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View Full Version : Bradley, this goes against what you say.



mr_hand
12-01-2003, 12:53 PM
Once again in the nutrition department, we have a nice contradiction.

Bradley I wanted you to check this out because you are one of the most knowledgeable people on nutrition that I know. How do you feel about what this guy is saying cuz I know you back the theory of a calorie is a calorie and cals in vs. cals out. Tell me what you think.

This guys post says "4 tips for fast fat loss"

By: Greg Gillies

"In addition, by adding more protein to each meal, you also increase your metabolism. Your body requires more energy (i.e. calories) to process protein than it does to digest carbohydrates. Do you understand what that means? Think about it. Think about all those people and so called experts that have continually said that a calorie is a calorie.

THIS SIMPLY IS NOT TRUE! Your body's metabolic rate is affected by the number of meals you eat, the frequency of those meals (how much time passes between each meal consumed) and the macro nutrient composition of those meals.

A calorie is not simply a calorie and they are not equal.

Depending on the number of meals, frequency of meals, and macro nutrient composition of meals, the same person's metabolism will be different on two very different meals plans, EVEN IF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF CALORIES ARE THE SAME! "

galileo
12-01-2003, 01:10 PM
The author is close as far as fat loss/gain is concerned. His conclusions are correct but the path he takes is not. If you increase your metabolism, then you burn more calories. So it's not a matter of calories being less/more effective as it is manipulating how your body uses them. Obviously if you eat one meal of 3000kcals a day or break it up into 6 of 500, you'll get varied results.

But yes, saying a calorie is a calorie is grossly oversimplifying reality. If you're in college you don't write a paper at a gradeschool level.

bradley
12-01-2003, 01:22 PM
Originally posted by mr_hand
Once again in the nutrition department, we have a nice contradiction.

Bradley I wanted you to check this out because you are one of the most knowledgeable people on nutrition that I know. How do you feel about what this guy is saying cuz I know you back the theory of a calorie is a calorie and cals in vs. cals out. Tell me what you think.

Here is an old thread that should help.
http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=33842&highlight=meal+frequency



This guys post says "4 tips for fast fat loss"

By: Greg Gillies

"In addition, by adding more protein to each meal, you also increase your metabolism. Your body requires more energy (i.e. calories) to process protein than it does to digest carbohydrates. Do you understand what that means? Think about it. Think about all those people and so called experts that have continually said that a calorie is a calorie.

Sure, but the author makes it seems as though the TEF (thermic effect of food) is going to make a significant difference in the long run, which is not the case. In The Ketogenic Diet by Lyle McDonald, he lists the TEF of the various macronutrients as 20-25%/15-20%/~3% (p/c/f). On average the TEF will correspond to ~10% of your daily calories. So as long as you are not getting the majority of your calories from fat, increasing your protein intake is not going to burn significantly more calories over the course of the day.



THIS SIMPLY IS NOT TRUE! Your body's metabolic rate is affected by the number of meals you eat, the frequency of those meals (how much time passes between each meal consumed) and the macro nutrient composition of those meals.


The thread I posted above should refute the author's statements above.



A calorie is not simply a calorie and they are not equal.


A calorie is a unit of heat, so a calorie is a calorie. Sure you can change the calories out part of the equation (calories in-calories out=daily energy balance), but to say a calorie is not a calorie is not accurate.



Depending on the number of meals, frequency of meals, and macro nutrient composition of meals, the same person's metabolism will be different on two very different meals plans, EVEN IF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF CALORIES ARE THE SAME! "

While I do not think frequency of meals will be an important factor, meal composition can change the calories out portion of the equation.

If you have specific questions on any of my posts in the thread I posted above, feel free to ask.:)

galileo
12-01-2003, 01:49 PM
I do not think frequency of meals will be an important factor

You should start eating one meal a day then. I mean, why inconvenience yourself with frequent meals if it's negligible?

bradley
12-01-2003, 01:58 PM
I should have been more specific, sorry about that. I was implying that there will not be a significant difference if one is consuming 3 meals vs. 6 meals per day. This is covered to a great extent in the thread I posted above.

hemants
12-02-2003, 06:22 AM
The metabolic difference between eating high fibre low glycemic carbs and protein would be so negligible that it wouldn't really make much of a difference.

Let's put it this way, this falls into the same category as eating cold food so that your body has to expend energy to bring it to body temperature. A real impact but negligible in magnitude.

ftotti10
12-05-2003, 04:16 AM
With regards the whole calorie in calorie out theory, its definitely not that simple. The timing of your calories along with calories in calories out is what gets you the best results.

If you are on 3000 cals a day, and consume most during the day, then workout at night and miss out on those vital hours after training then you will not achieve the same results as properly timing your calorie intake to take advantage of the times when yopur body need them most. In both cases you will consume 3000 calories but your muscle gain would be a lot different.


I think on here we give a lot more focus on the amount of calories as opposed to the timing of them

AllUp
12-05-2003, 08:49 AM
True, Timing is key indeed. I know someone who is cutting and gimps himself Hardcore. I.E not having Dinner or carbs pre w/o. Performance at the gym is usually utter S*** for him. :/

Not to mention he is taking in like 1100 cal's. He most likely isn't even meeting his caloric req's for sleeping, but he's stubborn.. :/

Shao-LiN
12-05-2003, 12:14 PM
Caloric requirements for sleeping?

AllUp
12-05-2003, 12:26 PM
Yeah, The way he eats I'm surprised he has enough energy to turn the key to start his car. The kid just eats like.. Nothing.. :/