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talonted
02-18-2004, 04:47 PM
Is it really that bad for you?

dxiw
02-18-2004, 04:56 PM
yes

galileo
02-18-2004, 05:29 PM
no.

There are many mixed opinions on almost all fish that people commonly consume. As long as you're not downing a ton of salmon, I'd say you'll be alright.

Optimum08
02-18-2004, 06:10 PM
i agree wit galileo, it is harder to tell the diff between wild and farmed and there is nothing to prove that wild is any better than farmed except for maybe the increased fat content of the farmed, but nothing that will kill u...

dxiw
02-18-2004, 07:17 PM
um you guys obviously dont follow research
farmed salmon contains high levels of mercury while wild salmon does not. Also, wild salmon is healthier as far as healthy fatty acids is concerned. But the big thing is the mercury - its especially high in tuna and swordfish

Lox
02-18-2004, 08:00 PM
I dunno about chemicals and stuff but Wild Salmon makes for better eating. The flesh of wild salmon is nice and firm whereas Farm fish are quite mushy feeling when you touch them. Bad for you I'm not sure. Inferior to wild salmon.. Yes I'd say so.

_-_v_-_
02-18-2004, 08:22 PM
It's not mercury.

Do a search for PCBs.

talonted
02-19-2004, 06:25 AM
Damn,

I used to stuff my face with farmed salmon everyday for a long time. I just love it so much! Wild salmon is much more expensive, but I guess I'd be better off sticking with it.

galileo
02-19-2004, 07:07 AM
um you guys obviously dont follow research

lol!

There are mixed studies. In 2003 a study was done by Blackburn that concluded that salmon is still worthwhole, no matter the source.
Salmon and PCBs. Wild or farmed, salmon is still a healthful choice

I would again conclude the same from this. As long as it isn't in excess, you're alright. And determining whether salmon is wild or farmed would be quite difficult, don't you think?

Max-Mex
02-19-2004, 09:59 AM
And determining whether salmon is wild or farmed would be quite difficult, don't you think?

Actually no Gal. If you ask the at the market, they tell you or it says on the package the salmon is wrapped in. Price is a big indicator as well. Fresh wild salmon is about $2-3 more per lb than farm.

Holto
02-19-2004, 10:14 AM
even it the PCB's are low they are with you for life

IceRgrrl
02-19-2004, 10:34 AM
I think it's definitely something to read up on and judge your own risk tolerance...

http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/pcb/effects.html

galileo
02-19-2004, 10:56 AM
Actually no Gal. If you ask the at the market, they tell you or it says on the package the salmon is wrapped in. Price is a big indicator as well. Fresh wild salmon is about $2-3 more per lb than farm.
I was thinking more along the lines of restaurants.

IronDaddy
02-19-2004, 11:15 AM
um you guys obviously dont follow research
farmed salmon contains high levels of mercury while wild salmon does not. Also, wild salmon is healthier as far as healthy fatty acids is concerned. But the big thing is the mercury - its especially high in tuna and swordfish

If you're going to declare info such as this you need to post your sources. Not saying I disagree with you (just a few weeks ago a new report came out on this but I'm too lazy and busy to look it up.)

drew
02-19-2004, 11:18 AM
Mmmmm, mercury...

ryuage
02-19-2004, 11:40 AM
i doubt he is eating enough farmed salmon to worry about the mercury content unless he is eating the damn thing 6x a day haha.

gino
02-20-2004, 06:44 AM
It's not mercury that is the problem. It's something else, and only in farm-raised...I'm thinking I heard it was arsenic, and the levels were definitely not healthy

ElPietro
02-20-2004, 07:09 AM
The Salmon Oil EFA capsules I bought were specified as "wild harvested" which drove the price up considerably. So even in supplement form you can find the distinction if you look for it.

I think at most markets they will have them seperate, or different markets will acknowledge the source of their fish.

I don't eat fish though, so I guess I only worry about where the gel caps came from.

Holto
02-20-2004, 08:02 PM
I see Organika has

"Wild Harvested" on theirs...

it's funny is it wild and fished for
or farmed and harvested

ogarchamplin
02-21-2004, 09:43 PM
I dont like Salmon but i eat a lot of Talipia

MonkeyBoy
02-21-2004, 10:10 PM
Not that this has anything to do with the conversation..

Farm raised salmon are a serious threat to the wild salmon......not sure of the exact details why...

I met a guy from Alaska last year who fishes for wild salmon who was extremely passionate about spreading the word of the dangers of farm raised...

