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tom o
01-26-2004, 07:07 PM
At what age, on average, do men reach their full strength potential? Minus all the variables of training.

Saint Patrick
01-26-2004, 07:08 PM
I'd say early-mid twenties.

tom o
01-26-2004, 07:11 PM
Sweet jeebus, that was a swift reply.

JeffWillConquer
01-26-2004, 07:20 PM
Most men have more potential than we would ever imagine. If only we could use it right.

dblockspky
01-26-2004, 07:26 PM
depend on how hard you train throughout all those periods in your life.. i'd guesstimate late twenties

RuLess
01-26-2004, 08:01 PM
early teens

JTyrell710
01-26-2004, 08:16 PM
RuLess
no
22-27 is the peak for many men

JuniorMint6669
01-26-2004, 08:56 PM
http://www.wannabebigforums.com/showthread.php?t=36244&highlight=peak

tom o
01-26-2004, 09:33 PM
That's the ticket. Thanks.

BigCorey75
01-26-2004, 09:49 PM
ive actually heard that if men keep training seriously that most men dont reach full strength until there late 30's even early 40's

RuLess
01-27-2004, 04:11 AM
it was a joke jtyrel.. chill homie

body
01-27-2004, 04:47 AM
ive actually heard that if men keep training seriously that most men dont reach full strength until there late 30's even early 40's

same here.

look at the age of top powerlifters and strong men. on average they are in there 30's i think.
you get some freaks who like excel at a young age.
though probably the average person may peak early than the althelte athlete as they get A) injured B) lack dedication.

chris mason
01-27-2004, 11:05 AM
Men will reach their peak strength potential in their early to mid thirties. That is absolutely correct and true.

JTyrell710
01-27-2004, 01:41 PM
i think the reason all the best pros are at that age is because it has taken them that long (after they got into it) to build all the muscle

geoffgarcia
01-27-2004, 01:43 PM
ditto mid to late 30's
look at the top track athletes...
sports like basketball, baseball, hockey and football might peak a little sooner because of the banging they place on a body...not because the muscles have reached their potential....

BUFF STUFF
01-27-2004, 05:00 PM
Endurance wize its definatly mid 30s+

Strenghth wise im guessing 21-27ish but not sure

benchmonster
01-28-2004, 10:22 AM
Well, just take a look at who is setting the world records in the powerlifts, and then tell me what age men are at their strongest.

George Halbert did 733 bench at 215 bodyweight. All time world record, and was age 35.

Steve Goggins set the all time world record squat at just over 1100 lbs at about 255 bodyweight and was aged 39.

Scott Mendelson benched over 800, and closed in on 900 at 320 lbs bodyweight and was 35 years old.

Garry Frank, all time record holder in the total, and at one time in the deadlift, was 38 when he did his highest total ( I beleive).

With the exception of Marius Pudjenowski (sp?) the recent WSM winners have been in their mid 30's.

There are some exceptions, of course, as their is to every rule, but with a few exceptions it would seem that most men who train seriously are at their peak strength in their 30's.

And those who said early 20's, I am guessing that you posters are very young. I am 29 right now, and I am so much stronger than I was at age 21 or 22, it is not even funny. And I will be stronger in 5 years than I am now. And probably stronger 5 years after that too.

Herman Goerner did some of his greatest feats of strength in his early 40's. If you stay healthy, and keep at it, you can keep getting stronger for many many years. But if you abuse your body, or are in a sport where it must take abuse (football) then you will peak at an earlier age.

I think that there is a race going on between strength gains and injury. If you gain strength but get injured, then obviously the strength gains slow or stop till the injury resolves. If you get hurt too badly, or too often, then you are reducing the total amount of gains you can ever expect to get, or will reduce the age at which you will peak. (reducing the height of the peak at the same time)

So, that was a long way around the barn to get to say that men are, absent injury, generally strongest mid 30's or thereabouts.

B.

Flying Knight
02-02-2004, 10:14 PM
At what age, on average, do men reach their full strength potential? Minus all the variables of training.
30 something, can maintain most of it till early 50 w/ regular training and good lifestyle. what teens or 20 is total crap.

Songsangnim
02-03-2004, 04:37 AM
As the resident English teacher here I am going to weigh in with my answer. The OP qualified his question by saying "minus all the variables of training " Why are most people talking about people who train? That was NOT the question. BTW the answer is 18-25. After age 25 the average human male will generally lose (on average) about .5 of muscle mass a year.


Of course weight training can halt and even reverse this trend to a very great extent, but to what extent depends on type of training, genetic factors, natural or not, and many other variables.

-sin-
02-03-2004, 06:54 AM
How the hell do you suggest reaching your full strength potential without training? Go back to school and take a class on common sense.

tom o
02-03-2004, 08:19 AM
-sin- , you seem to assume that there is no such thing as untrained strength potential. From ExtremeAnabolic's post, it should have been obvious that this is not so.

-sin-
02-03-2004, 08:42 AM
If you want to see your untrained strength potential go live in a zero gravity environment for a few years. Because if you want to get technical, even something as easy as standing or walking is "training" your muscles to carry the load of your body.

tom o
02-03-2004, 08:56 AM
But I don't want to get technical. Notice that you're the only person seeing a problem with this thread? You're just trolling, mane.

JuniorMint6669
02-03-2004, 11:47 AM
Actually, I agree with sin. This is a powerlifting forum, who cares about untrained individuals? :scratch: I mean, sure, maybe you do, but why?

tom o
02-03-2004, 01:59 PM
Well, I don't much care other than for the sake of knowing. To tell you the truth, all the answers up to ExtremeAnabolic's were exactly what I was looking for. I didn't make it clear what I meant, but I saw no need to change my question, as I was getting the answers I sought. I simply responded to -sin- to refute his statement.

Songsangnim
02-04-2004, 04:05 AM
How the hell do you suggest reaching your full strength potential without training? Go back to school and take a class on common sense.

I was replying to the OP's post. I suggest that you go back to school and take a class of common courtesy.


As for the OP, why did you state in your post "minus all the variables of training". As the only way to subtract all the variables of training would be not to train at all, it sounded like you were asking about untrained strength potential. This is not a flame, but the way your original post was worded that is what it looked like you were asking.

tom o
02-04-2004, 11:18 AM
ExtremeAnabolic, I appreciate your response. Although I didn't intend to ask the question that you answered initially, I did plan it as a follow-up. As to why I wrote "minus all the variables of training," I'll quote myself.

I didn't make it clear what I meant, but I saw no need to change my question, as I was getting the answers I sought.

Seanzilla
02-04-2004, 11:36 AM
Powerlifting is a very accurate test of "maximum output" muscular strength. Most lifters at the nationals/worlds level are between their late 20s - very early 40s. I'd guestimate that a lifter (who trains consistantly and who avoids major injury) reaches his peak in his late 30s on average.

I think that a person hits their repetitive rep strength between their late 20s - mid 30s.

I think that a person hits their high rep endurance strength in their late teens - late 20s.

It's really cool that powerlifting has masters classes (40-49, 50-59, 60-69, ect.). This allows lifters to continue to compete and to compare themselves to their peers, rather than to the open class.

Seanzilla Katterle
Monster Muscle Magazine
http://www.monstermusclemag.com

M-Tiz46
02-05-2004, 08:52 PM
I read in men's health that men are in the best shape at 23.

body
02-06-2004, 03:53 AM
I read in men's health that men are in the best shape at 23.

best shape for what?
spritning, distance running, powerlifter. ignore the article in mens and health as that is very larger blanket statement.