2003, 09:32 AM
So do a 3 lift meet.

Same cost.

It's expensive to run a meet, you know... people aren't getting rich off this.

synthetic
12-01-2003, 12:22 PM
dont care much for stupid trophies or what ever, would like to be eligible for my name to be written in a record book

benchmonster
12-03-2003, 09:57 AM
If you compete in anything it is expensive. I used to compete in golf (please don't laugh) and I have over 1500 invested in equipment, and was spending over 200 per month to practice and play. Then to enter a tournament was going to run at least 50 bucks. Over the course of a year that "sport" costs several thousands of dollars, even if you play on public courses.

I also have competed, and will again, in action pistol. The stock class guns will run 1200 to 1500 or more for a competitive pistol, and the unlimited class will often have a price tag of $4,000 or even more. And that is before you buy a speed holster, another 200 bucks, a timer to practice, another 150 there, and lest we forget, every time you pull the trigger, it costs about 20 cents, so a typical competitor practicing with 200 rounds per week is going through $160/month in bullets, assuming he loads his own, so put another 400 to 700 for a loader and supplies in there, oh, and of course the range fees, which are typically $5 or more each time you shoot, and before you know it, we have another very expensive hobby.

Now to powerlifting. Well, we need some equipment if we are going to be competitive, and the best shirt made is going to run us about 150 bucks, and another 150 for the best squat suit made, then about 75 for a belt, another 30 for knee and wrist wraps, and now we are equipped as well as the best in the world for under $500 bucks. Then, we have to buy a card, typically 25 bucks a year, and go to 3 or 4 competitions per year, which range from 25 to 50 dollars each to enter. So our powerlifter is out maybe, maybe at the high end, assuming 4 comps a year and the best equipment money can buy, he is out $750 per year.

Try and compare that kind of money outlay with other hobbies, such as golf, shooting (both listed above), hunting, fishing (priced a boat lately?), racing, sailing, etc. . . and you will discover, that powerlifting is a very cheap hobby when compared with many others.

But it is all a matter of priorities, when I was in college, I did not have much money. I went 4 years without cable, or even a television, because the cable company and the local gym were both charging about 25 a month for their services. I chose to put my meager funds toward a gym membership, and I purposefully located a job as a waiter, so I could get the extra food I needed without spending a bunch of money I did not have.

It is all a matter of priorities, if it is important to you, you will do it. If it is not important to you, then you will not. Simple as that.

B.

Chris Rodgers
12-03-2003, 01:17 PM
Very well put BM!

Saint Patrick
12-05-2003, 10:20 PM
Originally posted by benchmonster
If you compete in anything it is expensive. I used to compete in golf (please don't laugh) and I have over 1500 invested in equipment, and was spending over 200 per month to practice and play. Then to enter a tournament was going to run at least 50 bucks. Over the course of a year that "sport" costs several thousands of dollars, even if you play on public courses.

I also have competed, and will again, in action pistol. The stock class guns will run 1200 to 1500 or more for a competitive pistol, and the unlimited class will often have a price tag of $4,000 or even more. And that is before you buy a speed holster, another 200 bucks, a timer to practice, another 150 there, and lest we forget, every time you pull the trigger, it costs about 20 cents, so a typical competitor practicing with 200 rounds per week is going through $160/month in bullets, assuming he loads his own, so put another 400 to 700 for a loader and supplies in there, oh, and of course the range fees, which are typically $5 or more each time you shoot, and before you know it, we have another very expensive hobby.

Now to powerlifting. Well, we need some equipment if we are going to be competitive, and the best shirt made is going to run us about 150 bucks, and another 150 for the best squat suit made, then about 75 for a belt, another 30 for knee and wrist wraps, and now we are equipped as well as the best in the world for under $500 bucks. Then, we have to buy a card, typically 25 bucks a year, and go to 3 or 4 competitions per year, which range from 25 to 50 dollars each to enter. So our powerlifter is out maybe, maybe at the high end, assuming 4 comps a year and the best equipment money can buy, he is out $750 per year.

Try and compare that kind of money outlay with other hobbies, such as golf, shooting (both listed above), hunting, fishing (priced a boat lately?), racing, sailing, etc. . . and you will discover, that powerlifting is a very cheap hobby when compared with many others.

But it is all a matter of priorities, when I was in college, I did not have much money. I went 4 years without cable, or even a television, because the cable company and the local gym were both charging about 25 a month for their services. I chose to put my meager funds toward a gym membership, and I purposefully located a job as a waiter, so I could get the extra food I needed without spending a bunch of money I did not have.

It is all a matter of priorities, if it is important to you, you will do it. If it is not important to you, then you will not. Simple as that.

B.


Amen.

nejar462
01-01-2004, 05:38 PM
I dunno what your financial situation is like, but even if you worked at minimum wage you'd be able to compete once or twice a year.

LOL BM is right, if you like racing, you're going to buried in debt. PLifting is very easy financially.

ElPietro
01-02-2004, 06:17 AM
I don't even know if there is a single federation anywhere that makes money. There are so many feds that getting enough sponsorship is not that easy, and most of the guys running it are doing it for the love of the sport, not profit. I know up here they are always just praying to break even, but pretty much never do. And that's with volunteers unloading the thousands of kilos in weight plates and equipment. Usually only the judges get paid, but many of the judges are the ones that are helping finance the comp anyway, so still take a hit to the wallet in one way or another.

Considering you'd probably only train for and enter a handful of comps a year, I don't see how $70 is that much money. Considering the training motivation and enjoyment you get preparing over months of time for a single comp, I'd say the money is well spent.