MonkeyBoy
02-21-2004, 10:11 PM
http://www.ems.org/salmon/wild_vs_farmed.html

Farmed Salmon


Producing 32,000 tons of farmed salmon produces sewage equivalent to that generated by a city of 500,000 people. These wastes degrade water quality and smother communities of plants and animals beneath salmon cages.

Crowding salmon in small pens fosters the spread of disease. To counter this threat, salmon farmers use antibiotics, vaccines and other chemicals, much of which can enter the water. There has been little or no research on the impacts of this heavy use of chemicals upon marine life and human health.

Salmon farms are a sitting target for marine mammals and sea birds looking for a meal. In British Columbia, an estimated 500 harbor seals are shot each year to protect salmon farms. Netting used to exclude marine mammals and birds can entangle and drown helpless animals. Acoustic devices used to scare away seals and sea lions have been too successful in some places, leading to the withdrawal of resident populations of harbor porpoises and whales.

Salmon pens are often accidentally ripped open, releasing salmon into surrounding waterways. In Norway, where as many as 1.3 million salmon escape from farms each year, one-third of the salmon spawning in coastal rivers are not wild but escaped salmon. Besides competing for food and spawning habitat, escaped salmon may interbreed with wild salmon, reducing the latter's fitness.

The flesh of farmed salmon is a pale color that is unappealing to consumers. The dyes canthaxanthin or astaxanthin or both are added to the feed of farmed salmon to improve its appearance.
Wild Salmon


Unlike farmed fish, wild salmon are harvested when they are mature, after their feeding cycle has ended, when their flesh is firm and their migration has begun.

Wild salmon are crucial to the health of our rivers. They carry nutrients from the river to the sea and back again, entering the food chain as a vital feast for wildlife and fertilizing rivers and forests after they spawn, die and decompose.

Wild salmon are one of the Northwest's greatest renewable resources. Careful monitoring of wild runs, their watersheds and the ecosystems that support them ensure economic and environmental sustainability, healthy economic returns for future generations and the preservation of pristine habitat.

Wild salmon have higher levels of oil content than farmed salmon due to thousands of years of natural selection providing them with the fat reserves necessary to migrate and spawn thousands of miles. The oil contains high levels of Omega-3s - the unsaturated fat that helps fend off heart disease, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer and migraines. The high levels of oil are the key to the salmon's revered flavor, which is preferred by discerning chefs and consumers throughout the country.

Salmon are a sign of healthy rivers. A river where salmon flourish provides us with clean water to drink and healthy fish to eat. If the salmon suffer, eventually we will too.

MonkeyBoy
02-21-2004, 10:13 PM
http://www.vitalchoice.com/faq.html#wildcaught

ectx
02-22-2004, 03:57 PM
Just a point of clarification: The use of vaccines for the fish should not pose a threat to the general population. The vaccines are usually inactive or attenuated forms of the offending pathogen, or even present as recombinant protein. The use of antibiotics and antiseptics does pose an environmental threat. Still, we see this with the farming of any animal, whether it be chickens, or cows, or pigs. The amount of waiste they generate, the disease they breed, as well as the prophylactic use of chemicals to treat them are byproducts of farming any animal (or any comestible...meat or veggie) for consumption.

Holto
02-23-2004, 09:31 AM
Just a point of clarification: The use of vaccines for the fish should not pose a threat to the general population. The vaccines are usually inactive or attenuated forms of the offending pathogen, or even present as recombinant protein

if that's all that was in it that would be one thing

even the vaccines they give humans have known carcinogens like fermaldahyde (sp)

ectx
02-23-2004, 12:59 PM
if that's all that was in it that would be one thing

even the vaccines they give humans have known carcinogens like fermaldahyde (sp)

Formaldehyde, to my knowledge, is not used in vaccines. For animals we usually use adjuvant, a substance known to illicit a strong inflamatory response. Adjuvant is mycobacterial protein disolved in lanolin and mineral oil. Most vaccines are dissolved in PEG (polyethylene glycol) or some kind of oil. My vaccine preparations usually involve PEG or adjuvant. That's for animals though. I asked the MD in our lab and she told me that they do not use formaldehyde in human vaccines.

*edit* I'm not trying to be a smart ass or know-it-all. I know about the dangers of PCB's and I am a strong advocate against the broad use of antibiotics in the farming industry. I'm just telling you that the vaccines shouldn't harm us. They might even harm the fish, but not us.

talonted
02-24-2004, 09:19 AM
Last weekend was the first time I bought smoked Pacific wild salmon, I finighed the whole thing in one night....mmmm so good. It tasted a lot better than farmed smoked salmon I used to buy all the time.